Watch CBS News

Oakmont Country Club To Host Numerous Future USGA Events Including U.S. Open

August 11, 2021 / 11:48 AM EDT / CBS Pittsburgh

By: KDKA-TV News Staff

OAKMONT, Pa. (KDKA) --  The USGA has announced a long-term relationship with Oakmont Country Club that will bring several championship golf events to Western Pennsylvania over the next two decades.

The news was announced Wednesday morning at the U.S. Amateur Championship, which is being co-hosted this week by Oakmont Country Club and the Longue Vue Club.

Oakmont Country Club Clubhouse view from #3

Oakmont Country Club had previously been designated as the site for the 2025 U.S. Open, but the tournament will also be returning to the historic venue in 2034, 2042, and 2049.

The U.S. Women's Open will be played there in 2028 and 2038.

The venue will also host the 2033 Walker Cup Match and the 2046 U.S. Women's Amateur.

This new relationship between Oakmont Country Club and the USGA will make Oakmont the second U.S. Open anchor site, meaning championship golf will return to the venue every five to six years.

#1 Tee - Oakmont Country Club Rolex Clock

Prior to this week's U.S. Amateur Championship, the venue hosted the U.S. Open in 2016 and 2007, and the U.S. Amateur in 2003.

For more information, click here.

Featured Local Savings

More from cbs news.

Man pronounced dead following possible DUI ATV crash in Butler County

2 Americans take first-place honors at 2024 Pittsburgh Marathon

Police investigating deadly shooting at home of suspect accused of pulling gun on pastor in North Braddock

Pennsylvania native nearing end of his cross-country run to fight human trafficking

usga

  • 2023 Results
  • History Experience
  • Records & Results
  • USGA Experience Packages
  • USGA OnDemand
  • Future Sites
  • Corporate Hospitality

United States Open: Future Sites

2024: pinehurst resort & c.c. (course no. 2) - village of pinehurst, n.c..

Payne Stewart Statue of Pinehurst No. 2 in Pinehurst, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013.  (Copyright USGA/John Mummert)

June 13-16, 2024

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club is set to add another illustrious chapter to its championship history by hosting its fourth U.S. Open and 11th USGA championship. Founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts in 1895, Pinehurst quickly evolved into one of the premier resort destinations in the country. Legendary architect Donald Ross created Course No. 2 in 1907 and constantly tinkered with the design until his death in 1948. The USGA began its long association with the resort in 1962 with the U.S. Amateur, and 37 years later a memorable U.S. Open was contested, with Payne Stewart holing an 18-foot par putt on the 72nd hole to edge Phil Mickelson by a stroke. In 2014, Pinehurst and the USGA made more history by staging the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open in consecutive weeks on Course No. 2. It also was announced that Pinehurst will be an "anchor" host site for four additional U.S. Opens through the year 2047. Besides the 2024 championship, the resort will host in 2029, 2035, 2041 and 2047.

Tickets | Hospitality | Volunteer  |  USGA Experience Packages

2025: Oakmont Country Club - Oakmont, Pa.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 12-15, 2025

What better way to celebrate the 125th playing of the U.S. Open than by staging it at the venue that has hosted the most Opens? Oakmont will host the championship for a record 10th time in 2025, three times more than any other club. It will also be the club's 17th USGA championship, which ranks one behind fellow Pennsylvania venue Merion Golf Club for the most all time. Henry Clay (H.C.) Fownes designed Oakmont to challenge the best golfers in the world and that philosophy hasn’t changed since Oakmont member S. Davidson Herron defeated Bob Jones in the championship match of the 1919 U.S. Amateur. Oakmont continues to be one of the most challenging championship layouts, most recently on display in Dustin Johnson’s 2016 U.S. Open victory.

It was announced in August, 2021, that Oakmont would also host future U.S. Opens in 2034, 2042, and 2049, along with a number of other USGA championships, including the U.S. Women's Open in 2028 and 2038, the Walker Cup in 2033, and the U.S. Women's Amateur in 2046 .

Tickets |  Hospitality  | USGA Experience Packages  | Volunteers

2026: Shinnecock Hills Golf Club - Southampton, N.Y.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 18-21, 2026

The USGA appreciates the championship test provided by Shinnecock Hills so much that it awarded the Southampton, N.Y., venue the 2026 U.S. Open before it hosted the 2018 Open. Brooks Koepka, the 2018 champion, barring some unforeseen circumstance, will have the opportunity to win again at Shinnecock Hills, as winners receive a 10-year exemption from qualifying. The historic, links-style course that overlooks Great Peconic Bay is one of the world's most iconic venues. Shinnecock Hills hosted the 1896 U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur, as well as the 1900 U.S. Women’s Amateur before being redesigned by William Flynn in 1937. In 2013, the noted design team of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw enhanced the course for the 118th U.S. Open. Raymond Floyd (1986), Corey Pavin (1995) and Retief Goosen (2004) have also claimed U.S. Open titles at Shinnecock Hills.

Hospitality

2027: Pebble Beach Golf Links - Pebble Beach, Calif.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 17-20, 2027

Few places on the planet can match the beauty of this picturesque Monterey Peninsula venue. Some have called Pebble Beach one of the greatest meetings of land and sea, which is one factor in the USGA’s longtime affinity for hosting championships on the course. Pebble Beach, which is the annual site of the PGA Tour’s AT&T National Pro-Am, has provided some of the game’s legendary moments, from Jack Nicklaus hitting the flagstick with his 1-iron tee shot on the 71st hole of the 1972 U.S. Open, to Tom Watson’s chip-in from greenside rough on that same iconic par-3 71st hole of the 1982 U.S. Open, to Tiger Woods’ record-setting 15-stroke victory in the 2000 U.S. Open. In 2017, the USGA announced that the 2023 U.S. Women’s Open will be contested there, the first Women’s Open at Pebble Beach, with Allisen Corpuz claiming the title. Tom Kite (1992), Graeme McDowell (2010) and Gary Woodland (2019) have also won U.S. Open titles at Pebble Beach. Viktor Hovland won the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble before embarking on what has been a successful professional career. The U.S. Open also will return to Pebble Beach in 2032, 2037 and 2044, with the U.S. Women's Open coming back in 2027.

2028: Winged Foot Golf Club - Mamaroneck, N.Y

pga tour oakmont pa

June 15-18, 2028

Eight years after hosting the first U.S. Open without fans due to COVID-19 health and safety protocols, the West Course will challenge the game's best players for a seventh time in its illustrious history. Winged Foot was the site of Bob Jones' playoff victory over Al Espinosa in 1929, the third of his four titles. In 1959, Billy Casper's mastery on the greens netted the Southern California native the first of two titles, and in 1974, Hale Irwin survived the "Massacre at Winged Foot" with a 72-hole total of 7-over-par 287 for the first of his three championships. Fuzzy Zoeller won a memorable playoff over Greg Norman in 1984, and in 2006 Geoff Ogilvy was the last man standing after several players, including Phil Mickelson suffered unfortunate heartbreak on the 72nd hole. Bryson DeChambeau, in 2020, overpowered the demanding West Course with a 6-under total of 274, joining the likes of Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Tiger Woods as players to have claimed both the U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open titles.

2029: Pinehurst Resort & C.C. (Course No. 2) - Village of Pinehurst, N.C.

The par-3 17th hole will measure 207 yards for the championship. (USGA/John Mummert)

June 14-17, 2029

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club will add another illustrious chapter to its championship pedigree by hosting its fifth U.S. Open in 2029, and for the second time it will also conduct the U.S. Women's Open in consecutive weeks. In 2014, Pinehurst had the U.S. Open and U.S. Women's Open in the same year for the first time in USGA history. Martin Kaymer prevailed in the U.S. Open and Michelle Wie won a week later. Founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts in 1895, Pinehurst quickly evolved into one of the premier resort destinations in the country. Legendary architect Donald Ross created Course No. 2 in 1907 and constantly tinkered with the design until his death in 1948. The USGA began its long association with the resort in 1962 with the U.S. Amateur, and 37 years later a memorable U.S. Open was contested, with Payne Stewart holing an 18-foot par putt on the 72nd hole to edge Phil Mickelson by a stroke. An "anchor site," Pinehurst No. 2 will also stage the U.S. Open again in 2035, 2041 and 2047.

2030: Merion Golf Club - Ardmore, Pa.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 13-16, 2030

The U.S. Open returns to historic Merion Golf Club, where the championship will commemorate the 100-year anniversary of Bob Jones completing the Grand Slam with his victory in the 1930 U.S. Amateur. Merion has been the site of five previous U.S. Open Championships, including Ben Hogan's remarkable playoff win in 1950 just 18 months from a near-fatal automobile accident. Hy Peskin's photo of Hogan hitting a 1-iron to the 72nd hole stands as one of the most iconic images in the history of the game. In 1971, Lee Trevino claimed the second of his two titles in a memorable playoff triumph over Jack Nicklaus. At the start of the 18-hole playoff, Trevino playfully tossed a rubber snake at Nicklaus, which drew a hearty chuckle from the Golden Bear. When the U.S. Open returned to the Ardmore, Pa., club in 1981, David Graham prevailed by hitting all 18 greens in regulation in the final round. And in 2013, Justin Rose carded a final-round 70 to claim a two-stroke win over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. Besides Jones' U.S. Amateur win, Edoardo Molinari took the 2005 U.S. Amateur at Merion after barely sneaking into the match-play draw via a playoff. He became the first Italian to hoist the Havemeyer Trophy. No club has hosted more USGA championships than Merion (19).

2031: Riviera Country Club- Pacific Palisades, Calif.

The 18th hole of Riviera Country Club  in Pacific Palisades, Calif. on Thursday, April 21, 2016.  (Copyright USGA/JD Cuban)

June 12-15, 2031

The U.S. Open will make its return to The Riviera Country Club for the first time since Ben Hogan captured the first of his four titles in 1948. The classic George C. Thomas Jr. design earned the moniker "Hogan's Alley" because of the Texan's success at the venue. Hogan also won the Los Angeles Open three times at Riviera (1942, 1947 and 1948), which has been the longtime home of the PGA Tour event (now called Genesis Open). This will be the third major championship at Riviera following the 1983 and 1995 PGA Championships won by Hal Sutton and Steve Elkington, respectively. Doc Redman also won a memorable U.S. Amateur at Riviera in 2017, defeating Doug Ghim in 37 holes, and Hale Irwin captured the 1998 U.S. Senior Open there. Before the U.S. Open is contested in 2031, the U.S. Women's Open will be staged at Riviera in 2026, and it will be the venue for golf in the 1928 Summer Olympics.

2032: Pebble Beach Golf Links - Pebble Beach, Calif.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 17-20, 2032

Few places on the planet can match the beauty of this picturesque Monterey Peninsula venue. Some have called Pebble Beach one of the greatest meetings of land and sea, which is one factor in the USGA’s longtime affinity for hosting championships on the course. Pebble Beach, which is the annual site of the PGA Tour’s AT&T National Pro-Am, has provided some of the game’s legendary moments, from Jack Nicklaus hitting the flagstick with his 1-iron tee shot on the 71st hole of the 1972 U.S. Open, to Tom Watson’s chip-in from greenside rough on that same iconic par-3 71st hole of the 1982 U.S. Open, to Tiger Woods’ record-setting 15-stroke victory in the 2000 U.S. Open. In 2023, the U.S. Women's Open was held at Pebble for the first time, with Allisen Corpuz claiming the title. Tom Kite (1992), Graeme McDowell (2010) and Gary Woodland (2019) have also won U.S. Open titles at Pebble Beach. Viktor Hovland won the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble before embarking on what has been a successful professional career. Named as an "anchor site," the U.S. Open is returning to Pebble Beach in 2037 and 2044.

2033: Oakmont Country Club - Oakmont, Pa.

The 4th Hole at Oakmont Country Club as seen on 7/20/20.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

June 16-19, 2033

The U.S. Open will return to Oakmont for a record 11th time in 2033. It will also be the club's 20th USGA championship, which ranks one behind fellow Pennsylvania venue Merion Golf Club for the most all time. Henry Clay (H.C.) Fownes designed Oakmont to challenge the best golfers in the world and that philosophy hasn’t changed since Oakmont member S. Davidson Herron defeated Bob Jones in the championship match of the 1919 U.S. Amateur. Oakmont continues to be one of the most challenging championship layouts, most recently on display in Dustin Johnson’s 2016 U.S. Open victory.

Oakmont will also host future U.S. Opens in 2042, and 2049, along with the 2038 U.S. Women's Open and the U.S. Women's Amateur in 2046.

2034: Oakland Hills Country Club (South Course) - Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

pga tour oakmont pa

June 15-18, 2034

Historic Oakland Hills Country Club will play host to its seventh U.S. Open in 2034, and its first since Steve Jones edged Davis Love III and Tom Lehman by one stroke after getting into the field via final qualifying. Prior to the 1951 U.S. Open on the famed South Course, noted architect Robert Trent Jones Sr. did an extensive renovation of the original Donald Ross gem, lengthening and toughening the layout that it received its "Monster" moniker from 1951 champion Ben Hogan. After Hogan recorded the third of his four victories with a 7-over total of 287, the Texan said afterward, "I'm glad I brought this course -- this monster -- to its knees." Ten years later, Gene Littler's 1-over 281 was good enough to earn him a U.S. Open victory, and in 1985, Andy North collected the second of his two U.S. Open titles here. Three PGA Championships and a Ryder Cup, won by Europe, have also been contested at Oakland Hills.

2035: Pinehurst Resort & C.C. (Course No. 2) - Village of Pinehurst, N.C.

A look at the 199-yard, par-3 15th hole. (USGA/Fred Vuich)

June 14-17, 2035

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club will add another illustrious chapter to its championship pedigree by hosting its sixth U.S. Open in 2035. Founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts in 1895, Pinehurst quickly evolved into one of the premier resort destinations in the country. Legendary architect Donald Ross created Course No. 2 in 1907 and constantly tinkered with the design until his death in 1948. The USGA began its long association with the resort in 1962 with the U.S. Amateur, and 37 years later a memorable U.S. Open was contested, with Payne Stewart holing an 18-foot par putt on the 72nd hole to edge Phil Mickelson by a stroke. In 2014 the USGA made history by conducting the U.S. Open and U.S. Women's Open on Course No. 2 in consecutive weeks. Martin Kaymer and Michelle Wie prevailed. 

An "anchor site," Pinehurst No. 2 will also stage the U.S. Open again in 2041 and 2047.

2036: Shinnecock Hills Golf Club - Southampton, N.Y.

A view of Shinnecock Hills Golf Course as photographed in 2002 in Southampton, N.Y. (Copyright USGA)

The USGA will once again return to one of its five founding clubs with the 2036 U.S. Open going to Shinnecock Hills. The club will make history by also hosting the U.S. Women's Open that year, joining Pinehurst No. 2 as the only venues to conduct the USGA's two biggest competitions in the same calendar year in consecutive weeks. Shinnecock Hills also will host the U.S. Open in 2026. Brooks Koepka claimed the 2018 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills, becoming the first player since Curtis Strange (1988-89) to successfully defend. The historic, links-style course that overlooks Great Peconic Bay is one of the world's most iconic venues. Shinnecock Hills hosted the 1896 U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur, as well as the 1900 U.S. Women’s Amateur before being redesigned by William Flynn in 1937. In 2013, the noted design team of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw enhanced the course for the 118th U.S. Open. Raymond Floyd (1986), Corey Pavin (1995) and Retief Goosen (2004) have also claimed U.S. Open titles at Shinnecock Hills.

2037: Pebble Beach Golf Links - Pebble Beach, Calif

Some have called Pebble Beach one of the greatest meetings of land and sea, which is one factor in the USGA’s longtime affinity for hosting championships on this Monterey Peninsula venue. Pebble Beach, which is the annual site of the PGA Tour’s AT&T National Pro-Am, has provided some of the game’s legendary moments, from Jack Nicklaus hitting the flagstick with his 1-iron tee shot on the 71st hole of the 1972 U.S. Open, to Tom Watson’s chip-in from greenside rough on that same iconic par-3 71st hole of the 1982 U.S. Open, to Tiger Woods’ record-setting 15-stroke victory in the 2000 U.S. Open. In 2023, the U.S. Women's Open was held at Pebble for the first time, with Allisen Corpuz claiming the title. Tom Kite (1992), Graeme McDowell (2010) and Gary Woodland (2019) have also won U.S. Open titles at Pebble Beach. Viktor Hovland won the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble before embarking on what has been a successful professional career. Named as an "anchor site," the U.S. Open will return again to Pebble Beach in 2044.

2038: The Country Club - Brookline, Mass.

The 18th Hole of The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. as seen on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021.  (Copyright USGA/John Mummert)

June 16-19, 2039

The U.S. Open will return to The Country Club, one of the five founding clubs of the USGA, for a fifth time while celebrating the 125th anniversary of one of the greatest upsets in sports. In 1913, amateur Francis Ouimet, a former caddie at the club, took down English stalwarts Harry Vardon and Ted Ray in an 18-hole playoff to win the U.S. Open. Ouimet was guided that week by 10-year-old caddie Eddie Lowery. The next two U.S. Opens at the venue also went to playoffs, with Julius Boros (1963) and Curtis Strange (1988) emerging as champions. In 2022, Matt Fitzpatrick joined Jack Nicklaus as the only players to have won a U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open at the same venue when he held off Will Zalatoris and Scottie Scheffler in a memorable final round.

2039: The Los Angeles (Calif.) Country Club (North Course)

pga tour oakmont pa

When the USGA brought the 2017 Walker Cup Match to The Los Angeles Country Club’s North Course, many in the outside world finally got a glimpse of this George C. Thomas gem. The biennial competition, which the USA won, 19-7, also served as a prelude to the club hosting its first U.S. Open, won by Wyndham Clark. The club, which resides on some of the country’s prime real estate, hosted the 1930 U.S. Women’s Amateur and 1954 U.S. Junior Amateur, but did not host many major outside competitions. The membership decided it was the right time to showcase this magnificent facility to the world after the North Course underwent an extensive renovation by Gil Hanse in 2010. It reached out to the USGA expressing interest in hosting the 2017 Walker Cup, which led to the club landing the 2023 U.S. Open.

2040: Merion Golf Club - Ardmore, Pa.

The 18th Hole as seen at Merion Golf Clubâ  s East Course in Ardmore, PA on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

June 14-17, 2040

The U.S. Open returns to historic Merion Golf Club in 2040, where Bob Jones completed his memorable Grand Slam with his victory in the 1930 U.S. Amateur. Merion has been the site of six previous U.S. Open Championships, including Ben Hogan's remarkable playoff win in 1950 just 18 months from a near-fatal automobile accident. Hy Peskin's photo of Hogan hitting a 1-iron to the 72nd hole stands as one of the most iconic images in the history of the game. In 1971, Lee Trevino claimed the second of his two titles in a memorable playoff triumph over Jack Nicklaus. At the start of the 18-hole playoff, Trevino playfully tossed a rubber snake at Nicklaus, which drew a hearty chuckle from the Golden Bear. When the U.S. Open returned to the Ardmore, Pa., club in 1981, David Graham prevailed by hitting all 18 greens in regulation in the final round. And in 2013, Justin Rose carded a final-round 70 to claim a two-stroke win over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. Besides Jones' U.S. Amateur win, Edoardo Molinari took the 2005 U.S. Amateur at Merion after barely sneaking into the match-play draw via a playoff. He became the first Italian to hoist the Havemeyer Trophy. No club has hosted more USGA championships than Merion (21).

2041: Pinehurst Resort & C.C. (Course No. 2) - Village of Pinehurst, N.C.

A view of the 184-yard, par-3 ninth hole. (USGA/Fred Vuich)

June 13-16, 2041

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club will add another illustrious chapter to its championship pedigree by hosting its seventh U.S. Open in 2041. Founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts in 1895, Pinehurst quickly evolved into one of the premier resort destinations in the country. Legendary architect Donald Ross created Course No. 2 in 1907 and constantly tinkered with the design until his death in 1948. The USGA began its long association with the resort in 1962 with the U.S. Amateur, and 37 years later a memorable U.S. Open was contested, with Payne Stewart holing an 18-foot par putt on the 72nd hole to edge Phil Mickelson by a stroke. In 2014 the USGA made history by conducting the U.S. Open and U.S. Women's Open on Course No. 2 in consecutive weeks. Martin Kaymer and Michelle Wie prevailed. 

An "anchor site," Pinehurst No. 2 will also stage the U.S. Open again in 2047.

2042: Oakmont Country Club - Oakmont, Pa.

June 12-15, 2042.

The U.S. Open will return to Oakmont for a record 12th time in 2042. Henry Clay (H.C.) Fownes designed Oakmont to challenge the best golfers in the world and that philosophy hasn’t changed since Oakmont member S. Davidson Herron defeated Bob Jones in the championship match of the 1919 U.S. Amateur. Oakmont continues to be one of the most challenging championship layouts. Dustin Johnson won the U.S. Open here in 2016. It also was the site where Johnny Miller carded a final-round 63 to win the 1973 U.S. Open, which some consider one of the greatest rounds in major-championship history.  Oakmont will again host the U.S. Opens in 2049.

2044: Pebble Beach Golf Links - Pebble Beach, Calif.

Some have called Pebble Beach one of the greatest meetings of land and sea, which is one factor in the USGA’s longtime affinity for hosting championships on this Monterey Peninsula venue. Pebble Beach, which is the annual site of the PGA Tour’s AT&T National Pro-Am, has provided some of the game’s legendary moments, from Jack Nicklaus hitting the flagstick with his 1-iron tee shot on the 71st hole of the 1972 U.S. Open, to Tom Watson’s chip-in from greenside rough on that same iconic par-3 71st hole of the 1982 U.S. Open, to Tiger Woods’ record-setting 15-stroke victory in the 2000 U.S. Open. In 2023, the U.S. Women's Open was held at Pebble for the first time, with Allisen Corpuz claiming the title. Tom Kite (1992), Graeme McDowell (2010) and Gary Woodland (2019) have also won U.S. Open titles at Pebble Beach. Viktor Hovland won the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble before embarking on what has been a successful professional career.

2047: Pinehurst Resort & C.C. (Course No. 2) - Village of Pinehurst, N.C.

The 13th hole is a par 4 that will measure 381 yards for the U.S. Open. (USGA/John Mummert)

June 13-16, 2047

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club will add another illustrious chapter to its championship pedigree by hosting its eighth U.S. Open in 2045. Founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts in 1895, Pinehurst quickly evolved into one of the premier resort destinations in the country. Legendary architect Donald Ross created Course No. 2 in 1907 and constantly tinkered with the design until his death in 1948. The USGA began its long association with the resort in 1962 with the U.S. Amateur, and 37 years later a memorable U.S. Open was contested, with Payne Stewart holing an 18-foot par putt on the 72nd hole to edge Phil Mickelson by a stroke. In 2014 the USGA made history by conducting the U.S. Open and U.S. Women's Open on Course No. 2 in consecutive weeks. Martin Kaymer and Michelle Wie prevailed. 

2049: Oakmont Country Club - Oakmont, Pa.

June 17-20, 2049.

The U.S. Open will return to Oakmont for a record 13th time in 2049. Henry Clay (H.C.) Fownes designed Oakmont to challenge the best golfers in the world and that philosophy hasn’t changed since Oakmont member S. Davidson Herron defeated Bob Jones in the championship match of the 1919 U.S. Amateur. Oakmont continues to be one of the most challenging championship layouts. Dustin Johnson won the U.S. Open here in 2016. It also was the site where Johnny Miller carded a final-round 63 to win the 1973 U.S. Open, which some consider one of the greatest rounds in major-championship history. 

2050: Merion Golf Club - Ardmore, Pa.

The 17th Hole as seen at Merion Golf Club’s East Course in Ardmore, PA on Saturday, July 24, 2021.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

June 16-19, 2050

The U.S. Open returns to historic Merion Golf Club in 2050, where Bob Jones completed his memorable Grand Slam with his victory in the 1930 U.S. Amateur. Merion has been the site of seven previous U.S. Open Championships, including Ben Hogan's remarkable playoff win in 1950 just 18 months from a near-fatal automobile accident. Hy Peskin's photo of Hogan hitting a 1-iron to the 72nd hole stands as one of the most iconic images in the history of the game. In 1971, Lee Trevino claimed the second of his two titles in a memorable playoff triumph over Jack Nicklaus. At the start of the 18-hole playoff, Trevino playfully tossed a rubber snake at Nicklaus, which drew a hearty chuckle from the Golden Bear. When the U.S. Open returned to the Ardmore, Pa., club in 1981, David Graham prevailed by hitting all 18 greens in regulation in the final round. And in 2013, Justin Rose carded a final-round 70 to claim a two-stroke win over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. Besides Jones' U.S. Amateur win, Edoardo Molinari took the 2005 U.S. Amateur at Merion after barely sneaking into the match-play draw via a playoff. He became the first Italian to hoist the Havemeyer Trophy. 

2051: Oakland Hills Country Club - Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

The ninth hole of Oakland Hills Country Club (South Course) in the Bloomfield Hills, Mich. on Sunday, July 9, 2023.  (Copyright USGA/Bill Hornstein)

Historic Oakland Hills Country Club will play host to its eighth U.S. Open in 2051. In 1996, Steve Jones edged Davis Love III and Tom Lehman by one stroke after getting into the field via final qualifying. Prior to the 1951 U.S. Open on the famed South Course, noted architect Robert Trent Jones Sr. did an extensive renovation of the original Donald Ross gem, lengthening and toughening the layout that it received its "Monster" moniker from 1951 champion Ben Hogan. After Hogan recorded the third of his four victories with a 7-over total of 287, the Texan said afterward, "I'm glad I brought this course -- this monster -- to its knees." Ten years later, Gene Littler's 1-over 281 was good enough to earn him a U.S. Open victory, and in 1985, Andy North collected the second of his two U.S. Open titles here. Three PGA Championships and a Ryder Cup, won by Europe, have also been contested at Oakland Hills.

  • Copy link Link Copied

USGA Partners

Ally

  • Privacy Policy
  • About Our Ads
  • Terms Of Use
  • Accessibility

GET ALL OF USGA

Continuous updates, streaming, tee times, scoring, and much more.

USGA 1

© 2023 United States Golf Association. All Rights Reserved.

InsideGolf

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share by Email

US Open: Look Inside Oakmont Reveals Members With Respect for Game

Michael Bamberger

The Fox golf gang, various USGA bluecoats, Jordan Spieth and his touring brahs, they’ll all tell you the same thing: Oakmont is hard –hard but fair!–most likely the hardest course in America, quite possibly the hardest course in the world.

That doesn’t mean it has to be. If you gave Oakmont some kind of golf course tranquilizer—mowed the rough, grew the fairway grass, watered the greens—you’d have another curvy, old-line, private-club course that would stand alongside dozens of other curvy, old-line, private-club courses in the affluent suburbs of Pittsburgh (where Oakmont sits so proudly), Philadelphia, New York City, Rochester, Boston, Chicago and some other cities that enjoyed turn-of-the-last-century megawealth.

But don’t hold your breath. Oakmont’s not getting that makeover. Not now, not ever. Throughout golf, people are talking about making the game kinder and gentler. Everywhere, that is, except Oakmont. Here’s the Oakmont view of the world: First there was Calvinism, then there was golf.

The club’s founder and guiding light, Henry Fownes, believed in hard as a traditional golfing value, and his spirit has pervaded the course ever since its 1903 opening—as a par-80. Hard in every sense: firm (weather permitting) and, more significantly, resistant to scoring. That’s why Johnny Miller’s Sunday 63 in the 1973 U.S. Open is widely regarded as the greatest round ever played. Arnold Palmer, who lived 35 miles down the road in Latrobe, was tied for the lead through three rounds. Miller posted early and watched Palmer play in on TV. Writing about his win years later, Miller said, “When Arnie missed that [four-foot] birdie putt on number 11, it was clear: He couldn’t catch me. He couldn’t shoot one under to tie me or two under to beat me—not at Oakmont under U.S. Open pressure.” Not at Oakmont.

pga tour oakmont pa

For next week’s U.S. Open, Oakmont will play as a par-70. (It’s a 71 for the members.) Despite a wet spring, the sloping greens—the course’s trademark and ultimate defense—are as hard as a dance floor. Bubba Watson’s moonshot 9-irons will land on them with an astounding thud , and you’ll seldom see guys reaching for their ball-mark repair thingies. If some golfing god—Louis Oosthuizen, Zach Johnson, Danny Willett and other experts in on-the-ground golf—should somehow break 280, you will see your share of despairing members in the creaking clubhouse in the dusk of Father’s Day. “If you’re not a sadist when you join the club, you are after a couple of years here,” says Bob Ford, the club’s mild-mannered and longtime pro.

MORE: 18 Most Difficult U.S. Open Venues, Ranked

Fownes, a Pittsburgh iron manufacturer, felt that hard golf built character. Golf to him was not a game that one played . (It was his son, W.C., who famously said, “A shot poorly played should be a shot irrevocably lost.”) In the Fownes era, and ever since, people joined Oakmont seeking punishment, and to this day members don’t want to see their guests with big smiles on their faces. They want them to go forth into the world and spread the word: Hardest course I’ve ever played. The club hires superintendents who understand that tough but fair is as important to Oakmont as trust but verify was to Ronald Reagan. You’ve never seen a halfway house with a better selection of hard stuff.

There are no shade trees at Oakmont. There are next to no trees at all. (Good luck finding something to aim at. It’s Scotland on the Allegheny in stifling heat and, often, no breeze.) Let-up holes? Oakmont doesn’t do let-up holes. You want to go around the course with one ball? Then drive it in the fairway, as Hogan did with his eagle eye and no-glove grip, en route to winning the Open in ’53. (Here are some other winners of major events at Oakmont: Gene Sarazen, Bobby Jones, Sam Snead, Jack Nicklaus, Larry Nelson, Ernie Els and, at the 2007 U.S. Open, Ángel Cabrera, the future Hall of Famer.) Can’t get your ball up fast enough to escape the Oakmont drainage ditches? Dig a ditch in your backyard and learn the shot! Your fourth putt is longer than your third? Welcome to the Oakmont power lip-out, folks. Oh, and whatever you do, do not hold up the group behind you! How about a little common courtesy, people, courtesy being one of the hallmarks of the game?

Oakmont is nothing if not traditional. That’s one of the reasons the USGA has taken its flagship championship, and the hardest event in golf, to Oakmont more than any other course. Oakmont and the USGA—it’s a perfect match! This 116th U.S. Open will be the ninth in the borough of Oakmont, Pa.

Bob Friend, the longtime pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, retired from baseball in 1966 and joined Oakmont five years later. “I’ve been shellacked by Willie Mays, Hank Aaron—some of the greatest hitters ever,” says Friend, now 85. “I’ve been shellacked by Oakmont a heck of a lot more.”

MORE: 39 Father’s Day Gifts for Your Golf-Loving Dad

The righthander’s son, Robert, who played the PGA Tour in the 1990s, grew up caddying and playing at Oakmont, but he entered the club championship only once, as a 21-year-old amateur. He won by 13 shots. “The next year Mr. Ford basically said that I shouldn’t enter, shouldn’t defend my title, that I had moved on,” Robert says. The unspoken part was this: A 13-shot win isn’t Oakmont . You don’t want to send out the wrong message. You know, that golf (for some people anyway) is easy. Oakmont doesn’t do easy.

Oakmont is a country club in name only. It’s not la-di-da. Alex Lawson is a fourth-generation member and the reigning junior club champion. His maternal grandfather, John Birmingham, has been a member for 61 years, and at 76 he shoots or breaks his age routinely. The grandson, now 17 and finishing his junior year at Fox Chapel Area High, can drive the ball 320 yards. He shot 78–66 last year to win the junior title and get grillroom paint, his name in black letters on a gold-tinged wooden board. Do you think his victory got him any respect from the other Oakmont juniors? Not according to Alex: “I bogeyed the last two and they’re like, You choked!” Sixty-six! Tough crowd.

pga tour oakmont pa

Alex’s sister, Emilie, graduated from South Carolina last month. Alex tells a story, with unmistakable glee, about being on the range with Emilie and their grandfather. Emilie was 14, and she and her grandfather were playing closest-to-the-pin to five flagsticks on a mown green surrounded by a firm, fast runoff. The shots were maybe 30 to 70 yards long. Emilie was hitting open-faced wedges, à la Paula Creamer, winner of the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open at Oakmont. Gramps was hitting hooded bump-and-runs, à la Sam Parks. (Birmingham logged many, many rounds with the winner of the ’35 Open at Oakmont.) One bounce and here come the brakes. As Alex tells the story, Grandpa hit it inside Emilie nine of 10 times and said, “‘I’ll beat you nine out of 10 every time if you keep playing shots like that.’ And my sister started crying. Grandpa made her cry!”

Birmingham, who played in the 1968 U.S. Open at Oak Hill but missed the cut, doesn’t deny it. But he has an addendum. “She became a very good player,” he says. “Did you know she won the women’s club championship twice?” Grillroom paint. Alex didn’t include that part. Tough crowd.

By the way, you know how some country-club kids think golf balls grow on trees and give up their searches for strays at about the 42-second mark? Alex is not like that. No Oakmont member is like that. If he hits his ball in the rough—and you are going to hit your ball in the rough at Oakmont—he’s going to find it. When he played the other day, 100 or more Oakmont crew members were on the course, in their khaki pants and white shirts, many of them tending to the rough. That is, watering the rough, measuring its length, looking for thin spots that needed attention. Over the green on the shortish par-3 6th hole (194 yards from the back tee), Alex nodded approvingly as two men raked the long grass in front of the bleachers toward the green. “That’ll make balls bury even deeper!” he said merrily. The kid’s a sadist. He’s an Oakmont member.

Before that after-school round Alex visited with John Zimmers, the Oakmont superintendent, in his office at the back of the range. Like almost everybody at Oakmont of a certain age, Zimmers venerates Palmer and has pictures of him on his walls, some of which were made from felled Oakmont pin oaks when thousands of trees, not part of the original design, were removed from the course between the 1994 and 2007 Opens. When Arnold was a teenager, his father, the course superintendent and head professional at Latrobe Country Club, was offered the job as Oakmont’s superintendent. Arnold was beside himself with excitement. Oakmont! But in the end his father turned down the job, telling his son, “We have everything we need right here.”

MORE: The History of the Stimpmeter Starts at Oakmont

You can draw a straight line from Palmer to Oakmont, including Arnold’s keen appreciation for tough courses and his understanding of heartbreak’s important role in golf. He played in his first U.S. Open at Oakmont, as an amateur in 1953. He played his final U.S. Open at Oakmont, as the game’s most celebrated figure, in 1994. He missed both cuts. He lost the ’62 U.S. Open to 22-year-old Jack Nicklaus in an 18-hole playoff at Oakmont. In ’73 he was in the hunt until late on Father’s Day. Zimmers points to a 2007 picture and says, “This is from Arnold’s last visit here.” You can hear the sadness in his voice.

But before long Zimmers has his game face back on. “Where else is somebody going to shoot 115 without losing a ball!” he says. He’s a wiry man with a shaven head and a good sense of humor. He says, “I like to see people suffer.” His bosses, the club membership, feel the same. “The members will get upset if their guests go home and did not have a miserable time!” Zimmers adds.

pga tour oakmont pa

Then, with a certain solemnity, he shares the memorable words that Palmer passed on to him: “Let Oakmont be Oakmont.” What sage advice.

Alex was listening intently. He doesn’t come to Oakmont to hang out. He comes to work on his game, to play the course through dusk and, this summer, to caddie. The Oakmont mystique for him is not Bobby Jones and Jack Nicklaus and Johnny Miller. He’s like every kid you know, living in the here-and-now. He tells Zimmers, “I’m walking through the locker room, and there was Jim Furyk!” Alex is a Rory man himself. His buddy is a Jason Day guy. They fight about who is better all the time. They haven’t come to blows—yet.

Bob Ford—Mr. Ford to Alex and every young person at Oakmont—is retiring at the end of this year, after 37 years on the job, though he will stay on as director of golf. (In the winter he’s the head pro at Seminole Golf Club, in South Florida.) Ford is a superb player, but the pleasures of Oakmont for him are not the many good scores he has made there but things that are far more amorphous. He speaks of pleasures of a kind : “The view from the back tee on 4, the highest point on the course. Now, with the trees out, you can see practically the whole course from there. The 25 years we lived in the pro’s cottage behind the shop, raising our three kids there.” He goes on in that vein.

Other members and guests and employees cited things that had nothing to do with the brutal nature of the course. Alex talked about Oakmont at sunset, “when the sky turns red and you can see all the humps on the fairways.” (Touch of the poet there, kid!) An employee talked, with a kind of pride, about how you cover up your tats when you come to work “because Oakmont just isn’t a tattoo kind of place.” A caddie, Jeromie Meabon, described being out for two recent practice rounds with Rickie Fowler, Justin Thomas and Smylie Kaufman, “looking at them looking at the course, trying to figure it out, trying to find a way to get in the mix.” Zimmers talked about the beauty of the course’s drainage ditches once the club decided to clean them up and clear out the growth early in his tenure. Mike Davis, the executive director of the USGA, remembered hearing his father talk about how in the 1940s he would play the public course that used to be right next door, “and how he would look at Oakmont’s 2nd green through the fence and just be in awe of its speed.” Birmingham talked about being in the locker that his father started using in 1938. Robert Friend talked about playing in the Druckenmiller Cup, an annual event started by a longtime member and successful investor, Stanley Druckenmiller, and how “after dinner we play shots off the porch teed up on dinner rolls to the 18th green.” Bob Friend talked about bringing his old Pirates teammates—Dick Groat, Ralph Kiner and Bill Mazeroski—to the course. It didn’t matter if everybody shot 100. They were playing the course where Jones and Hogan and Nicklaus had won, and where Palmer did not. Golf, like baseball, is about futility.

Oakmont is not resting on its laurels and its sepia-toned past and the fact that the Stimpmeter was inspired there. (The greens will Stimp at around 13 for the Open. They will be faster for the Druckenmiller Cup.) This is not a club on permanent rewind, not at all. The most famous photograph ever taken at Oakmont is the black-and-white shot of Arnold and Jack coming off the 18th green after their playoff in ’62. Arnold is looking squarely at Jack, who came to Oakmont as both a newly minted pro but also as the reigning U.S. Amateur champion. They’re walking and shaking hands and heading off to some great, unknown future. Alex Lawson has walked by that photograph on a clubhouse wall a thousand times, but he took eight seconds to identify Nicklaus and needed “half-and-half” as a hint to come up with Palmer’s name.

It doesn’t matter. The kid, like all kids, is all about the here-and-now, the here-and-now, the here-and-now. His here-and-now is the U.S Open—at Oakmont. “My buddy’s got an inside-the-ropes pass,” Alex says. “O.K., he claims he does. I’m taking Rory. I just think it’s gonna be Rory.” He’s seen McIlroy on TV plenty, and his grandfather has seen him at Seminole. Now Alex is going to get to watch Rory McIlroy, his golfing hero, live and in person for the first time. His voice is actually quivering.

Yeah, well—what would Rory pay for Alex’s second-round 66 from last year’s junior championship? Plus, grillroom paint.

Joe Skovron and Ludvig Aberg shake hands at Harbour Town.

Oakmont Country Club named second anchor course for U.S. Open; nine future men's and women's Opens to be held in Pennsylvania

  • Associated Press

Copy Link

Already identified by its U.S. Open heritage, Oakmont Country Club was named the second "anchor" course for the U.S. Open in an announcement Wednesday that includes bringing nine U.S. Opens for men and women to Pennsylvania.

Four of them will be at Merion, which was chosen to host the 2030 U.S. Open. That will be the 100-year anniversary of Bobby Jones completing the Grand Slam. The final piece of what was called the "impregnable quadrilateral" in 1930 was the U.S. Amateur at Merion.

The USGA announced the future sites during the U.S. Amateur at Oakmont, the course outside Pittsburgh with a reputation as being among the toughest in America. It already has hosted a record nine U.S. Opens, most recently in 2016 when Dustin Johnson won his first major.

The USGA is moving toward a rotation of golf courses that will get a U.S. Open every five or six years, similar to the British Open rotating to links but different in that it allows other courses not in the rotation to be used.

Pinehurst No. 2 was selected as the first anchor site last year when the USGA decided to move its testing center and museum to the North Carolina Sandhills region.

Pebble Beach, Shinnecock Hills and Winged Foot also are in the discussion to be anchor sites.

Oakmont was an obvious choice. It will host its 10th U.S. Open in 2025. It also will have the U.S. Open in 2034, 2042 and 2049, along with hosting the U.S. Women's Open in 2028 and 2038. Oakmont previously held two U.S. Women's Opens, most recently in 2010 when Paula Creamer won her only major.

Merion, while historic, was thought to not have enough property to host the infrastructure of a U.S. Open. The USGA pulled it off in 2013 when Justin Rose won his lone major.

It now gets two more U.S. Opens, the other in 2050. That will be the 100-year anniversary of Ben Hogan winning the U.S. Open just over a near after a near-fatal car crash. Merion is the site of the iconic photo of Hogan hitting 1-iron into the 18th green during regulation.

Merion also will host the U.S. Women's Open for the first time, in 2034 and 2046.

Both clubs also were awarded some of the USGA's elite amateur events -- Oakmont gets the Walker Cup (2033) and U.S. Women's Amateur (2046), while Merion has the Curtis Cup next year along with the U.S. Amateur in 2026.

The U.S. Amateur this week is the 88th USGA championship in Pennsylvania, the most of any state. Pennsylvania courses have hosted the U.S. Open 17 times, second to New York (20).

Pittsburgh Golf Now

USGA Dubs Oakmont Its Second ‘Anchor Site’ for Championships

'  data-srcset=

OAKMONT, Pa. — The United States Golf Association announced Wednesday that Oakmont Country Club has been deemed its second ‘anchor site’ for enhanced championship involvement, with four men’s U.S. Opens, two women’s U.S. Opens, a Walker Cup and a women’s Amateur all set to occur here over the next three decades.

The 2025 men’s U.S. Open was already scheduled for Oakmont several years back, but this commitment to Pittsburgh’s crown golf jewel takes the relationship between it and the USGA as strong as any such partnership in the nation.

“Becoming a U.S. Open anchor site carries great meaning,” USGA championship chairman Fred Perpall told a crowd gathered in front of the clubhouse. “A celebration and recognition of the history made here, and the longstanding commitment to make history long into the future.

“Oakmont continues to test the best golfers in the world, and this commitment means we will bring our U.S. Open to its storied layout with greater frequency.”

Indeed, the only other ‘anchor site’ the USGA announced previously was Pinehurst in North Carolina, a designation made official last year. Oakmont has previously hosted 16 USGA championships, including nine men’s U.S. Opens.

“It’s a pretty exciting day for all of us here,” said Oakmont CC president Ed Stack, also the CEO of Dick’s Sporting Goods. “Oakmont couldn’t be happier.”

On top of the men’s U.S. Open in four years, Oakmont will also host in 2034, 2042 and 2049. Previous to this, Oakmont has welcomed the men’s U.S. Open roughly once a decade since the 1950s, with the longest gap in that timeframe being 13 years, from 1994 to 2007.

Most recently, Dustin Johnson prevailed at Oakmont in 2016. Past champions include Ángel Cabrera, Ernie Els, Larry Nelson, Johnny Miller, Jack Nicklaus and Ben Hogan.

Oakmont has hosted two U.S. women’s Opens, with Patty Sheehan (1992) and Paula Creamer (2010) hoisting the trophy here. The championship will return in 2028 and 2038.

The Walker Cup, an amateur team competition featuring the best of the United States against Great Britain and Ireland, will pay its first visit to Oakmont in 2033, and the U.S. Women’s Amateur will debut here in 2046.

All in all, the announcement is a validation of Oakmont’s lasting status as one of the toughest tests in championship golf. Designed in 1903 by Henry Fownes, the course features no water hazards and very few trees since a mid-2000s renovation, re-establishing its links-like character.

Even during this week’s U.S. Amateur, it continues to test the best: The 312 stroke-play competitors averaged a score of 76.1 at Oakmont, roughly 6 over par on the par-70 layout.

In short, it’s the perfect place for the unforgiving events favored by the USGA.

“Mr. Fownes was really a genius,” Stack said. “He build this course with the expressed purpose of hosting national championships. As we all know, Oakmont is an exacting test of golf. It’s aligned with the USGA’s mission to identify the best players in the game.”

Keep tabs on the ongoing U.S. Amateur at Oakmont with our championship liveblog !

2021 U.S. AMATEUR: Greensburg’s Goetz Wins Stroke Play Medalist

2021 U.S. AMATEUR: Knapp, Jackson Fall Short of Match Play

'  data-srcset=

A 15-year veteran of sports media, Matt Gajtka (GITE-kah) is the founding editor of PGN. Matt is a lifelong golfer with a passion for all aspects of the sport, from technique to courses to competition. His experience ranges from reporting on Pittsburgh's major-league beats, to broadcasting a variety of sports, to public relations, multimedia production and social media.

pga tour oakmont pa

You may like

pga tour oakmont pa

COVERAGE: Chatfield Relishes Stiff Test at Ohio State’s Scarlet Course

pga tour oakmont pa

GAJTKA: Was I Wrong in Wishing Against a Wyndham Win?

pga tour oakmont pa

Salvitti Optimistic About Game After U.S. Junior Amateur

pga tour oakmont pa

Central Catholic’s Salvitti Advances To Match Play At Junior Am

pga tour oakmont pa

Central Catholic’s Salvitti Makes First USGA Start at Junior Am

pga tour oakmont pa

PGN PAR 4: LIV Golf vs. PGA Tour, Phil’s Return, U.S. Open Preview

Get PGN in your Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Email Address

Moon Golf Club

PGN on Facebook

Follow PGN on Twitter

USGA announces U.S. Open will return to Oakmont in 2025

With the 116th U.S. Open currently underway at Oakmont Country Club, USGA president Diane Murphy announced Saturday that the championship will return to Pittsburgh for a record 10th time in 2025.

"Bringing the U.S. Open Championship to Oakmont for the 10th time in 2025 is testament to the quality of this fine golf course and the longevity of the strong relationship the USGA has with the club," Murphy said. "It is an honor to make this announcement during the 116th U.S. Open when everyone here can celebrate the U.S. Open's return to this iconic course in nine years."

Past U.S. Open winners at one of America's most difficult courses include Angel Cabrera (2007), Ernie Els (1994), Johnny Miller (1973), Jack Nicklaus (1962), and Ben Hogan (1953).

The USGA also announced the 2026 U.S. Open would be held at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, which will also host the championship in 2018.

  • Pendrith claims CJ Cup Byron Nelson for 1st TOUR win
  • Koepka wins LIV Golf in Singapore for 4th victory on circuit
  • Brooks Koepka leads LIV Singapore by 3 after 2nd round
  • 16-year-old Kim youngest to make cut on TOUR since 2015
  • Jake Knapp leads Byron Nelson after 2 rounds

Daily Newsletter

More stories.

THE CJ CUP Byron Nelson - Final Round

  • Brentley Romine ,

General Views of Pinehurst No2 Course

  • Associated Press ,

Bryan2.jpg

Trending Teams

For two locals, specialness of u.s. amateur at oakmont is immeasurable.

  • Brentley Romine

knapp_obrien_split_1920.jpg

It’s one of the great juxtapositions this week at Oakmont Country Club: Two locals, one competing in his 52 nd USGA championship, the other teeing it up for the first time when the 121 st U.S. Amateur begins Monday at the venerable western Pennsylvania club.

Yet, despite the stark contrast of circumstances, the experience of playing a national championship at home will be equally special for both Sean Knapp and Kevin O’Brien.

Knapp, who at age 59 missed being the oldest competitor in the field by a few months, lives just two blocks from Oakmont, where back in the day, fresh off a college-basketball career at Indiana University (Pa.), he caddied for nearly five years. The 2017 U.S. Senior Amateur champion is set for a fourth straight – and 17 th overall – U.S. Amateur, and second at Oakmont. He estimates he still logs three to four rounds per year on the major-championship gem, and he’s played a number of local and state tournaments there, too, winning a couple of them.

To Knapp, there are few places like it.

“There’s a beauty to Oakmont, if you could even call it that,” Knapp said. “It’s more like a difficulty, a genius. Unlike a lot of courses, Oakmont doesn’t need wind, it doesn’t need high rough; it plays like this [firm, fast, extraordinarily tough] every day of the week.

“It’s a beast of a golf course.”

Knapp’s first U.S. Amateur experience at Oakmont, in 2003, remains a career highlight. No, he didn’t lift the Havemeyer, or even make a spirited run for the hometown fans; in fact, he got his teeth kicked in, like many of his peers, and failed to qualify for match play. But, as Knapp put it, while he was in the prime of his career, strangely, “I was just satisfied to be there.”

At the time, Knapp couldn’t have imagined he’d get a second crack at this national championship on Oakmont’s hallowed turf. In his mind, he had a single chance to qualify for what would likely be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“So, I had this inordinate amount of pressure to make it,” Knapp explained. “The singular thought of having a career and then the one time that the Amateur would be in your backyard and not to make it, that would’ve left a void. … And then when I made it, it was almost a letdown to go play. It doesn’t make sense, but that’s just the way it was. I put so much effort into making it, and I just felt like it would be such a tragedy [to not qualify], that when I made it, it was tough to get back up for it.”

O’Brien, albeit decades younger than Knapp, can already relate to the effect of Oakmont’s magnitude. The 26-year-old, who moved to Pittsburgh in the sixth grade, played collegiately at Seton Hall. “Disappointing college career,” O’Brien admits, but Oakmont has always managed to bring out his best.

In high school, he shot his first bogey-free round ever to qualify for the 2014 Pennsylvania State Amateur there, and in the tournament, he lipped out a potential hole-in-one on the sixth hole and drained a seemingly 100-foot eagle putt on the ninth. Seven years later, after several years away from competitive golf while working in the investment and energy industries, he birdied the final hole of his qualifier at Morraine Country Club in Dayton, Ohio – his first national tournament since college – to earn the last spot into this year’s championship, the sixth U.S. Amateur that Oakmont will have hosted.

“It’s always been my favorite course,” O’Brien exclaimed. “Something about this course and me, I’ve always kind of showed up when I see Oakmont circled on the calendar.”

O'Brien

In many ways, like Knapp felt in 2003, just having a spot in the field is a crowning achievement for O’Brien. The path to a USGA-championship tee time included nearly a dozen unsuccessful tries since high school, between qualifiers for the U.S. Amateur, U.S. Open and U.S. Junior. Now living in Findlay, Ohio, and a member at both Findlay Country Club and another vaunted USGA stop in Inverness Club, O’Brien has rededicated himself to competitive golf – he even linked up again with his old coach, Kevin Shields – though finding balance has been slightly tougher. He had to withdraw when his U.S. Open local qualifier bled into a second day earlier this summer because of work obligations.

The hard work, however, has final paid off with, as O’Brien calls it, the cherry on top: He’ll hit the first tee ball Monday morning at Longue Vue Club, the stroke-play co-host, before moving over to Oakmont on Tuesday, and he’ll do so in front of dozens of family and friends, including his mother, Cathy, who lives in nearby Cranberry Township.

“My family has always loved Oakmont,” O’Brien said. “We’ve had some cool moments here. Just to be in this tournament, and to do it this year, is really just unbelievable and a little surreal.

“We’ve been beaming all week [leading up to this], between smiles and tears.”

Both are likely to continue because O’Brien’s USGA debut is equally as emotional as it is special. O’Brien will be staying in his caddie and former high-school teammate Colton Fedell’s guesthouse this week, the same accommodations he had last winter while his father, Patrick, was in hospice care.

After a four-year battle with cancer, Patrick O’Brien died this past February.

“A super guy, touched a lot of people,” O’Brien said, “and missed every day.”

O’Brien especially feels his dad’s absence on the golf course. Patrick, a former college soccer player, could barely break 100 himself, but as his son’s biggest fan and supporter, he was a plus-handicap. One time when Kevin was in high school, Patrick was invited through his work to play Oakmont with PGA Tour player Cameron Percy, but he passed on the opportunity, instead gifting his spot to his son.

“That was the first time I played it,” O’Brien said.

O'Brien

O’Brien now marks his golf ball with his dad’s first initial. When he lines up putts or tees the ball up, he makes sure the ‘P’ is right where the center of the club face is supposed to make contact with the ball. For O’Brien, it’s a constant reminder to not just strike the ball correctly but also to have fun.

“One of things my dad always harped on was how tough I would be on myself, and he always wanted me to just do my best and enjoy it,” O’Brien said. “I always felt like I had some unfinished business or lack of achievement in my college career, and a lot of that was me being pretty hard on myself … and stepping away and not playing as much right after school, I realized just how much I love the game and how much I love competing. … I realized I wanted to give it a shot again.”

Knapp competes these days with a heavy dose of perspective, as well. His oldest daughter, 27-year-old Kensey, followed in her dad’s footsteps by looping multiple seasons at Oakmont while still in school, and she’s been on the bag for her pops for some of his biggest tournaments. When Sean won the U.S. Senior Amateur and received exemptions into the U.S. Senior Open at The Broadmoor and U.S Amateur at Pebble Beach the next year, Kensey drew caddie duties both times.

However, in December 2018, before her final semester at Penn State, Kensey was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“It’s like any parent, you say, ‘Why not me?’ … Here’s this kid who is 24 years old and has her whole future ahead of her,” Sean said back at the 2019 U.S. Senior Open, where Kensey returned to the bag with her cancer in remission.

Kensey will once again put on the caddie bib at this week’s U.S. Amateur. In Sean’s mind, he’ll have one of the best caddies out there.

“It’s not ceremonial,” Sean said. “She knows what she’s doing.”

Knapp

One could say the same for Sean. The veteran Knapp has been around the block more than a few times, but he’s remained relevant in elite amateur golf by putting a permanent senior career on hold. Yes, he plays in the big senior events, but he’s still constantly sharpening his skills against the professional stars of tomorrow.

He belongs to Hannastown Golf Club in Greensburg, about a half-hour from Oakmont. The cozy, golf-focused club boasts many skilled amateurs as members, including three others in this week’s field – Palmer Jackson, Jim Meyers and Mark Goetz.

“At my age, yes, you’ve got to stay in shape, practice and have that support at work and at home,” Knapp said, “but you’ve also got to get in an environment where you’re competing against these young guys so you have a level of belief that you can compete. Even if it’s maybe a 1-in-100 thing; it’s a dream that one time you do it. … There’s going to come a time where I’m going to have to back off, but to this point that’s been the formula that’s dragged me along.”

Knapp qualified for a second U.S. Amateur at Oakmont out of Sunnehanna Country Club, which annually hosts one of the premier summer amateur tournaments. He’s a realist; he knows, on many days, he may not have the game anymore to make what he calls “the toughest cut in golf.”

But he’s going to give it his best shot and use the home-cooking to his advantage. (The first U.S. Amateur winner at Oakmont, in 1919, was Davidson Herron, who used to sell lemonade as a kid from his parents home, which was located just across the street from the club, and went on to beat Bobby Jones in the final.)

“I’m trying to have a little bit different mentality this time [compared to 2003], for whatever that’s worth,” Knapp said. “I’m trying to focus on that it just isn’t enough to make it. … I know it’s a long shot to make match play, but I’m going to enjoy it.”

Knapp

As long as O’Brien remembers his Sharpie, he won’t forget to savor the moment, either. He’s faced – and admittedly wilted under – the pressure throughout his golf career. But when it came time to punch his U.S. Amateur ticket last month, he was unusually patient. Having not looked at the leaderboard for 35 holes, O’Brien finally glanced at his position as he walked up to mark a 15-foot birdie putt at Morraine’s ninth hole, his last. Needing to hole the downhiller to avoid a playoff, O’Brien told his caddie, ‘I’m going to make this thing,’ and he then lined up his ball, struck the ‘P’ perfectly and drained it.

O’Brien let out a yell and pumped his fist before minutes later retreating away to a quiet range.

“One of the first times that I cried since my dad passed,” O’Brien said. “All day I knew I was nervous and was in a big spot to qualify for a tournament that I would give anything to play in, and I told myself to play in a way that would make him proud and the result doesn’t really matter.

“I’d never really pulled through in a moment like that, and without that mental boost, without him on my shoulder there, I don’t think any of that is insignificant.”

There will be 312 competitors tee it up in this 121 st U.S. Amateur, 11 with ties to the Pittsburgh area.

For all of them, it’s an important week.

For most of them, it’s a career highlight.

For at least two of them, it’s everything.

Latest Releases

Thumbnail

2024 Paris Olympics

Paris Logo - Press Box.png

Premier League

PL Press Box.png

NBC SPORTS PRESENTS MORE THAN 50 HOURS OF LIVE TOURNAMENT COVERAGE THIS WEEK, HIGHLIGHTED BY U.S. AMATEUR ON NBC, GOLF CHANNEL & PEACOCK

Live Coverage of 121st U.S. Amateur from Oakmont Country Club Begins Tomorrow at 3 p.m. ET on Peacock & 4 p.m. ET on GOLF Channel

NBC Sports Presents Coverage of Wyndham Championship, Final Event of PGA TOUR’s Regular Season, Beginning Thursday at 3 p.m. ET on GOLF Channel

LPGA Tour Heads to Scotland for Trust Golf Women’s Scottish Open; Live Coverage Begins Thursday at 10 a.m. ET on GOLF Channel

This Weekend, GOLF Channel Presents Coverage of PGA TOUR Champions’ Shaw Charity Classic, European Tour’s Cazoo Classic, and Korn Ferry Tour’s Regular-Season Finale Pinnacle Bank Championship

STAMFORD, Conn. – August 10, 2021 – NBC Sports presents more than 50 hours of live tournament coverage this week across NBC, GOLF Channel, and Peacock, headlined by the 121 st U.S. Amateur and the PGA TOUR’s regular-season finale, the Wyndham Championship.

U.S. AMATEUR

One of the oldest tournaments in the world returns to Oakmont Country Club in Oakmont, Pa., as the game’s best amateur players vie for the Havemeyer Trophy in the 121 st U.S. Amateur. A field of 312 players will play two rounds of stroke play, with the top 64 advancing to match play on Wednesday, Aug. 11.

NBC Sports will present more than 15 hours of live coverage of the 2021 U.S. Amateur across GOLF Channel and Peacock, beginning tomorrow at 3 p.m. ET on Peacock.

Live tournament action from Oakmont Country Club begins with one hour of exclusive coverage on Peacock on Wednesday-Friday leading into live coverage on GOLF Channel. On Saturday and Sunday, GOLF Channel presents live coverage from 3-4 p.m. ET, followed by coverage on NBC from 4-6 p.m. ET.

GOLF Channel and NBC Broadcast Team

  • Play by Play : Steve Burkowski
  • Analyst : Justin Leonard
  • On-Course : Jim Gallagher Jr. / Notah Begay / Jim “Bones” Mackay

How To Watch – Wednesday, August 11 – Sunday, August 15 (all times ET)

  • TV – GOLF Channel, NBC
  • Streaming – Peacock, NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app

PGA TOUR: WYNDHAM CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF Channel presents live early-round coverage of the Wyndham Championship, the final event of the 2020-21 regular season on the PGA TOUR, from Sedgefield Country Club in Greensboro, N.C., on Thursday and Friday and lead-in coverage on the weekend.

The top 125 players on the FedExCup standings after this final event of the 2020-21 regular season qualify for the three-event PGA Tour Playoffs that begin next week at Liberty National in New Jersey.

GOLF Channel Broadcast Team

  • Play by Play : Whit Watson
  • Analyst : Curt Byrum

How To Watch – Thursday, August 12 – Sunday, August 15 (all times ET)

  • TV – GOLF Channel
  • Streaming – NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app; Exclusive early morning coverage Thursday-Friday streams on PGA TOUR LIVE on NBC Sports Gold

Notable Players This Week

  • Patrick Reed
  • Hideki Matsuyama
  • Louis Oosthuizen
  • Tommy Fleetwood
  • Rickie Fowler
  • Bubba Watson

LPGA TOUR: TRUST GOLF WOMEN’S SCOTTISH OPEN

The LPGA Tour returns after a week off for the Olympics as a world-class field travels to the Dumbarnie Links in Scotland for the Trust Golf Women’s Scottish Open.

Live coverage begins on GOLF Channel tomorrow at 10 a.m. ET as Stacy Lewis looks to defend her title.

  • Streaming – GolfChannel.com, NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app
  • Aditi Ashok
  • In Gee Chun
  • Hannah Green
  • Stacy Lewis

PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS: SHAW CHARITY CLASSIC

The PGA TOUR Champions circuit heads to Canada this week for the Shaw Charity Classic from Canyon Meadows Golf & Country Club in Calgary.

Mike Weir , an Ontario native, is expected to play in his first PGA TOUR Champions event in his home country, as GOLF Channel presents delayed coverage Friday evening and live coverage over the weekend.

  • Play by Play : George Savaricas
  • Analyst : Lanny Wadkins
  • Tower: John Cook
  • On-Course : Billy Ray Brown

How To Watch – Friday, August 13 – Sunday, August 15 (all times ET)

  • TV – GOLF Channel,
  • Streaming – NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app
  • Bernhard Langer
  • Vijay Singh
  • Stephen Ames

EUROPEAN TOUR: CAZOO CLASSIC

GOLF Channel presents coverage of the European Tour’s Cazoo Classic from the London Golf Club in Kent, England.

  • John Catlin
  • Rasmus Hojgaard
  • Victor Perez

KORN FERRY TOUR: PINNACLE BANK CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF Channel presents live coverage of the Korn Ferry Tour’s final event of the regular season as the Pinnacle Bank Championship takes place from The Club at Indian Creek in Omaha, Neb.

  • Play by Play : Grant Boone
  • Analyst : Craig Perks
  • On-Course : Tripp Isenhour / Gary Christian

BROADCAST NOTES

  • Golf Central : Golf Central will provide pre- and post-tournament coverage on GOLF Channel Wednesday-Sunday. This week’s Golf Central coverage is anchored by Matt Adams , Billy Kratzert , Brentley Romine , and Kira Dixon . Jaime Diaz and Tripp Isenhour will join tomorrow’s Golf Central .
  • Golf Pick ‘Em presented by FootJoy : NBC Sports’ free-to-play game, Golf Pick ‘Em presented by FootJoy , features a weekly Thursday-Sunday contest for 25 PGA TOUR tournaments this season, each with a $50,000 jackpot, and a special $100,000 jackpot for all four Majors. Golf Pick ‘Em presented by FootJoy is available for download now on the NBC Sports Predictor app powered by PointsBet (available in the App Store and Google Play Store) and at com/Predictor .
  • All GOLF Channel coverage also streams on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app via “TV Everywhere,” giving consumers additional value for their subscription service, and making high quality content available to MVPD customers both in and out of the home and on multiple platforms.

--NBC SPORTS--

Advertisement

Three-down with nine to play, michigan state's james piot comes back to win 121st u.s. amateur at oakmont, share this article.

OAKMONT, Pa. — The first thing James Piot told Michigan State head coach Casey Lubahn when he got on campus was that he wanted to be an All-American. Lubahn laughed at first and suggested to start with All-Big Ten.

“I said, ‘No, coach, I want to be an All-American,’” remembered Piot. “I’ve always had high goals, and that’s been something that has driven me from day one, just going over the top, and they’re paying off now.”

Piot, an honorable mention Ping All-American last season for the Spartans, can now add “national champion” to his list of accomplishments. The Canton, Michigan, native took down North Carolina junior Austin Greaser in dramatic fashion, coming back from three down with nine to play during Sunday’s 36-hole final to win the 121 st U.S. Amateur at Oakmont Country Club, 2 and 1.

“It’s the greatest feeling in the world. I mean, as an amateur it’s the best thing you can do,” said Piot of the win. “It feels phenomenal. Shows the hard work I’ve done is paying off.”

There’s a difference between close matches and good matches, and the morning round was a close match. Neither player had their best stuff early as both Greaser and Piot traded brief leads in their first trip around the famed track outside Pittsburgh. At the afternoon break, Piot held a 1-up lead after earning a conceded birdie on the 18 th hole to card a 2-over 72 (with match play concessions). Greaser was three shots worse at 5-over 75.

“It was one shot at a time. That’s been my mentality this week,” said Piot. “I knew it was going to be a long day, and I told myself, you know, it would be great to get up in the morning, but just keeping it somewhat around even if it was a bad round.

“I feel like I managed it pretty well for how poor I hit it in the morning, and to get a 1-up lead going into the afternoon, I was pretty proud of that.”

In the afternoon, Greaser came out firing with wins on three of the first four holes to flip the match and take a 2-up lead. Piot stopped the bleeding and the two tied the next four holes before Greaser extended his lead with a par on No. 9. Three-up with nine holes to play in the marathon finale, it seemed like the match was Greaser’s to lose. After all, he hadn’t lost a hole in the afternoon round.

Then Piot got to work with wins on five of the next six holes to take a 2-up lead thanks to two birdies and a handful of mistakes from Greaser. The pair traded pars down the stretch before the match ended on the 17th green after a clutch putt from Piot.

“I just felt like from there all the momentum was on my side. I had a lot of people out here who happened to be Michigan State or fans of me somehow, some way, but that definitely — the crowd getting going, and it just felt right from there,” said Piot of how he flipped the match.

That'll do it at Oakmont! @msumensgolf ’s @jamespiot1 is the 121st #USAmateur champion! pic.twitter.com/8FwePI1d7f — USGA (@USGA) August 15, 2021

“Just didn’t execute coming down the stretch. I think it’s pretty obvious,” said Greaser after the match. “He won four holes in a row there and kind of tides changed, and that’s how it goes.”

England's Jack Bigham wins R&A Boys' Amateur Championship on first extra hole

An ambitious james piot keeps on rolling into u.s. amateur final match at oakmont, most popular, 2024 cj cup byron nelson prize money payouts for each pga tour player, 2024 liv golf singapore prize money payouts for each player and team, list of golfers with at least 25 wins on the pga tour includes rory mcilroy, lynch: pga tour stars appear to be gaming the system. is it true doesn’t matter, jack nicklaus played augusta national three times after the 2024 masters. here's what he shot, there's a special meaning behind the caddie bibs at 2024 cj cup byron nelson, best golf balls you can buy in 2024.

  • FOLLOW US ON

LATEST PODCAST

George Bryan on YouTube Fame and Tour Dreams

George Bryan on YouTube Fame and Tour...

  • Registration

Architecture

  • All Courses
  • Public Golf
  • Bang for Your Buck
  • Tournament Venues
  • Eclectic 18 UK
  • School of Golf Architecture

Competitive Golf

  • Paulie's Picks
  • Amateur Golf
  • Credit Hours

Extracurriculars

  • Eggsplorations
  • Andy Johnson
  • Just the Yolk
  • Sunday Brunch
  • Flashback Friday
  • Game of the Week
  • All Newsletter Articles
  • Fried Egg Podcast
  • Fried Egg Stories
  • Shotgun Start Podcast
  • Shotgun Start Spotlights

Oakmont Country Club Plans for Gil Hanse Historic Renovation

One of America's top championship venues prepares for an update

The venerable Oakmont Country Club in western Pennsylvania has plans to undergo a historic renovation by Hanse Golf Course Design during the 2023 golf season.

Hanse’s proposal focuses on rebuilding and reconfiguring Oakmont’s bunkers to match the intentions of founding architect H.C. Fownes as well as expanding greens to their original sizes. The master plan document, obtained by The Fried Egg, summarizes the work as follows: “Gil Hanse’s philosophy focuses on implementing H.C. Fownes’ original architectural intent while improving Member playability and maximizing difficulty for Championship golf.” The plan does not call for the greens to be rebuilt but rather restored through expansion.

One other issue the project proposes to address is the availability of alternate routes of play down adjacent holes. Long-hitting players memorably took advantage of these options during the 2021 U.S. Amateur:

Players are getting creative at Oakmont this week at #USAmateur , taking as many as six alternate driving lines into adjacent fairways: 1 -> 9 3 -> 4 9 -> 1 10 -> 11 11 -> 10 14 -> 12 pic.twitter.com/k6R7HAc6BJ — Brentley Romine (@BrentleyGC) August 13, 2021

The members refer to this as “cross-country golf,” and Hanse’s plan is characterized as “comprehensively” addressing this concern. For example, on holes 10 and 11, the document calls for the current “hook bunker” to be rebuilt and for another bunker complex to be added in order to deter the use of the adjacent hole.

pga tour oakmont pa

Illustration: Cameron Hurdus

Oakmont has hosted nine U.S. Opens, more than any other course, in addition to three PGA Championships, two U.S. Women’s Opens, and five U.S. Amateurs. Last year, the USGA established the course as an “anchor site” and announced that it will be the venue for four U.S. Opens from 2025 to 2049, two U.S. Women’s Opens, a Walker Cup, and a U.S. Amateur.

While the renovation proposal was initiated by the club and not mandated by the USGA as a condition for future championships, the master plan speaks of creating a test that is “as, if not more difficult, for the U.S. Open.”

This enhanced test would come primarily from changes to the bunkers, which Hanse proposes to move in order to keep up with the increased driving distances of today’s top pros and amateurs. In addition to being relocated, Oakmont’s bunkers would be rebuilt to improve drainage and address years of degradation.

The project would run one calendar year, from spring of 2023 to spring of 2024. The club would remain open for play with some disruptions.

Oakmont would be the latest historic major-championship host to work with Hanse Golf Course Design. Other Hanse projects include The Country Club in Brookline, Southern Hills, Winged Foot, Baltusrol, Los Angeles Country Club, The Olympic Club, Aronimink, and Merion.

RELATED ARTICLES

Design notebook: bandon dunes at the quarter-century mark, design notebook: the difficulty of designing a par 3.5, design notebook: coore & crenshaw circa y2k.

Sign up for our free newsletter for fresh takes every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday*

*Our readers make more birdies

Oakmont Country Club

Oakmont Country Club

Play is limited to members at this private facility.

PGA Home Page

PGA of America

The PGA of America is one of the world's largest sports organizations, composed of PGA of America Golf Professionals who work daily to grow interest and participation in the game of golf.

Taylor Pendrith leads Byron Nelson as 1 of several seeking 1st PGA Tour victory

Associated Press

Remove the ads from your TribLIVE reading experience but still support the journalists who create the content with TribLIVE Ad-Free.

Get Ad-Free >

TribLIVE's Daily and Weekly email newsletters deliver the news you want and information you need, right to your inbox.

News Spotlight

IMAGES

  1. Oakmont Country Club and Golf Course (Pittsburgh, PA)

    pga tour oakmont pa

  2. Oakmont CC, Pennsylvania, USA.

    pga tour oakmont pa

  3. US Open heading back to Oakmont in 2025

    pga tour oakmont pa

  4. PGA TOUR 2K21

    pga tour oakmont pa

  5. US Open Oakmont Country Club 1994 2015 PGA TOUR SCHEDULE

    pga tour oakmont pa

  6. Oakmont Country Club Course Tour Photos

    pga tour oakmont pa

VIDEO

  1. Oakmont Country Club

  2. Toughest Course On The PGA TOUR

  3. Oakmont Country Club: Hole No. 6

  4. 726 10th Street, Oakmont, PA

  5. "Oakmont Country Club (Oakmont) " Flyover Tour

  6. Tiger Woods PGA Tour 11 Oakmont CC runthrough

COMMENTS

  1. Oakmont Country Club To Host Numerous Future USGA Events ...

    Oakmont Country Club had previously been designated as the site for the 2025 U.S. Open, but the tournament will also be returning to the historic venue in 2034, 2042, and 2049. The U.S. Women's ...

  2. USGA Championships at Oakmont

    Parks' familiarity with the course helped him traverse the field and claim his first and only PGA Tour victory. He would cap the year off with an appearance on the American Ryder Cup team. The 1953 U.S. Open. The first U.S. Open at Oakmont in the post-WWII years was a cornerstone of Ben Hogan's triple crown season.

  3. U.S. Open 2025 Ticket Packages

    June 12 - 15, 2025. Oakmont Country Club | Oakmont, PA. Experience the 125th running of the U.S. Open Championship at Oakmont Country Club June 12-15. This historic course will host the championship for the 10th time, three times more than any other club! With an Official Ticket Package from USGA Experiences, you'll receive an event ticket plus ...

  4. Oakmont named as second U.S. Open 'anchor site', rota taking shape

    Oakmont Country Club will host four U.S. Opens between now and 2049. OAKMONT, Pa. — A U.S. Open rota is taking shaping. The USGA announced Wednesday morning that Oakmont Country Club will serve ...

  5. Oakmont Country Club to be anchor site for U.S. Open, with 8 more USGA

    The USGA named Oakmont Country Club its second "anchor site" for future USGA championships Wednesday, and the famed course will host the U.S. Open in 2025, 2034, 2042 and 2049, as well as

  6. U.S. Open Future Sites

    2033: Oakmont Country Club - Oakmont, Pa. June 16-19, 2033. The U.S. Open will return to Oakmont for a record 11th time in 2033. It will also be the club's 20th USGA championship, which ranks one behind fellow Pennsylvania venue Merion Golf Club for the most all time. ... Pebble Beach, which is the annual site of the PGA Tour's AT&T National ...

  7. US Open: Look Inside Oakmont Reveals Members With Respect for Game

    The righthander's son, Robert, who played the PGA Tour in the 1990s, grew up caddying and playing at Oakmont, but he entered the club championship only once, as a 21-year-old amateur. He won by ...

  8. Home

    Oakmont Country Club. The ultimate examination of Championship golf. View Course Tour

  9. USGA declares Oakmont Country Club a second championship ...

    Oakmont, the famed course near Pittsburgh, will be a second "anchor site" for future USGA championships and will host the U.S. Open in 2025, 2034, 2042 and 2049. Across the state just outside Philadelphia, Merion Golf Club in Ardmore was also awarded the U.S. Open in 2030 and 2050. Pinehurst Resort was named the USGA's first anchor site ...

  10. Oakmont Country Club named second anchor course for U.S. Open; nine

    Both clubs also were awarded some of the USGA's elite amateur events -- Oakmont gets the Walker Cup (2033) and U.S. Women's Amateur (2046), while Merion has the Curtis Cup next year along with the ...

  11. USGA Dubs Oakmont Its Second 'Anchor Site' for Championships

    OAKMONT, Pa. — The United States Golf Association announced Wednesday that Oakmont Country Club has been deemed its second 'anchor site' for enhanced championship involvement, with four men's U.S. Opens, two women's U.S. Opens, a Walker Cup and a women's Amateur all set to occur here over the next three decades. The 2025 men's U.S. […]

  12. World's best golfers to face more daunting test after renovations at

    Oakmont Country Club has made numerous changes over the years. After the 1994 U.S. Open, the club membership decided to remove more than 10,000 trees from the course, returning to Fownes ...

  13. Oakmont Country Club

    Oakmont Country Club is a country club in the eastern United States, located mostly in Plum with only a very small portion of the property located in Oakmont, suburbs of Pittsburgh in western Pennsylvania.Established 121 years ago in 1903, its golf course is regarded as the "oldest top-ranked golf course in the United States."

  14. USGA announces U.S. Open will return to Oakmont in 2025

    With the 116th U.S. Open currently underway at Oakmont Country Club, USGA president Diane Murphy announced Saturday that the championship will return to Pittsburgh for a record 10th time in 2025 ...

  15. For 2 locals, Oakmont U.S. Am special

    It's one of the great juxtapositions this week at Oakmont Country Club: Two locals, one competing in his 52 nd USGA championship, the other teeing it up for the first time when the 121 st U.S. Amateur begins Monday at the venerable western Pennsylvania club.. Yet, despite the stark contrast of circumstances, the experience of playing a national championship at home will be equally special ...

  16. Jim Furyk returns to home state in U.S. Senior Open title defense

    OAKMONT, PA - JUNE 19: Jim Furyk of the United States waves to the gallery as he walks off the 18th green during the final round of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club on June 19, 2016 in ...

  17. Oakmont Country Club reopens gift shop, features 2025 U.S. Open

    Peter Macadam, an assistant caddy master and member of the professional staff at Oakmont Country Club, folds 2025 U.S. Open Championship T-shirts at the club's gift shop in Plum on Saturday ...

  18. Nbc Sports Presents More Than 50 Hours of Live Tournament Coverage This

    Live Coverage of 121st U.S. Amateur from Oakmont Country Club Begins Tomorrow at 3 p.m. ET on Peacock & 4 p.m. ET on GOLF Channel NBC Sports Presents Coverage of Wyndham Championship, Final Event of PGA TOUR's Regular Season, Beginning Thursday at 3 p.m. ET on GOLF Channel LPGA Tour Heads to Scotland for Trust ...

  19. Photos: 121st U.S. Amateur at Oakmont Country Club 2021

    Three-down with nine to play, Michigan State's James Piot comes back to win 121st U.S. Amateur at Oakmont. The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported. OAKMONT, Pa. — The first thing James Piot told Michigan State head coach Casey Lubahn when he got on campus was that he ...

  20. Oakmont Country Club Plans for Gil Hanse Historic Renovation

    T he venerable Oakmont Country Club in western Pennsylvania has plans to undergo a historic renovation by Hanse Golf Course Design during the 2023 golf season. Hanse's proposal focuses on rebuilding and reconfiguring Oakmont's bunkers to match the intentions of founding architect H.C. Fownes as well as expanding greens to their original sizes.

  21. Oakmont Country Club

    Play golf at Oakmont Country Club, located at 1233 Hulton Rd Oakmont, PA 15139-1135. Call (412) 828-4653 for more information.

  22. Next on the Tee: John Mahaffey recalls winning '78 PGA Championship at

    John Mahaffey of Kerrville, Texas, holds his trophy cup after winning the PGA Championship at Oakmont Country Club, Pa., on Aug. 6, 1978.

  23. PGATOUR.COM

    The official web site of the PGA TOUR. Providing the only Real-Time Live Scoring for the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Korn Ferry Tour. Home of official PGA TOUR

  24. Taylor Pendrith leads Byron Nelson as 1 of several seeking 1st PGA Tour

    The Canadian was one of six among the top 10 on the leaderboard seeking a first tour victory at the CJ Cup Byron Nelson. Pendrith chipped in twice for consecutive eagles to kick-start an 8-under ...