Honda X-ADV - the Adventure Scooter! ... a road test.

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I was lucky to have the new adventure scooter from Honda for a week. I'd just come back from a trip around Iceland on a R1200 GS and have previously ridden across the world on a 105cc Honda step-through. I have no allegiance to either big bike or small, and so was curious about this new adventure scooter, as I've always looked at machines such as the Suzuki Burgman as potentially the perfect bike for going around the world on. They have excellent luggage capacity, good weather protection and are practical and versatile in a way that even proper 'adventure' bikes are not.

So an adventure scooter seemed like the perfect recipe.

A PROPER MOTORCYCLE

The X-ADV is actually a proper motorcycle. The fact that it is chain driven (rather than belt) and has the engine up at the front means that it doesn't qualify as a scooter, and fundamentally is nothing more than a NC750, reimagined to look like a scooter, with the X-ADV itself based on the Integra that Honda started out their hybrid moto-scooter experiments with.

So the engine is the same 745cc parallel twin as in the NC750 range, given an extra 500rpm in this instance in order to give it a sportier ride, and fitted with the latest fourth generation dual clutch transmission gearbox (DCT). Much else is new on the bike. There's a new cast aluminium swingarm, tubeless spoked rims (17-inch front, 15-inch rear) fitted with Bridgestone Trail Wing tyres, as well as a new headlight and fairing design that go some way to justifying the fact that this DCT equipped X-ADV is nigh on £2500 more than an equally engined NC750. £9599 is the damage.

It's a serious amount of money and reinforces the notion that Honda doesn't see the X-ADV as a volume seller in the way that the NC750 is, but instead a niche, low volume machine that was born out of the curious minds of Honda engineers who thought that building an Integra that could ride the rough trails down to the local beach was a good idea. But was it?

The first thing about the X-ADV is how difficult it is to get on. I'm 5'10 but really struggled to get my leg up and over , mainly because of what is quite a tall wide seat, rising from the 790mm of the Integra to a new height of 820mm, with ground clearance also increasing from 135mm to a more lofty 162mm. You can't step-through it either as the engine and black, easily scuffed, cowling are in the way. You have to approach it like a regular motorcycle and even then I couldn't find a way to get on it cleanly, especially with the top box fitted. It's a bit disappointing as you would imagine the main market for this kind of bike is the older rider struggling to get on a big bike and seeing something like the X-ADV as an alternative. A chap I was riding with had just had a new knee and really struggled to get on and off. To me, he would, and should, have been the main market for this bike.

Otherwise, once on the X-ADV doesn't feel as heavy as its wet weight figure of 238 kilos would suggest. It feels light and manoeuvrable in a way that an equally weighted Africa Twin or GS might not. There are some nice touches to it as well. The screen adjustment mechanism works well and is simply enough to use, though does at times require two hands. The keyless ignition – whilst not for me as I prefer the simplicity of a key – is a nice nod towards modern functionality, with an ignition dial in the centre of the console turning the bike to on, or off, or to the position which allows you to toggle open either the fuel flap or underseat storage latch by means of a rather flimsy plastic rocker switch. Under the seat the 21-litre storage area has just enough room for a non-peaked helmet, as well as a 12v socket and a torch to illuminate your luggage. It's not as practical as a big scooter, but it is more practical than a typical motorcycle. A glovebox would have been nice.

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12v charger in X-ADV's 21-litre underseat storage bin

The X-ADV is a DCT six-speed gearbox only, with no manual option available. This is now fourth generation DCT and it does feel that bit smoother than the bikes I've ridden equipped with it in the past. On the right switchgear you control the bike from neutral, to Drive to Sport. Sport holds the gears longer and downshifts earlier. In either of these modes the bike is working as a full automatic and does a good job of it, with often imperceptible changes (though does sometimes leave you in the wrong gear when cornering). On the right switchgear there's also a toggle to flick the bike into manual mode. This brings into play the forefinger and thumb operated buttons on the left switchgear; the forefinger to go up a gear (where the headlight flash would usually be), the thumb to go down a gear.

Once selected, the bike remains under manual operation, over-ridden only when you decelerate and don't change down, at which point the system will automatically drop the gears with the engine revs. You can also bring the manual gear change buttons into play at any time, over-riding both Drive or Sport mode, the auto system kicking back in after approximately 10 seconds. This was how I preferred to ride the bike; Drive mode, full auto, and if needed the manual toggles to override the bike's brain to change up or down, and then allow auto to kick back in again. It's a good system. It suits the X-ADV and comes without complaint. The only niggle is Sport mode. All this does is hold onto gears longer than in Drive and the nature of the low-revving parallel-twin engine means that it makes more noise but not necessarily more speed, as most of the surge has gone by 4250rpm. Leave it in Drive would be my suggestion.

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DCT operation is same as on Africa Twin and NC750; Neutral, Drive, Sport... then a button to toggle between auto and manual

PERFORMANCE

In terms of performance the 54 bhp X-ADV feels oddly more sluggish than a NC750 (which only weighs 8 less at 230 kilos). Perhaps it's the riding position that doesn't give the same sense of speed, or maybe that the engine in this test bike was low mileage and still needed bending in. You would describe the X-ADV as brisk but not much more. Having said that it'll sit all day at high motorway speeds, top out at about 110mph and achieve economy figures of around 70mpg, even when ridden reasonably hard. Fuel capacity isn't exceptional at 14.1-lites, but with such good economy it should be able to manage over 200 miles to a tank if ridden frugally. Plenty of range for most trips.

As well as the new swingarm, the X-ADV also gets new 41mm upside down front forks with adjustment for rebound and preload, whilst front brakes are radially-mounted Nissin calipers taken from the Africa Twin, fitted with twin 310mm discs. The rear shock is now adjustable for preload. It's a big step up from the equipment on the NC750 and and Integra and goes part way to justifying the extra £2150 the X-ADV costs over the DCT equipped NC750X and the £1270 over and above the price of an Integra.

The bike certainly handles well – better than you were imagining – with quick turn in and a supple but controlled ride. I definitely noticed the improved quality of the suspension over the NC750, which can get out of shape quite quickly, especially along bumpy roads. Nice wide bars that looked to be taken from the Africa Twin also give good leverage for tipping into tight turns. It is a strange sensation initially having your feet up in the air to the front of you, but you do get used to it. The X-ADV's longer wheelbase over the NC750X (1590mm plays 1525mm) also makes it a surprisingly stable bike at speed and overall the handling is a lot of fun. At full elevation, the adjustable screen also offers good wind protection and the exhaust note from the upswept can is surprisingly burbly.

I also liked that the rear brake was handlebar mounted in the position you would usually find the clutch. This worked well with the DCT gearbox, allowing you to trail brake the rear when doing tight manoeuvres on partial throttle, almost using the back brake as a clutch. It's a feature that would work well on the DCT equipped Africa Twin, which can be a bit tricky to manoeuvre at slow speeds, trying to feather the throttle or use your right boot to drag the rear brake. The set up on the X-ADV is preferable, with a discreet pull on parking brake tucked away inside the right fairing cowl.

The uprated brakes of the X-ADV also work well, with good stopping power and effective – and possibly a touch oversensitive - ABS, especially on gravel surfaces. It is a shame you can't disengage ABS, particularly at the rear, as that would make for a lot of fun in the dirt, especially with the bike's inherent stability at low speeds. Possibly the removal of a fuse would do it, though Honda do tend to err on the side of caution with such things. Traction control isn't an option on the X-ADV, so at least you can spin up the rear for a dramatic gravel road take off, whilst on road the moderate performance is unlikely to catch you out on a wet corner.

Handlebar mounted rear brake a good addition

Hand operated rear brake is much better for slow speed manoeuvring than Africa Twin's foot brake

Having taken the bike on a 300 mile round trip to the Peak District I did find the seat became uncomfortable after an hour or so in the saddle, though I imagine a bit of that is getting accustomed to the riding position, which places more pressure on the backside and less on the feet than the adventure style of bike I usually ride. For pillions, I didn't get to test the rear seat but it is nice sizeable pad and probably makes the X-ADV better suited for two up riding than the NC750. As long as the pair of you can get on.

During my time with the bike I explored a few familiar dirt trails. The biggest limitation for off-road riding is the fact that it's a bike not designed for standing up on. Your feet on the narrow running boards are too far forward and anyone of any normal height won't be able to stand up straight enough to get any real control, or weight over the front of the bike. You're left in almost in a crouching position. You can get after-market off-road footpegs, which bolt in the position where the footrests would be on the NC750. A Honda rep said these made the bike much 'better' in the dirt, which I could well imagine, because to be fair the suspension copes with moderate bumps and ridges, the DCT gearbox makes off-road life easy, and despite a 17-inch front wheel (and 15-inch rear) the bike will bob along your average rutted fire track just fine... as well as most bikes to be honest.

In fact, having watched another rider on it – one with a good deal of confidence off-road – you can make the X-ADV really push on along gentle gravel trails, engaging in controllable drifts, with a lot of fun to be had in the process by the looks of it. The bike's obviously got its limits, and Honda's claim of it being an off-road scooter are clearly misguided, but to say that it 'can't' go off road is a bit inaccurate. It can, you just probably wouldn't choose that bike for the job. Plus, as I found, it can get quite costly if you drop it. A simple fall off the stand saw dinted exhaust cowl, broken hand guard which pushed in and snapped the brake lever clean off, and a scuffed running board, though metal protectors are available to give those more protection. But in a way that's a mirror of all 'adventure' bikes these days. They can all do it – to some extent – but the standard equipment is rarely up to the job of it.

THIS OR AN AFRICA TWIN?

During my time with the X-ADV I had time to ride it alongside a current model Africa Twin and surprisingly in this company the adventure scooter was cast in a brighter light than it was when stood on its own. Riding the two back to back along twisting country roads and on gentle off-road trails made you realise how over-sized and sometimes cumbersome the big adventure bikes can be. In tight spaces they can feel unwieldy. To people unfamiliar with them, riding in unfamiliar terrain they can feel overly tall, heavy and intimidating. The X-ADV was the opposite. Along tight lanes you could really push on and enjoy the bike's flickability and easy manoeuvring. On the gentle trails you could enjoy the fact your feet – and the centre of gravity – were closer to the ground and everything felt that bit more stable. It was not only more user friendly - especially for the novice - but also more fun.

Obviously there'd be no comparison in comfort and capability if you were choosing a bike to take on a long European jaunt, or even further afield. The extra space, and pace, not to mention the convenience of hard luggage would make you pick the Africa Twin any day, unless perhaps you were in no hurry and were happy to explore the backroads and have a bike a little less committed to hardcore adventuring.

Honda labels the X-ADV as a city adventure bike and I think that's about right. It's at its best in short, tight environments, and even if you never take the bike off-road the longer travel suspension still makes it ride the bumps and potholes of modern roads than much better than a regular scooter, or NC750X for example. Is it worth the extra money over the NC750X? Probably not, not in practical terms, but the X-ADV does have a prestige and a presence about it, not to mention the superior quality brakes and suspension. I did at times feel a bit silly on the X-ADV. I was conscious of its showy graphics and its blurred relationship between bike and scooter. Some other bikers didn't know what to make of it. I think you need to be a confident character to ride a X-ADV, because people do look, and will pay it some interest, positive or otherwise.

The question is whether it's really answered the question of a scooter being used as an adventure bike. I look at the figures for the Suzuki Burgman 650 or Yamaha T-MAX 530, and wonder if the X-ADV has really added anything over those two bikes. The Burgman in particular has over twice as much underseat storage space than the X-ADV, and then there's maintenance free belt drive that would be a blessing on the long hauls. Even the Integra – the X-ADV's foundation block – is arguably more practical for a big trip, for the fact that side panniers can be fitted to it, whereas the X-ADV only takes a top box. I'd probably prefer the Integra's key ignition over the X-ADV's key-less as well, but then the Integra wouldn't ride as well over the bumps and wouldn't have the ground clearance, so it's all a much of a muchness, and down to what you need from a bike.

Attempting to weigh up the X-ADV pragmatically and objectively is never going to work. It's not a bike that adds up on paper. To some people it'll never add up at all. For them it's always going to be too expensive, too gaudy, too lacking in purpose to make it a proper adventure bike in the way historically we've imagined an adventure bike (knobbly tyres, big front wheel, cheap to buy, simple to fix). But if you accept if for what it was designed as – a bike to use all week on the city commute and to then head off on the weekend with a bike capable of taking you along the path down to the beach – then it makes a lot more sense. It's probably never going to be someone's only bike. I imagine most will be bought as a second bike – something to complement a GS or Africa Twin because ultimately those bikes are more versatile than the X-ADV is ever going to be.

It's a shame it's not easier to get on and off. It's a shame those off-road pegs don't come as standard and it's a shame it's not as practical as a proper large capacity scooter, but you still have to give credit to a company for putting their head on the block and building a bike they must have known was never going to make them much money, or even sell in any volume. It takes a bit of guts to build a bike like that. You could say it takes a bit of an adventurous spirit. Ultimately, the X-ADV is not the bike for me. It's not a bike I would buy with my own money. But that doesn't mean it's not a bike for someone out there, and in all honesty, the more you ride it, the more you start to like it.

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Fuel filler under a plastic cover. The central black plastics do scuff easily and are easily caught when trying to 'step through'.

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Screen adjustment can take two hands. The pull out lever doubles up as a coin holder.

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Neat handbrake nestled in the front fairing

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The keyless ignition 'switch' adds a touch of modern sophistication. But is it necessary?

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Chain drive helps define it as a motorcycle rather than scooter, and adds to the maintenance routine.

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New dash is modern and easy to read.

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Tubeless rims a nice touch, similar in style to those on a R1200 GSA.

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Light in the underseat storage bin is a neat touch

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Honda X-ADV (2019) - Long-term test - Part two

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BikeSocial Publisher since January 2017. Riding for 40 years, writing about motorcycles professionally for 27 of them and has written for, edited or published most of the UK’s best known bike magazines. Ridden and reviewed pretty much every significant roadgoing motorcycle of the last 40 years, owned more than 100 bikes (currently has four in the garage), is addicted to motorcycle classifieds and appears to be a walking Glass’s Guide for motorcycle pricing. Cried when Bike Trader stopped publishing a weekly publication.

Strangely attracted to riding high miles in all weathers, Steve sees motorcycles as putting the fun into functional, finds track days ‘confusing’ and describes the secret to better riding as ‘being invincible’. 

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2019 Honda X-ADV long term test part two

Let’s play fantasy bike buying. Just supposing you were the kind of wide-eyed optimist that decided living in the place you’d always wanted was worth the sacrifice of a 150-mile commute (each way) to the office, what bike would you choose?

I may be that idiot and did recently spend a whole lot of time working out what the best bike might be for that trip. It didn’t take long to realise I’d need something comfy, with a big fairing, but not so big as to get wedged between trucks when filtering in night time rush hours (have you ever noticed how traffic squeezes itself together towards the white lines when darkness comes, taking a foot of our ‘motorcycle lane’ away?

Clearly my new bike has to be able to cruise easily at motorway speeds with a little in reserve for something I can’t quite justify right now, but I’d also prefer it to do at least 60mpg, not wear out tyres too quickly and be cheap to run. Some kind of luggage capacity for a laptop, change of clothes and a toothbrush too (because some days the weather/fatigue prevents my ageing bones from doing the return leg), shaft or belt drive, (or an enclosed chain), a light clutch and easy gear change and build quality that will see out the other side of several winters regardless of the mileage.

That’s a long list, headed initially by BMW’s largely forgotten K1300GT, followed by their definitely-not-forgotten (and plentiful secondhand) R1200RT, with Yamaha’s FJR1300 in third place.

All three big tourers fit the bill on all counts (apart from mpg and maybe the width when filtering). They’ll all do 50mpg and a half-decent example showing less than 50,000 miles can be bought for £5k…ish.

2019 Honda X-ADV long term test part two

Comfy, capable and cool too. Is Honda’s 70mpg X-ADV the perfect commuter?

In another world my own 40,000 mile Fazer 1000 does much of that, with half the width, 70kg less mass and only owes me £1650, but doesn’t have shaft drive or luggage. Don’t ask why – and I know half of motorcycling hates this bike while everyone who bought one loves it – but I kept thinking about Honda’s NC750, which costs almost the same when new as a ten year old BMW tourer. And then I remembered the funky X-ADV scootercycle, which is essentially an NC750 with better suspension, build quality that only Honda do, 75mpg however you ride it, a big screen, reasonable weather protection and the kind of ‘what the heck’ personality that makes me chuckle.

Plus, the X-ADV is a cool example of motorcycle-as-utility and I like that. A brand new functional-but-funky piece of properly built urban loopiness for just, er,…how much?

2019 Honda X-ADV long term test part two

It’s not a scooter, but not entirely a motorcycle either. Scootycle maybe?

The X-ADV’s £10k list price is a lot of cash for a 54bhp NC750 wearing combat trousers. But that’s no more than the top-spec BMW or Yamaha maxi-scooters, a lot less than Yamaha’s ‘don’t-call-me-a-scooter’ Niken and the Honda has a DCT gearbox as standard, which I love. Plus, if you shop around there are pre-registered, zero-mile X-ADVs out there for a lot less than list price

Because it’s a new bike I could borrow one from Honda before making up my mind (and an FJR1300 too, more of which later). So far, it’s working very well some kind of vindication for the idiot who took on Britain’s daftest commute (actually, I used to manage a bloke on a scooter magazine who did a longer trip than mine on a 50 year-old 15bhp Lambretta – that is Britain’s daftest commute).

The X-ADV takes a little getting used to. The riding position is quirky; legs forward, like a ski-lift not a chopper. The handlebars look tall and wide but are low enough that the mirrors high-five the vans when filtering.

2019 Honda X-ADV long term test part two

If it were a dog the X-ADV would be a Staffie/Jack-Russell cross

That’s it as far as the niggles go though, once you’ve got used to the position, every trip on the X-ADV is an exercise in relaxing efficiency, stunning economy and madcap passive-aggression. Somehow, you discover it only takes 54bhp to be at the front of every queue.

It’s easy to forget that for many riders getting around on two wheels is a simple matter of utility. Just because the daylight disappears for a few months doesn’t stop motorcycling being the smartest way to get from here to there. Bikes like the Honda make this practical because they just get on with it, while resisting the urge to dissolve at the first sign on salt.

Yes, the headlights could be better (could be much better in fact) and the width of the seat and full-length running boards makes its 820mm seat height feel taller than it is. Our bike has Honda’s heated grips fitted, which don’t so much heat your fingers as prevent them getting too cold (there’s a big difference). Which might sound like a bit of a moan. Niggles would be a better word and they all disappear when, at the end of a biblically-wet three hours in the saddle, I come to the tight, bumpy right hand bend at the top of the hill near my house and glide around it in complete confidence despite the speedo showing a number that starts with a seven.

A couple of weeks on Yamaha’s 144bhp FJR1300 left the Honda feeling a little gutless for the first few miles, but then you get back into the hang of manually changing down gears on the DCT semi-automatic gearbox when you need some extra oomph and settle back into a ride where you flow with the traffic instead of riding the tail lights of the car in front.

What really hammers home the brilliance of the Honda is when you stop to fill up and realise you’ve used a whole gallon less than the FJR1300 to do the same 150-mile journey in pretty much exactly the same time.

If we all bought bikes based on the numbers, then we’d all be riding around on Yamaha Fazer 1000s. In the same way as if we all chose dogs by numbers no one would have the two daft, mis-shaped mutts waiting for me to drip seven counties of rain onto the rug in five minutes time.

Thankfully we have more imagination than that.

2019 Honda X-ADV long term test part two

Three things we like about Honda’s X-ADV

  • It makes me smile
  • 70mpg without trying
  • The handling

Three things we’re still not sure about

  • Hard to get your feet down
  • Headlights could be better at speed
  • Much more expensive than the NC750 it is based on

2019 Honda X-ADV spec

Looking for motorcycle insurance? Get a quote for this motorbike with Bennetts bike insurance

  • Honda X-ADV review 2017 UK road test
  • Honda X-ADV (2019) - Long-term test - Part one
  • Blog: Honda DCT; biking’s biggest (and most misunderstood) step forward

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Yamaha Long term test: Honda X-ADV adventure scooter

Honda X-ADV

We’ve got Honda’s wacky scoot on urban adventure duties for a few months

EVERY NOW and then, someone comes up with a new class of bike. BMW arguably did it for usable big adventure bikes with its R1100 GS (the R100 and R80 G/S models were something else I’d say – niche mad things). Kawasaki’s ZZ-R1100 started the hypersports top-speed weapon, Triumph’s Speed Triple the super-naked roadster, Honda’s CBR900RR FireBlade the litre superbike that handled, Honda’s Silver Wing the big-bore super-scooter.

It’s been a while since we’ve had anything really really new like those revolutionary, class-defining machines. But what about this beastie? Honda launched the X-ADV as an ‘adventure scooter’ a few years back now, and it’s fair to say I was a bit unsure about it. It seemed to ask more questions than it answered – and the questions it did answer didn’t seem to be the ones I’d ever heard being asked. If you get my drift... Long(ish)-travel suspension, spoked rims, dirt-style wheels, some extra ground clearance all points to some offroad usability. But the close-fitting front mudguard, 17” front wheel and 238kg-ish wet weight all sort of point against that. It’s all a bit weird, frankly, and the price tag of nearly £10k doesn't help. My mate Dave summed it up when he said, “It’s like looking at a bike after taking a load of acid.” True dat Dave.

Honda X-ADV

Our man David Miller borrowed the X-ADV first, planning some offroad shenanigans on it (the dirt trail is his arena nowadays), but then hurt his shoulder, so the poor ‘onda sat for a couple of weeks at Miller Towers, unmoving. Luckily I had to return the Kymco AK550 to a very nice man north of London, so could pick up the mighty X-ADV near Peterborough at the same time.

Honda Africa Twin vs BMW R1200GS Adventure Bike Review | Bike Comparison

No matter though – I’m getting used to all this stuff on modern bikes, and so I just jump on and head south. I’ve ridden DCT bikes a few times, so quickly remembered the scoop in terms of the pushbuttons – you start in neutral, then click into D for drive then S for sport. The up and down buttons let you override the auto gear choice, and there’s also a button for full manual operation. So far so good.

Clicking through the dash display, I come across the odometer, which is reading just 45 miles. Eek, a brand spanker! That probably explains the slightly tight-feeling motor and transmission then. I try to take it easy till she warms up at least, then get up to ramming speed on the motorway asap. The X-ADV uses Honda’s 745cc parallel twin, which is (in)famously made from half a Jazz car engine. It’s used on the NC range – the NC750S and NC750X, where it does decent if slightly uninspiring work as a frugal commuter and midi-adventurer. It’s a weird motor – the inlet and exhaust ports are siamesed, so there’s only one exhaust downpipe and air inlet, which confuses at first sight. A single overhead camshaft, with screw and locknut finger tappets takes us back to the 1970s in terms of tech – but it’s all probably fine for an economy-minded engine tune. It sort of clashes a little when we get to the megabucks high-tech DCT gearbox mind, but we’ll let that slide for the moment.

The essence of all this is about 54bhp on tap – not a bad amount for a super-scooter, and about the same as the AK550 I just jumped off (but which felt much zippier) that’s also about the same as a Burgman 650, so they’re all going to hit about 110mph+ flat-out on a high-speed run. The X-ADV was a bit down on this at the moment due to its low miles of course, so we’ll be hoping it picks up in terms of zip and go.

The A1/M25/A3 run didn’t tell me much, except that the X-ADV is a bit scant in terms of wind and weather protection. The adjustable windshield is a good thing but I think if I had one of these full-time, I’d want a bigger screen, especially for winter. The seat is comfy enough, but there’s not loads of space for your legs and feet, which goes against the super-scooter concept a bit. 

Back in London, I’ve been using the X-ADV for local scooting jobs, putting a kid on the back for deliveries to parties and the like, and popping round to the shops (and my mate Neil Handley's cafe near Box Hill ). It’s actually a lot of fun to ride in town, the brakes are very good (twin radial four-potters up front ftw), and the BridgestoneTrail Wing tyres also work well round town, in the current hot dry conditions anyway. It handles well, and the only chassis woes come from the seat being just that bit too tall for me, so I can only really get one tiptoe down at a standstill. It’s fine on the move, but if you’re short and unsteady on tall machines, this won’t help you out much.

Honda X-ADV

The motor has good low-down punch, the DCT helps ease the strain of urban riding and the keyless ignition works a lot better than the recent Kymco one we tried, with the system lighting up immediately when you push the big button on the bike. You still end up losing track of the keys though (well I do). The fuel consumption isn’t amazing, partly because I’ve been flat out on it for most of our time together, plus the engine is still quite tight. We’re averaging about 49mpg at the moment – hopefully that will improve a little.

We’ll be running the X-ADV for the next couple of months, and will keep reporting back on how it’s going. We might even attempt some sort of gentle off-roading antics with it. Or we might not…

road trip x adv

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Disclaimer - Images shown are a mixture of the current and previous year model.

Honda X-ADV - 3-quarter front ride, with rider, between city and forest, grey bike

ON THE EDGE OF THE ROAD

Our X-ADV leads the way. Combining the capabilities and performance of an adventure motorcycle, with the comfort, convenience and commuting ability of a large-capacity scooter, it’s a two-wheeled SUV that defies convention.

X-ADV dynamic on road

Infinite adventure around every corner

A premium urban explorer, capable of going from city block, to off-road trail (and back) in a heartbeat. The X-ADV turns every single ride into a unique experience. A tubular steel diamond-style frame, combined with the steering geometry and long travel suspension provides light and agile handling. The redesigned seat makes ground reach easier and new bodywork heightens a rugged style that the X-ADV has made its own.

X-ADV dynamic on road

Designed to support you

Throttle By Wire (TBW) control and four default riding modes optimise performance to suit conditions and terrain. And the X-ADV is flexible – you have the option to fully customise engine output and character, as well as the Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) shifting schedule, Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) and ABS level. In all default road riding modes, the ABS level is high; with GRAVEL mode selected ABS level is low, for efficient and consistent braking on loose surfaces. The rear indicators feature Emergency Stop Signal (ESS), which flashes the rear hazards under extreme braking.

X-ADV dynamic on road

No matter the terrain

Long-travel, 41mm cartridge-style Up Side Down (USD) front forks adjust for spring preload and rebound damping. They provide superb bump absorption on broken tarmac or rutted trails, and everything in between. The lightweight aluminium swingarm operates a single-tube, split-pressure monoshock, adjustable for spring preload to maintain optimum steering ability when loaded. The 17-inch front wheel and 15-inch rear use stainless steel rust-resistant spokes and contribute to the X-ADV’s capacity to soak up rough terrain.

X-ADV dynamic on road

Stay connected

The full-colour TFT screen offers intuitive control. You can also now link to many smartphone functions, such as turn-by-turn navigation, calls, messages and music, with Honda Roadsync (available with Android™ and iOS™ devices). So, wherever you end up, you’re never out of touch. You can manage riding modes quickly and easily, as well as customise the information displayed to suit your preference.

X-ADV front styling and LED headlights

LED DRL headlights

For piercing and consistent day time visibility. Sharp, dual LED headlights lead the way with bright, Daytime Running Lights (DRL) technology.

X-ADV throttle by wire

Throttle By Wire control and 5 riding modes

Set the engine how you want it. STANDARD riding mode is the mid-point base setting, SPORT turns up the excitement dial, with low HSTC, RAIN softens everything off and GRAVEL gives full power, with low HSTC and ABS. USER mode allows complete customisation.

X-ADV front three quarter static image

Smart Key convenience

All the small details make a big difference. The Smart Key can be stored in your pocket. It operates the keyless ignition system, fuel cap and seat and also opens the (optional) Smart Top Box.

X-ADV DCT close-up

Six-speed Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT)

Transform your riding experience as DCT has replaced hand clutch and foot levers with a clean up/down trigger shifter on the left handlebar. With a choice of Manual and Automatic modes at your fingertips, you’ll never lose that exhilarating connection to your bike – on or off the road.

X-ADV underseat storage

Generous storage capacity

The under-seat luggage space has 21L volume and accepts a full-face adventure-style helmet; you’ll also find a USB Type-C socket for charging your smartphone.

X-ADV side on engine close-up

More powerful, 745cc, 8-valve parallel twin-cylinder engine

69Nm of torque with 43.1kW peak power; the X-ADV can go from highway to trail in a flash, and the engine is tuned to deliver instant response. You also have an extra 600rpm to play with before the redline. And, for A2 licence holders, a 35kW conversion is available from your local Honda dealer.

  • Matte Ballistic Black Metallic Standard
  • Iridium Grey Metallic Standard
  • Grand Prix Red Standard
  • Puco Blue Standard

To make accessorising easy, you can fit your X-ADV with a Pack.

X-ADV with Adventure pack

Adventure Pack

The Adventure Pack ramps up off-road style and durability, ready for any weather and anything. It includes knuckle guard extensions, side pipes, fog lights, leg deflectors and rider steps.

X-ADV with Travel pack

Travel Pack

The Travel Pack offers maximum carrying capacity for the long haul, and includes Smart Top Box, side panniers (including Pannier Bags and Aluminium Panels), centre console bag and heated grips.

X-ADV with style pack

To make an even bigger statement with your X-ADV, the Style Pack is for you. It includes machined handlebar clamps and parking lever (and cover), and enhanced floor panels and side covers.

X-ADV with 50L smart top box

50L Smart top box

You might want to keep it simple. The 50L top box attached to the tailor-made rear carrier, provides ample storage space, and is available with colour matched or aluminium inserts, to key neatly with your X-ADV.

X-ADV side on static with rider

Honda Motorcycles Experience

Make your favourite Honda your own through the Honda Motorcycles Europe app. It’s easy. Choose the bike you want and select a colour. Then, see how it looks sat in your garage through the AR feature. There’s an integrated Accessories Catalogue, so you can add the parts you want. And the Honda Motorcycles Europe YouTube channel is now part of the app, with a gallery of videos to enjoy.

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Book a test ride

Configure your bike, download a brochure, find your local dealer.

road trip x adv

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  • Test des pneus Continental TKC 80 : toujours une référence du pneu 50% offroad ?
  • Test des Racer Mavis 2 : la polyvalence de gants mi-cuir mi-saison

road trip x adv

Test du Honda X-ADV : mon avis après 1 semaine passée avec

Guidon large, pare-mains, jantes à rayons, peinture rouge dans le plus pur style Africa Twin. Il n’est pas rare, de loin, de le confondre avec une moto. Les motards vous saluent même lorsque vous êtes à son guidon (et que vous êtes bien équipé), il s’agit du Honda X-ADV.

Le constructeur japonais a surpris tout le monde lorsqu’il s’est mis à vendre officiellement son concept de scooter trail, et moi le premier. Forcément, lorsque Honda Belgique m’a proposé de me prêter un Honda X-ADV pendant une semaine, je n’ai pas pu résister. Même si c’est un scooter !

Que donne-t-il au quotidien ? En offroad ? Est-il à la hauteur de ses prétentions marketing ? C’est ce que nous allons voir ensemble dans cet essai de quelques jours.

Présentation du X-ADV

Cet hybride repose sur une architecture déjà connue chez Honda puisqu’il utilise comme base le scooter Honda Integra 750. Pour le moteur, on est là aussi sur du connu car exploite le moteur de 745 cm³ de chez Honda déjà présent sur les motos Honda NC750 et NC750X ainsi que sur le Integra 750.

Il s’agit d’un bi-cylindre qui développe 54 ch à 6 250 tr/min avec un couple maxi de 68 Nm à 4 750 tr/min. Autrement dit ça pousse pas mal. De plus il est couplé à une boite automatique DCT (double embrayage) ce qui lui permet de passer les rapports instantanément. C’est très efficace et l’on se retrouve à tenir tête à des motos de cylindrée équivalente sans soucis.

Le 0 à 100 km/h se fait en 5 secondes et la sonorité ressemble fortement à une Africa Twin, c’est vraiment plaisant de faire rugir ce moteur.

Côté châssis et suspensions, il n’a pas à rougir face à certains trails :

  • Jantes à rayons tubeless de 17 pouces à l’avant et 15 pouces à l’arrière qui sont d’ailleurs superbes,
  • Fourche inversée de 41 mm de diamètre, réglable en précharge et détente avec un débattement 153,5 mm,
  • Suspension arrière Pro-Link avec mono amortisseur, réglable en précharge, dotée aussi d’un débattement 150 mm.

Ces différents éléments lui permettent d’obtenir une garde au sol qui culmine à 16 cm, ce qui est très honorable et lui permettra de passer aisément une grande partie des obstacles en chemin et en ville.

Dernier point à préciser qui m’a assez surpris, le poids. Ce X-ADV fait tout de même 238 kg une fois ses 13 litres de réservoir occupés. Cela fait lourd sur le papier mais, en vrai, le poids est situé assez bas et ne se ressent pas.

road trip x adv

Equipement : il ne manque pas grande chose

Le Honda X-ADV est richement équipé et il ne manque pas grand chose pour faire un sans faute :

  • utilisable en mode automatique, séquentiel ou manuel grâce à des commandes de vitesses situées au guidon.
  • Un premier mode D (pour mode Day) : c’est vraiment le mode de tous les jours. Les passages de rapport se font rapidement, c’est doux et confortable à utiliser. C’est très intuitif et en phase avec un usage quotidien.
  • Un second mode S (pour mode Sport) : là c’est une autre histoire. Le scooter est très vif, ça titre très fort, très vite et les passages se font haut dans les tours. Au freinage, la boite n’hésite pas non plus à débrayer très vite pour utiliser au maximum le frein moteur. C’est fun, c’est velu, parfait pour arsouiller sur les petites routes de campagne ou pour éclater un kéké au feu rouge.
  • Un guidon large (identique à celui de l’Africa Twin) sur lequel est monté une paire de pare-mains (empruntés aussi à l’Africa Twin).
  • Une béquille centrale bien pratique pour l’entretien de la chaîne de transmission (graissage, tension). Car contrairement aux autres scooter, le X-ADV est doté d’une transmission par chaîne et non par courroie. Un choix obligatoire de la part de Honda au vue des velléités tout chemin de ce scooter.
  • Une première instrumentation très complète inspirée de la CRF450 Rally qui permet d’avoir accès à toutes les informations : Trip A/B, consommation moyenne, date, heure, température, vitesse, compte-tours ou encore indicateur de rapport engagé. C’est juste dommage que tout se contrôle depuis le tableau de bord et non depuis le guidon. C’est clairement moins pratique à manipuler.
  • Une deuxième instrumentation indiquant si le frein de parking est activé, l’ABS, le neutral ou encore le système anti-démarrage, est disposée au centre du guidon. C’est très gadget car cela n’a aucune utilité directe mais c’est très esthétique.
  • Un éclairage full LED très visible. Les clignotants sont bien marqués, le feu arrière est lui aussi très esthétique avec sa double bande d’éclairage, et les feux LED à l’avant faisant office de feux de croisement et feux de route sont particulièrement efficaces de jour comme de nuit. On voit bien, on est bien repéré sur la route, il n’y aucun reproche à faire à ce sujet.
  • La bulle est réglable manuellement et propose 5 niveaux de réglage. La différence totale de hauteur est de 136 mm entre le point haut et le point bas, avec une variation d’angle de 11°. Elle est efficace et protégera bien votre tête même à vitesse autoroutière. Par contre elle n’est pas très large et vos épaules auront tendance à tout de même subir le vent. De plus, elle est compliquée à manipuler à une main et je ne saurai que trop vous conseiller d’éviter de vouloir la régler en roulant. Ce n’est franchement pas pratique.
  • Scooter oblige, on retrouve un coffre de selle de 21 litres doté d’un allume-cigare. On y rentre aisément un casque intégral mais pas un casque dual sport / adventure muni d’une casquette. C’est dommage surtout pour un scooter pensé pour les adventuriers 🙂
  • Dernier équipement à signaler très agréable pour le quotidien, le système de démarrage sans clé. Ce n’est pas nouveau, on retrouve cela chez Harley Davidson, chez BMW, etc. mais je n’avais jamais expérimenté cette fonction sur une moto auparavant et c’est vraiment plaisant de ne plus devoir sortir sa clé pour démarrer le scooter, ouvrir la trappe à essence ou encore le coffre de selle.

road trip x adv

Vous l’aurez compris, l’équipement est très complet et il ne manque pas grand chose pour faire un sans faute. J’aurai bien aimé un régulateur de vitesse, des commandes au guidon pour l’ordinateur de bord ou encore des vrais repose-pieds pour le offroad fournis de série.

En effet, pour l’équiper confortablement pour les chemins, il faudra passer par la case accessoires et l’équiper de repose-pieds offroad (signés Rizoma) qui sont facturés très cher : plus de 500€. Pour les crash-bar, là aussi, il faudra lâcher un supplément de 200€. Cela vient s’additionner au prix de base de 11 499€ demandé par Honda, ça commence à faire cher et j’aurai bien aimé retrouver ces 2 accessoires indispensables de série sur le X-ADV.

L’Usine Motos de Honda a d’ailleurs mis en place un site internet totalement dédié à ce scooter dual sport, en y proposant tous les accessoires en ligne afin que vous puissiez vous renseigner et l’équiper convenablement. Rendez-vous sur le site internet https://www.xadvshop.com/fr/

Comportement sur route

En mode urbain, le X-ADV ne passe pas inaperçu. Entre sa carrure imposante, son coloris rouge rally et ses grosses roues à rayons, il fait tourner les têtes. Clairement on ne le croise pas à tous les coins de rue et il intrigue.

A part le côté inaperçu qu’il faudra oublier, ce maxi scooter est très agréable à manier en ville. Le poids n’est pas handicapant, il braque bien et la roue de 17 pouces à l’avant ne pose aucun soucis. On appréciera la discrétion du passage de rapport de la boite DCT et le répondant du moteur très pratique pour s’extirper du trafic dans les premiers lorsque le feu passe au vert.

road trip x adv

Sur départementale

Lorsque l’on quitte la ville, j’ai trouvé le X-ADV encore plus à l’aise et agréable. Il est vif, joueur et donne franchement envie de prendre de l’angle jusqu’à en faire frotter le plastique ! Je me suis beaucoup amusé avec le mode S dans les virages et les petites routes. La sonorité velue du bicylindre donne envie de tirer toujours plus sur la poignée et on retrouve un peu le comportement moteur d’une moto au final. Bref, on s’habitue très vite et il met en confiance très rapidement.

Les pneus Bridgestone Trail Wing collent bien à la route et ne m’ont pas posé de soucis lors de mes roulages sur le sec ou sous la pluie . C’est un bon pneu mixte.

Enfin la suspension est efficace et absorbera sans problème les déformations de la route. Elle vous permettra de passer à bonne vitesse et confortablement sur les routes de campagne.

En fait, c’est un peu le scooter idéal pour les personnes vivants hors de la ville puisqu’il cumule les avantages du scooter et le confort du trail. C’est un hybride sympa et pertinent vue le nombre croissant de personnes qui habitent en campagne et travaillent en ville.

road trip x adv

Comportement en offroad

J’ai profité d’une sortie avec des amis pour mettre à l’épreuve des chemins cet X-ADV. Me voilà donc parti en sortie offroad de 40 km avec 3 autres trails. Et là, je ne ferai pas plus de suspens, j’ai été tout bonnement épaté par cet engin !

Je me suis retrouvé à rouler à 70-80 km/h dans les chemins avec un scooter, en position debout. Oui tout va bien c’est parfaitement normal, c’est un X-ADV !

L’ABS non déconnectable vous empêchera de faire des dérapages au freinage mais vous pourrez tout de même vous amuser à faire des drift ou des démarrages bien glissés grâce à l’absence de traction control.  Le couple bien présent à bas régime vous permettra de vous adonner à des sorties de virages en travers comme avec un trail 🙂

La suspension est très efficace pour les petits trous et obstacles mais il faudra penser à la durcir via les réglages pour éviter de trop régulièrement taper en butée.

La garde au sol de 16 cm permet de passer facilement sur les routes de tracteur et autres chemins peu accidentés. Cela se complique par contre lorsque les ornières deviennent trop profondes. On a vite envie d’attaquer de plus en plus fort et de franchir de plus en plus complexe mais la garde au sol vous rappellera à l’ordre. Cela m’a occasionné un petite chute à basse vitesse, heureusement sans gravité.

J’ai donc pu tester le fait de relever le X-ADV suite à une chute et là encore, le poids situé bas permet de ne pas avoir l’impression de relever un scooter de presque 240 kg.

A mi-parcours, je me rends compte que le sabot moteur alu n’est en fait pas un vrai sabot moteur… Il s’arrête juste en dessous et ne protège ni le carter moteur ni l’échappement. Attention donc à ne pas tout casser en franchissement.

Dernier point à signaler, la position debout. Je n’avais malheureusement pas les repose-pieds offroad montés sur mon modèle de test et j’ai donc dû me mettre debout en bidouillant avec la zone plastique prévue pour poser ses pieds. Et sincèrement, c’était usant. Je n’arrivais pas à rester debout plus de 15 min tellement il fallait gainer les abdos et bloquer les bras pour rester debout efficacement. Je ne pouvais pas vraiment utiliser mes jambes et mon corps pour faire suspension. Après 30 min de balade, j’ai commencé à trouver une position à peu près correcte mais ce n’était pas l’idéal. L’expérience doit être tout autre avec ces fameux repose-pieds offroad.

road trip x adv

C’est un donc une bonne surprise et j’ai passé un moment extrêmement fun avec cet X-ADV en offroad. Il m’a surpris, il a surpris mes amis en trail (et aussi des enduristes en pause qui m’ont regardé passer dans les chemins comme si j’étais un extra-terrestre). On peut tenir un sacré rythme et suivre des trails si l’on a un minimum de maîtrise et d’expérience en offroad.

Par contre, en l’état, sans préparation plus poussée, il faudra donc limiter le X-ADV à des chemins. Je suis sûr qu’il peut faire plus mais il faudra le modifier et le protéger un peu plus.

Pour mieux vous rendre compte de ses qualités en chemin, je vous conseille de regarder la vidéo de Stéphane qui me filmait lors de cette sortie :

Autonomie, consommation et révisions

Après 1000 km, j’ai pu dresser un bilan de la consommation en SP95-E10 de ce Honda X-ADV. J’ai fait la distinction entre 2 consommations différentes selon l’usage :

  • Mode D en ville, sur départementale et en offroad : 3,8 l/100km
  • Mode S ou Mode D sur autoroute : entre 4,5 l/100km et 5 l/100km

C’est donc très sobre et l’on peut atteindre assez facilement 350 km avec 13 litres de carburant en roulage de tous les jours ou 300 km si il est utilisé sur autoroute ou de manière sportive.

Enfin, pour ce qui est des révisions, il faut savoir que l’entretien se fait tous les 12 000 km et que le jeu aux soupapes se contrôle tous les 24 000 km. Le coût des révisions devrait donc être assez élevé tous les 24 000 km. Je n’ai pas pu obtenir les tarifs (qui sont sûrement variables d’un concessionnaire à l’autre).

Les éléments de révision peuvent être consultés sur le site de Honda en cliquant ICI et en mettant « X-ADV » dans le champ modèle .

Test du X-ADV en vidéo

Bonjour, Merci pour cet essais super complet et impartial. J’attends mon X ADV rouge que je devrais avoir depuis 15 jours. Honda a, semble t’il en ce moment des petits soucis de logistiques. Petite question, je mesure 1,72m. La hauteur de selle va t’elle me poser problème . J’ai commandé mon X ADV sur un coup de coeur.. J’espère que … LOL. En tous cas.. Merci pour cet essais qui me conforte dans mon achat .. J-Pierre

Bonjour Jean-Pierre, Non je ne pense que cela posera de soucis, il faudra juste s’habituer à gérer le X ADV sur la pointe des pieds ce qui est tout à fait gérable 🙂 A+!

bien sur c’est gerable mais pas confort du tout

Très bonne présentation et démonstration sur l’usage du Honda xadv. La hauteur de selle m’inquiète un petit peu. Pouvez vous me donner votre taille ? Cordialement

Merci Yves, je fais 1m82 et tout se passait bien lors de l’essai 🙂 A+ !

Bonjour Je viens de découvrir vos essais , et bien bravo sur vos commentaires trés différents et plus en phase avec les motards « normaux » qui cherchent des machines sympas pour rouler au quotidien et faire de belles escapades ( loisirs , vacances) et ne sont pas des « Rossi » de la route. Bonne continuation

Merci André 🙂

essai super sympa je vais demander un essai j’ai eu 99 % de mes réponses dans ce test merci encore.je vais certainement changer mon 1200 bandit bientot.

Merci pour ce retour positif 🙂

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Honda X-ADV review

Bikes such as the Suzuki Burgman are in many ways perfect for travelling on. They have excellent luggage capacity, good weather protection and are practical and versatile in a way that even proper ‘adventure’ bikes are not. The solution of course is an adventure scooter. It’s a wonder no one thought of it sooner….

A PROPER MOTORCYCLE

The X-ADV is actually a proper motorcycle. The fact that it is chain driven (rather than belt) and has the engine up at the front means that it doesn’t qualify as a scooter, and fundamentally is nothing more than a NC750, reimagined to look like a scooter, with the X-ADV itself based on the Integra that Honda started out their hybrid moto-scooter experiments with.

So the engine is the same 745cc parallel twin as in the NC750 range, given an extra 500rpm rev range in order to give it a sportier ride, and fitted with the latest fourth generation dual clutch transmission gearbox (DCT). Much else is new on the bike. There’s a new cast aluminium swingarm, tubeless spoked rims (17-inch front, 15-inch rear) fitted with Bridgestone Trail Wing tyres, as well as a new headlight and fairing design that go some way to justifying the fact that this DCT equipped X-ADV is nigh on £2500 more than an equally engined NC750. £9599 is the damage.

It’s a serious amount of money and reinforces the notion that Honda doesn’t see the X-ADV as a volume seller in the way that the NC750 is, but instead a niche, low volume machine that was born out of the curious minds of Honda engineers who thought that building an Integra that could ride the rough trails down to the local beach was a good idea.

The first thing about the X-ADV is how difficult it is to get on. I’m 5’10 but really struggled to get my leg up and over, mainly because of what is quite a tall wide seat, rising from the 790mm of the Integra to a new height of 820mm, with ground clearance also increasing from 135mm to a more lofty 162mm. You can’t step-through it either as the engine and black and easily scuffed cowling are in the way. You have to approach it like a normal bike and even then I couldn’t find a way to get on it cleanly, especially with the top box fitted. It’s a bit of a shame as you’d think that the main market for this kind of bike is the older rider struggling to get on a big bike and seeing something like the X-ADV as an alternative.

Otherwise the X-ADV doesn’t feel as heavy as its wet weight figure of 238 kilos would suggest. It feels light and manoeuvrable in a way that an equally weighted Africa Twin or GS might not. There are some nice touches to it as well. The screen adjustment mechanism works well and is simply enough to use, though does at times require two hands. The keyless ignition – whilst not for me as I prefer the simplicity of a key – is a nice nod towards modern functionality, with an ignition dial in the centre of the console turning the bike to on, or off, or to the position which allows you to toggle open either the fuel flap or underseat storage latch by means of a rather flimsy plastic rocker switch. Under the seat the 21-litre storage area has just enough room for a non-peaked helmet, as well as a 12v socket and an interior light in order to illuminate your luggage. It’s not as practical as a big scooter, but it is more practical than a typical motorcycle. A glovebox up in the front cowling would have been handy.

The X-ADV is a DCT six-speed gearbox only, with no manual option available. This is now fourth generation DCT and it does feel smoother than the bikes I’ve ridden in the past with DCT. On the right switchgear you control the bike from Neutral, to Drive to Sport. Sport holds the gears longer and downshifts earlier. In either of these modes the bike is working as a full automatic and does a good job of it, with often imperceptible changes (though does sometimes leave you in the wrong gear when cornering). On the right switchgear there’s also a toggle to flick the bike into manual mode. This brings into play the forefinger and thumb operated buttons on the left switchgear; the forefinger to go up a gear (where the headlight flash would usually be), the thumb to go down a gear.

Once selected, the bike remains under manual operation, over-ridden only when you decelerate and don’t change down, at which point the system will automatically drop the gears with the engine revs. You can also bring the manual gear change buttons into play at any time, over-riding both Drive or Sport mode, the auto system kicking back in after approximately 10 seconds. This was how I preferred to ride the bike; Drive mode, full auto, and if needed the manual toggles to override the bike’s brain to change up or down, and then allow auto to kick back in again.

It’s a good system. It suits the X-ADV in a way that for me DCT doesn’t suit the Africa Twin. On a big tall adventure bike I prefer a good old fashioned clutch and gear lever, but on the X-ADV it works well as a twist-and-go. The only niggle is Sport mode. All this does is hold onto gears longer than in Drive and the nature of the low-revving parallel-twin engine means that it makes more noise but not necessarily more speed as most of the surge has gone by 4250rpm. Leave it in Drive would be my suggestion.

PERFORMANCE

In terms of performance the 54 bhp X-ADV feels oddly more sluggish than a NC750 (which only weighs 8 less at 230 kilos). Maybe it’s the riding position that doesn’t give the same sense of speed, or maybe that the engine in this test bike was low mileage and still needed bedding in. You would describe the X-ADV as brisk but not much more. Having said that it’ll sit all day at high motorway speeds, top out at about 110mph and achieve economy figures of around 70mpg, even when ridden reasonably hard. Fuel capacity isn’t exceptional at 14.1-lites, but with such good economy it should be able to manage over 200 miles to a tank if ridden frugally. Plenty of range for most trips.

As well as the new swingarm, the X-ADV also gets new 41mm upside down front forks with adjustment for rebound and preload, whilst front brakes are radially-mounted Nissin calipers taken from the Africa Twin, fitted with twin 310mm discs. The rear shock is now adjustable for preload. It’s a big step up from the equipment on the NC750 and and Integra and goes part way to justifying the extra £2150 the X-ADV costs over the DCT equipped NC750X and the £1270 over and above the price of an Integra.

The bike certainly handles well – better than you were imagining – with quick turn in and a supple but controlled ride. I definitely noticed the improved quality of the suspension over the NC750, which can get out of shape quite quickly, especially along bumpy roads. Nice wide bars appear to be taken from the Africa Twin and give good leverage for tipping into tight turns. It is a strange sensation initially having your feet up in the air out in front of you, but you do get used to it. The X-ADV’s longer wheelbase over the NC750X (1590mm plays 1525mm) also makes it a surprisingly stable bike at speed and overall the handling is a lot of fun.

I also liked that the rear brake was handlebar mounted in the position you would usually find the clutch. This worked well with the DCT gearbox, allowing you to trail brake the rear when doing tight manoeuvres on partial throttle, almost using the back brake as a clutch. It’s a feature that would work well on the DCT equipped Africa Twin, which can be a bit tricky to manoeuvre at slow speeds, trying to feather the throttle or use your right boot to drag the rear brake. The set up on the X-ADV is preferable, with a discreet pull on parking brake tucked away inside the right fairing cowl.

The uprated brakes of the X-ADV also work well, with good stopping power and effective – and possibly a touch oversensitive – ABS, especially on gravel surfaces. It is a shame you can’t disengage ABS, particularly at the rear, as that would make for a lot of fun in the dirt, especially with the bike’s inherent stability at low speeds and that hand operated rear brake lever. Traction control isn’t an option on the X-ADV, so at least you can spin up the rear for a dramatic gravel road take off, whilst on road the moderate performance is unlikely to catch you out on a wet corner.

Having taken the bike on a 300 mile round trip to the Peak District I did find the seat uncomfortable after an hour or so in the saddle, though I imagine a bit of that is getting accustomed to the riding position, which places more pressure on the backside and less on the feet than the adventure style of bike I usually ride. I didn’t get to test the rear seat for pillion space, but it is nice sizeable pad and probably makes the X-ADV better suited for two up riding than the NC750. As long as the pair of you can get on.

During my time with the bike I explored a few familiar dirt trails. The biggest limitation for off-road riding is the fact that it’s a bike not designed for standing up on. Your feet on the narrow running boards are too far forward and anyone of any normal height won’t be able to stand up straight enough to get any real control, or weight over the front of the bike. It leaves you in a crouching position that feels unnatural and precarious. Honda do make aftermarket off-road footpegs that bolt in the position where the footrests would be on the NC750. A Honda rep said these made the bike much ‘better’ in the dirt, which I could well imagine, although I’m sceptical to believe they’d transform it into something that was truly designed for more spirited off-road riding.

Having said that, I watched bike journalist Chris Moss push the bike around on gravel with a lot of confidence, not to mention speed, so if the surface isn’t too taxing and the rider brave enough, you could definitely have some fun on the X-ADV. Just don’t drop it. During my time with the bike it rolled off the stand at standstill. It broke the hand guard, brake lever, scuffed the running board and dented the heat shield on the end can. You can get optional crash guards for the running boards, which are probably going to be a good idea.

SO WHAT IS IT?

Honda labels the X-ADV as a city adventure bike and I think that’s about right. It’s at its best in short, tight environments, and even if you never take the bike off-road the longer travel suspension still makes it ride the bumps and potholes of modern roads than much better than a regular scooter, or NC750X for example. Is it worth the extra money over the NC750X? Probably not, not in practical terms, but the X-ADV does have a prestige and a presence about it, not to mention the superior quality brakes and suspension. I did at times feel a bit silly on the X-ADV. I was conscious of its showy graphics and its blurred relationship between bike and scooter. Some other bikers didn’t know what to make of it. I think you need to be a confident character to ride a X-ADV, because people do look, and will pay it some interest, positive or otherwise.

The question is whether it’s really answered the question of a scooter being used as an adventure bike. I look at the figures for the Suzuki Burgman 650 or Yamaha T-MAX 530, and wonder if the X-ADV has really added anything over those two bikes. The Burgman in particular has over twice as much underseat storage space than the X-ADV, and then there’s maintenance free belt drive that would be a blessing on the long hauls. Even the Integra – the X-ADV’s foundation block – is arguably more practical for a big trip, for the fact that side panniers can be fitted to it, whereas the X-ADV only takes a top box. I’d probably prefer the Integra’s key ignition over the X-ADV’s key-less as well, but then the Integra wouldn’t ride as well over the bumps and wouldn’t have the ground clearance, so it’s all a much of a muchness, and down to what you need from a bike.

I do think there’s room for an adventure scooter and in a way Honda already makes it in the form of their 50cc Ruckus or Zoomer scooters that are proper bare bones and sturdy go anywhere vehicles, just lacking a bit of refinement and an engine that would allow the bikes to cover a bit more distance and at greater speed. Stick the old XR400 engine in one and that’d probably work a treat (and also potentially get more people interested).

Attempting to weigh up the X-ADV pragmatically and objectively is never going to work. It’s not a bike that adds up on paper. To some people it’ll never add up at all. For them it’s always going to be too expensive, too gaudy, too lacking in purpose to make it a proper adventure bike in the way historically we’ve imagined an adventure bike (knobbly tyres, big front wheel, cheap to buy, simple to fix). But if you accept if for what it was designed as – a bike to use all week on the city commute and to then head off on the weekend with a bike capable of taking you along the path down to the beach – then it makes  more sense. It’s probably never going to be someone’s only bike. I imagine most will be bought as a second bike – something to complement a GS or Africa Twin because ultimately those bikes are more versatile than the X-ADV is ever going to be.

It’s a shame it’s not easier to get on and off. It’s a shame those off-road pegs don’t come as standard and it’s a shame it’s not as practical as a proper large capacity scooter, but you still have to give credit to a company for putting their head on the block and building a bike they must have known was never going to make them much money, or even sell in any volume. It takes a bit of guts to build a bike like that. You could say it takes a bit of an adventurous spirit. Ultimately, the X-ADV is not the bike for me. It’s not a bike I would buy with my own money. But that doesn’t mean it’s not a bike for someone out there, and in all honesty, the more you ride it, the more it does start to make at least some sense.

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HONDA ADV350 (2022 - on) Review

2022 Honda ADV350

  • New 330cc scooter from Honda
  • Goes and handles like a motorcycle
  • Generously equipped

At a glance

Overall rating.

Honda struck gold when they released the X-ADV in 2017. Half scooter, half adventure bike, it may not have captured the imagination of riders in the UK, but for the rest of the world, especially Europe, where scooter culture a much bigger part of everyday life, they’ve flown out of showrooms.

  • Related: 2021 Honda X-ADV bike review

Not only did they sell nearly 44,000 of them up to the end of 2021, but it was also Honda’s best-selling bike of that year, too. So, it makes sense that they’d produce a smaller, more affordable version: the ADV350.  

The new twist-and-go makes perfect sense for commuters who want a bit more poke and flexibility than a 125. Not only will the ADV350 ping to motorway speeds as quick as you’d naturally accelerate on a motorcycle and do over 95mph, it has genuine big-bike handling, braking power and road presence.

Riding in town with the 2022 Honda ADV350

Whether or not an adventure-styled mid-sized scooter that can handle a spot of light off-road floats your boat, one thing’s for sure: the ADV350 is an impressive machine in its own right.

It feels every inch a well sorted – albeit sometimes firm, motorcycle with strong performance and solid, reassuring handling, but it also enjoys all the benefits of being an easy to live with twist-and-go-too.

It’s smooth, simple to ride, comfortable and with superb fuel economy and lots of storage, it’s practical, too. Best of all it’s cheaper than its premium brand rivals, despite its superb build quality and generous equipment level.  

Ride quality & brakes

What really separates the ADV350 from your average scooter is the way it’s screwed together and how it holds the road. This is no flimsy, built down to a price runabout.

It’s solid, well finished (it comes in red, silver and black) and doesn’t crash, bang and fold itself in half when you show it a small bump. Granted the ride can be firm over rough roads – the payoff for being able to handle the dirt, but thanks to its lightweight tubular steel frame and proper forks, the Honda is stable, confident in corners and its Metzelers have lots of wet and dry grip.

Riding the Honda ADV350

Honda’s Rome-based R&D department have been unapologetically bold with the adventure styling, too. It’s a physically large and substantial machine, but at the same time light, agile and manageable to ride.

Its demeanour also serves to keep you safe - it looks so much like motorcycle at a glance, you don’t get bullied by traffic, like you do on a conventional scooter. It’s comfortable, too, but with such tall bodywork in front of the seat it’s not as easy to swing your leg over as a regular 'step through'.

Honda ADV350 gets Showa twin shocks

The action of the manually adjustable screen is simple, too. In its high position (it has a 133mm range) it’s great for keeping rain off around town and in the lower, more raked positions there’s minimal buffeting for motorway riding. It’s actually quieter the lion’s share of 'proper' adventure bikes.

Powered by the same 29bhp, 330cc single cylinder engine you’ll find in Honda’s maxi scooter-style Forza 350 and pizza delivery-shaped SH350i, the ADV350 is smooth, quiet and friendly.

Spritely performance has more in common with a big cube maxi-scooter than an oversized 125 and it’s smoother at low speed than its bigger 750cc parallel twin cylinder sister, simply because it has a proper ‘elastic band’ scooter CVT gearbox, rather than the X-ADV’s jerky DCT.

Honda claims 83mpg, which adds up to a 213 range from its 11.7-litre fuel tank.

Riding a 2022 Honda ADV350 in town

Reliability & build quality

Although it’s a new model, you can use Honda’s X-ADV and 300/350cc scooter range as a gauge to any reliability issues… and there aren’t any. Fit and finish are excellent, too.

2022 Honda ADV350 exhaust

Value vs rivals

It isn’t cheap, but when you look at the level of spec and performance you get for the money, the asking price becomes more agreeable.

Riding a 2022 Honda ADV350

The ADV350 doesn’t have any direct rivals, but it’s cheaper than the £6799 Suzuki Burgman 400 , Yamaha’s £5850 XMAX 300 and even the £5999 Kymco XCITING S 400.

You can find cheaper mid-size scoots from the less premium manufacturers, but they won’t have the Honda’s build quality, level of equipment or resale value.

Standard goodies include 37mm Showa upside down forks and twin piggyback shocks with dual rate springs, a Nissin front brake caliper, a four-way adjustable screen, hand guards, wide adventure style handlebars, LED lights, keyless ignition, two USB chargers, ABS and two-stage (including 'off') torque control.

It has small scooter-sized (15in front, 14in rear) aluminium cross-spoke wheels, but they’re shod with top notch Metzeler Karoo Street dual purpose rubber…just in case you need to ride across a field on your way to work.

2022 Honda ADV350 gets an LCD dash

48 litres of underseat storage (with a removable separator plate) is enough for a full-size helmet and a smaller scooter-style lid. It also has a 2.5 litre glove box.

Multi-function LCD dash, controlled by left switchgear has smart phone voice control for calls, navigation, music and texts via Honda’s RoadSync app.

Accessories include a 50-litre top box that works with the keyless system, a rear rack, heated grips, a U lock and bike cover.

Model history & versions

Model history.

  • 2022: Honda ADV350 introduced

Other versions

There are no other versions of the Honda ADV350.

Owners' reviews for the HONDA ADV350 (2022 - on)

7 owners have reviewed their HONDA ADV350 (2022 - on) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your HONDA ADV350 (2022 - on)

Rides more like a bike than a scooter, thanks to great suspension. Plenty of power for all types of ride. Handles all road surfaces well. Tons of underseat storage. I have both large bikes and small scooters and this is a perfect in-between - I find myself using this most of the time.

Rides more like a bike than a scooter, thanks to great suspension. Plenty of power for all types of ride. Handles all road surfaces well and good brakes.

Great for a 350cc

Great Honda quality.

About 70 mpg, so not necessarily better than a bigger cc bike

ABS and display/features are more than adequate for this type of vehicle.

Buying experience: Brand new - Honds dealer

Annual servicing cost: £150

Very happy with my first Scooter ( I prefer to call it a step-through) Have just returned from a few days riding around the South West of England. With a friend riding a NC750...Not a super fast bike , but a 750 nevertheless...Both experienced riders used to larger Adventure and touring bikes...On the longest riding day (close to 200 miles) we tried to stay off the main roads....The ADv was handling the tighter B type roads better than the 750....Picking up quicker and effortlessly taking the corners...Really good fun. may not move up to the ADV750 after all...

Handles surprisingly well, almost like a a "proper" bike....Brakes are OK, but can be a bit weak when trying hard

Really lively and smooth....When you find the sweet spot it pulls better than expected

Only done 2000 miles , but no problems at all..

Close to 80 mpg since day one

Annual servicing cost: £100

Great practical bike that is comfortable and relaxing to ride.

Comfortable seat and multiple foot positions and good upright riding position. Suspension feels a bit firm and not great on really uneven roads, but confident handling.

Less than 30hp, but easy to keep up with traffic and overtakes can be made with little trouble. From standstill, it gets away well.

It's a Honda so appears usual good build quality.

Display showing 19.4 miles per litre keeping up with traffic, mixed riding.

Enough for me, screen gives enough information, power socket in left side cubby. Under seat storage is good.

Buying experience: Bought from Dobles, I could see on forum that people were waiting a long time for bikes, I called Dobles and they had a cancelled order and was able to get on one quickly. Good experience.

Version: Spangle Silver

Annual servicing cost: £130

The ADV350 is such an interesting bike. Comfortable in the extreme and yet genuinely fun to ride. It's such a nice place to sit whilst you soak up the energy of a busy city or the peace of the countryside. It feels like a tricked up, sporty VW van on two wheels, if that makes any sense. If you're ever going to try a scooter, this is the one with the dynamics of a 'bike but the comfort and practicality of a CVT scoot.

The brakes are great. Having levers on the handlebar for both front and back brake, works really well, once you adjust to it. There's plenty of power. Initially I found the ride harsh but discovered the rear tyre had been overinflated. At the correct tyre pressures the ride remains firm over ripples in the road but smooth and compliant over speed humps and potholes. Leant over the bike is fantastic at holding a line, the quality suspension allowing the bike to track true. You can ride for several hours before even thinking about a rest. The tank gives you over 6 hours of riding time and you could do that without stopping due to the multiple seating position the bike's layout offers. The adjustable screen works really well (I'm 5'9") and isn't noisy. Having the option to put it right down is great on very hot days. The bike feels both nimble due to the smaller wheels but equally, very stable. You can't 'flick-flack' quite as easy as a naked road bike but you can really hustle it along or sit back and cruise. It seems to have multiple personalities unlike some one trick ponies.

Over 80mpg but still able to beat nearly everything off the line, is impressive. I have to stop myself riding like a hooligan in town, as the engine makes it possible to dominate urban traffic. It cruises at 75 mph no problem and will accelerate strongly up a hill to an indicated 90+ . It will overtake much better than the CB500 range with the CVT transmission feeling like it gives the engine torque everywhere with no time wasted thinking about gear selection.

Excellent build quality throughout with no rattles or flimsy parts. The view from the seat is impressive with wide tapered handlebars and well finishes switchgear. The LCD screen is clear and the bike feels premium.

The £5,800 asking price might seem steep but this is a genuine all round vehicle that can do a wide range of tasks really well. Compared to other scooters of similar performance, the ADV350 is a bargain. And when compared to CB500s, for example, they seem overpriced. The 8,000 mile service intervals are generous and I feel like I've got a lot for my money.

LED lights, brilliant adjustable wind screen, sturdy handguards, traction control that you can turn off, 50 litres of storage without an ugly top box, intuitive LCD clock with range, average consumption, clock, revs, the ability to scroll through the functions with a toggle on the left grip. The ability to Bluetooth to your phone for texts etc. A USB charger. It's got plenty.

Buying experience: I had to wait for several months back at the start of 2022 but I was lucky, many people waited much longer and even gave up, I think, which is a shame as they have missed out on a great bike.

I wasn't really sure what to expect when buying the ADV350 but it caught my imagination and I thought I'd give it a try. I think this machine has converted me to scooters for good: if you're not sure about scooters, but curious, at least try one.

Rides differently and perhaps more harshly than a 'bike', as you might expect on small, fat wheels with a rear mounted engine but only really noticeable over broken surfaces - seems to be exacerbated when riding 'feet forward' for some reason, probably because 'feet down' braces the body better. But much better than expected - very comfortable over long distances. Brakes very effective, traction control intervenes more than normal, especially over poor surfaces - small wheels again I guess.

A little lethargic at low speed and the CVT transmission is a little noisy - typical scooter perhaps but it's transformed when you open the throttle - quick to pick up, silky smooth, no DCT jerkiness, no vibrations of any sort and it just keeps going with no drama or apparent stress. This replaces a long line of Hondas from XR250/CRFs to ST1100s and, most recently, an AT 1000 DCT, and it's by far the most well rounded machine of the lot. It's hard to believe it's only 330cc: punches well above its weight.

Early days but appears to have inherited usual Honda high build quality - nicely finished, though one or two of the panels appear a little less than robust. Also inherits usual Honda foibles (e.g. poor legibility of dash screen) but otherwise it appears Honda is all present and correct.

Compared to a NC750X, it looks expensive to buy but compared to a X-ADV, it looks like a bargain. Still running in but achieving 75+mpg.

Keyless ignition is neat but rather overly fussy and the key can take time to pair. Can't start it on the side stand. Screen is hard to read but it has everything you need, including a trip computer. CVT (no chain to maintain), centre stand, tubeless, very effective and easy to adjust screen, huge under-seat storage and glovebox, great weather protection. No fussy modes - just twist and go. Makes traditional bikes seem rather primitive but it's obviously a different type of machine that will either appeal or won't.

3000 miles in France and Spain with no problems Very happy with this machine

2022 Honda ADV350

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Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

BMW Motorrad Canada announces ADV-X, a week-long adventure motorcycle tour set in British Columbia! 1880km of the most breathtaking scenery Canada has to offer. Welcome to week #258 of our Inspiration Friday : BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour at Total Motorcycle . Get inspired to with a variety of thrilling and challenging terrains, cross BC’s rocky mountain range, see quaint small towns along the way. With 5 days and 5 nights including all meals, medical, luggage and Multiple support vehicles, it’s not only a trip of a life time but…well, a trip of a lifetime!

The first ever ADV-X will go this weekend from September 10-15, 2023…but fear not, you can learn about this years event and if you are inspired enough, sign up for BMW ADV-X 2024 !

Check out all the new 2024 BMW motorcycles here in on TMW in our 2024 Motorcycle Model Guides and get ready for your next adventure.

Total Motorcycle would like to thank BMW, British Columbia Canada and our over 400 million of motorcycle riders and enthusiasts who visit and support TMW for inspiring us to bring you this week’s Inspiration Friday : BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour !

Each week we bring you another Inspiring Motorcycle story to inspire you to get out and ride.

Join Total Motorcycle here and help us by joining Total Motorcycle’s  new YouTube Membership  and  $2/mo Patreon  channels.

Please help us help riders, support motorcyclists and motorcycling worldwide today.

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

+++ First-ever adventure riding program hosted by BMW Motorrad Canada. +++ Five days of adventure riding in British Columbia, Canada. +++ Over 1880 km to be travelled. +++ September 10-15, 2023. +++

Today BMW Motorrad Canada announced the launch of its first-ever adventure motorcycle tour in Canada, BMW Motorrad ADV-X. Set to take place from September 10 to 15, 2023, the tour will cover over 1880 km of mixed terrain in British Columbia’s rocky mountain range, ideal for BMW Motorrad’s world-renowned and award-winning range of GS models.

Specially curated routes will traverse a variety of thrilling and challenging terrain while encountering some of the most breathtaking scenery Canada has to offer. The ride will begin in Vancouver and head towards Sun Peaks Resort, near Kamloops, BC. From there, riders will complete various off-road loops over three full days of riding, all with the presence and support of BMW Motorrad Offroad Certified Instructors from across Canada. The program will conclude at High Road Motorsports in Langley, BC.

Participants will receive all the benefits of a formally organized tour throughout. This includes official BMW technical support, luggage service with support vehicles, emergency tire service, as well as medical support. The program includes all meals as well as five nights’ accommodation, with four of those nights at the luxurious Sun Peaks Grand Hotel.

The BMW Motorrad ADV-X program is administered and hosted in partnership with Enduro Park Canada. For more information please visit www.advx.ca

ENDURO PARK CANADA A PROUD PARTNER The BMW Motorrad ADV-X is proud to partner with Enduro Park Canada to bring the experience of a lifetime to you. Enduro Park Canada is hosting and managing all details for the event. If you have any questions at anytime, please reachout to the Enduro Park Canada team and they can support you.

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

LET THE ADVENTURE BEGIN JOIN US FOR THE FIRST-EVER BMW MOTORRAD ADV-X.

From September 10th to 15th, you’re invited to join the most passionate GS riders from across the land for the first-ever BMW Motorrad ADV-X. Over the course of one action-packed week, you’ll journey deep into British Columbia’s rocky mountain range, traversing a variety of thrilling and challenging terrain while encountering some of the most breathtaking scenery this country has to offer.

Following each day’s ride, you’ll be treated to some R&R at BC’s iconic Sun Peaks Resort, where you’ll have the freedom to explore the countless shops, cafés and restaurants nestled within Sun Peak’s European-style pedestrian village.

Don’t miss your chance to experience the adventure ride of a lifetime. Choose from one of the two event packages below to reserve your spot today.

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

WHAT YOU’LL NEED TO JOIN THE ADVENTURE

The BMW Motorrad ADV-X is open to GS riders of all skill levels. However, there are a few mandatory items that you’ll need to be part of the adventure.

A BMW GS motorcycle Valid Motorcycle License and Insurance Off-road riding safety gear Off-road style boots are highly recommended (e.g., GS Comp Boots, Venture Grip GTX or similar) Off-road tires (Can be ordered and fitted at the event) GPS capability is optional Maximum 1 x 55L Soft Luggage Bag (This must be a weather-proof soft bag no larger than 55L) The drive to have plenty of fun riding your GS!

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

BMW MOTORRAD ADV-X PACKAGES ALL PACKAGES INCLUDE:

– 5 days of adventure riding, over 1880 km – 5 nights accommodation (single or double room available) – Route marked each day by lead riders – Route sheet and GPS file as additional navigation – Official BMW tech support – Medical support – Luggage support – Emergency tire service – Multiple support vehicles – 4 dinners – 5 lunches – 5 breakfasts – Feature length event video – Event photographer – Event pack including T-shirt, luggage tags, stickers & more

Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

YOUR TRIP, AT A GLANCE

Sunday, September 10th

ARRIVAL DAY

Arrive at Clarion Hotel & Conference Centre in Abbotsford, BC. Join us for an evening meet & greet to get to know your fellow riders over food and drinks.

Monday, September 11th

TRANSFER TO SUN PEAKS RESORT

Depart from the Clarion Hotel & Conference Centre to Sun Peaks Resort, where all riders will stay for the remainder of the trip.

Tuesday, September 12th – Thursday September 14th

OFF-ROAD ADVENTURE RIDES Enjoy a new route every day amidst the beauty of BC’s backcountry. Daily routes will be revealed and shared the evening before.

Thursday, September 14th

ADV-X TEAM FAREWELL & AWARDS DINNER Enjoy one final send-off and team dinner before making your way back home.

Friday, September 15th

RIDE TO LANGLEY The entire BMW Motorrad ADV-X crew will ride together back to High Road Langley. Those riding home can depart directly from Sun Peaks Resort.

2024 BMW R1250GS Adventure

  • Adventure Tour
  • BMW Motorrad
  • British Columbia
  • Challenging
  • Inspiration
  • Inspiration Friday
  • Rocky Mountain

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Munich. BMW Group sales continued their positive trend last month with a total of 220,649 vehicles delivered to customers, an increase of 5.2% and a new all-time high for the month of November. With its […]

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COMMENTS

  1. Honda X-ADV Road Trip

    After a longer wait, I took advantage of the nice weather to take my first road trip with my Honda X-ADV. I test how the X-ADV behaves on longer rides and us...

  2. Direction les Bardenas en Honda X-ADV (4K-60fps)

    *Version 4K & 60FPS*Road Trip de 10 jours à travers la France, depuis Paris jusqu'au désert des Bardenas Réales (Espagne), en passant par les Alpes, le Vento...

  3. HONDA X-ADV ROAD TRIP

    Honda X-ADV #honda X-ADV#hondaxadvVideo: instagram @blacksheep_photographyAsistent: instagram @alexandar_bozic HONDA X-ADV Road trip

  4. Honda X-ADV (2021) on and off-road video and editorial review

    Honda Honda X-ADV (2021) on and off-road video and editorial review. Visordown has spent the last couple of weeks hooning around on the new Honda X-ADV. Here's what we have learnt about the updated 2021 model. THE Honda X-ADV was launched in 2016, and it's fair to say at the time, there were just as many confused faces as there were excited ones.

  5. 2021 Honda X-ADV first impressions after fifty miles

    Thu, 25 Feb 2021. We've just taken collection of the updated 2021 Honda X-ADV, here are our first thoughts after 50-miles. THE Honda X-ADV has undergone its most significant update since its launch, with the 2021 model boasting a revised engine, new styling, and more tech for this year. It's a bike that has always eluded this particular ...

  6. Long term test: Honda X-ADV adventure scooter

    Honda Long term test: Honda X-ADV adventure scooter. Al Dowds. Mon, 20 Aug 2018. Al takes the X-ADV off-road at Goodwood, and gets C-bombed on it at the lights up town. I'VE HAD the Honda X-ADV for a while now, and I'm definitely getting into its queerly-styled groove. It's my go-to machine for urban schlepping, by a fair margin, and it ...

  7. HONDA X-ADV (2021

    4 out of 5 (4/5) Under the 2021 Honda X-ADV's bodywork lurks an all-new chassis that helps trim 1kg off the bike's wet weight while also increasing (marginally) the underseat storage. The ...

  8. 2021 Honda X-ADV Guide • Total Motorcycle

    Rake and trail is set at 27°/104mm with wheelbase of 1590mm. A 39° steering angle (and turning radius of 2.8m) makes the X-ADV manoeuvrable in tight traffic. Long travel suspension -153.5mm up front and 150mm from the rear - is matched to 165mm of ground clearance. Overall wet weight is 3kg lighter, at 236kg.

  9. Honda X-ADV

    Plenty of range for most trips. As well as the new swingarm, the X-ADV also gets new 41mm upside down front forks with adjustment for rebound and preload, whilst front brakes are radially-mounted Nissin calipers taken from the Africa Twin, fitted with twin 310mm discs. The rear shock is now adjustable for preload.

  10. New Honda X-ADV Review 2021

    Visordown has been out and about testing the new and updated 2021 #Honda #X-ADV. For this year the adventure crossover gets more power, increased mid-range t...

  11. Honda X-ADV (2019)

    The X-ADV's £10k list price is a lot of cash for a 54bhp NC750 wearing combat trousers. But that's no more than the top-spec BMW or Yamaha maxi-scooters, a lot less than Yamaha's 'don't-call-me-a-scooter' Niken and the Honda has a DCT gearbox as standard, which I love. Plus, if you shop around there are pre-registered, zero-mile X ...

  12. 2022 Honda X-ADV Guide • Total Motorcycle

    Rake and trail are set at 27°/104mm with wheelbase of 1590mm. A 39° steering angle (and turning radius of 2.8m) makes the X-ADV manoeuvrable in tight traffic. Long travel suspension -153.5mm up front and 150mm from the rear - is matched to 165mm of ground clearance. Overall wet weight is 236kg.

  13. Long term test: Honda X-ADV adventure scooter

    The X-ADV uses Honda's 745cc parallel twin, which is (in)famously made from half a Jazz car engine. It's used on the NC range - the NC750S and NC750X, where it does decent if slightly uninspiring work as a frugal commuter and midi-adventurer. It's a weird motor - the inlet and exhaust ports are siamesed, so there's only one exhaust ...

  14. Honda| X-ADV

    More powerful, 745cc, 8-valve parallel twin-cylinder engine. 69Nm of torque with 43.1kW peak power; the X-ADV can go from highway to trail in a flash, and the engine is tuned to deliver instant response. You also have an extra 600rpm to play with before the redline. And, for A2 licence holders, a 35kW conversion is available from your local ...

  15. Test du Honda X-ADV : mon avis après 1 semaine passée avec

    Je n'irai pas par quatre chemins, j'ai adoré cette semaine passée avec le X-ADV. Honda nous a sortie un hybride fun, différent de ce que propose la concurrence. A l'aise aussi bien sur le bitume que dans les chemins, il pourra vous emmener un peu partout et je m'imagine tout à fait partir en road-trip avec ce genre de machine.

  16. Honda X-ADV review

    Honda labels the X-ADV as a city adventure bike and I think that's about right. It's at its best in short, tight environments, and even if you never take the bike off-road the longer travel suspension still makes it ride the bumps and potholes of modern roads than much better than a regular scooter, or NC750X for example.

  17. ROAD TRIP Honda X-ADV 750 DCT

    Discover the performance and versatility of the Honda X-ADV 750 DCT in this road trip video. Watch the XADV in action and get inspired.

  18. ADV or cruiser for cross country road trip? : r/SuggestAMotorcycle

    The 3 main reasons an ADV is more comfortable - upright ergos, has ~7" of suspension travel (vrs ~4" on cruiser) and you can stand up on an ADV machine and you can't stand up on a cruiser with floorboards. Obviously a 900 pound Goldwing or Harley Ultra touring machine would be the most comfortable. 11. Reply.

  19. HONDA ADV350 (2022

    Super. Ride quality & brakes 5 out of 5. Engine 5 out of 5. Reliability & build quality 5 out of 5. Value vs rivals 5 out of 5. Equipment 5 out of 5. Read MCN's expert 2022-on Honda ADV350 bike ...

  20. Inspiration Friday: BMW ADV-X 2023 Adventure Tour

    Today BMW Motorrad Canada announced the launch of its first-ever adventure motorcycle tour in Canada, BMW Motorrad ADV-X. Set to take place from September 10 to 15, 2023, the tour will cover over 1880 km of mixed terrain in British Columbia's rocky mountain range, ideal for BMW Motorrad's world-renowned and award-winning range of GS models.

  21. All You NEED to Know: 2023 Honda X-ADV 750 In-Depth Review

    The Honda X-ADV 750 is a weird thing. It's a mix between an Africa Twin and Honda's Forza lineup; a scooter that can theoretically go offroad and still have ...

  22. Road Trip Planner

    Keep exploring with the Roadtrippers mobile apps. Anything you plan or save automagically syncs with the apps, ready for you when you hit the road! Plan your next trip, find amazing places, and take fascinating detours with the #1 trip planner. Every trip is a road trip.

  23. X-ADV 750

    Road trip avec mon frère et sa Goldwing DCT dans les environs de Saint-Emilion, ainsi que quelques passages en solo dans le Médoc.