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Travel Advisory July 27, 2023

Haiti - level 4: do not travel.

Last Update: Updated to reflect the Ordered Departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members for Embassy Port-au-Prince.

Do not travel to Haiti due to kidnapping, crime, civil unrest, and poor health care infrastructure. On July 27, 2023, the Department of State ordered the departure of family members of U.S. government employees and non-emergency U.S. government employees. U.S. citizens in Haiti should depart Haiti as soon as possible by commercial or other privately available transportation options, in light of the current security situation and infrastructure challenges. U.S. citizens wishing to depart Port-au-Prince should monitor local news and only do so when considered safe.

Country Summary : Kidnapping is widespread, and victims regularly include U.S. citizens. Kidnappers may use sophisticated planning or take advantage of unplanned opportunities, and even convoys have been attacked. Kidnapping cases often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings. Victim’s families have paid thousands of dollars to rescue their family members.

Violent crime, often involving the use of firearms, such as  armed robbery, carjackings, and kidnappings for ransom that include U.S. citizens are common. Mob killings against presumed criminals have been on the rise since late April. Travelers are sometimes followed and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. Robbers and carjackers also attack private vehicles stuck in heavy traffic congestion and often target lone drivers, particularly women. As a result, the U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport.

Protests, demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and can turn violent. The U.S. government is extremely limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Haiti – assistance on site is available only from local authorities (Haitian National Police and ambulance services). Local police generally lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. Shortages of gasoline, electricity, medicine, and medical supplies continue throughout much of Haiti. Public and private medical clinics and hospitals often lack qualified medical staff and even basic medical equipment and resources.

U.S. government personnel are limited only to the confined area around the Embassy and are prohibited from walking in Port-au-Prince. U.S. government personnel in Haiti are prohibited from:

  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs
  • Driving at night
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Traveling without prior approval and special security measures in place.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Haiti.

The Haitian Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) has confirmed an outbreak of cholera in the country.  

If you decide to travel to Haiti:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds. Do not attempt to drive through roadblocks.
  • Arrange airport transfers and hotels in advance, or have your host meet you upon arrival.
  • Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals (e.g. people without official uniforms or credentials) located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports.
  • If you are being followed as you leave the airport, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Travel by vehicle to minimize walking in public.
  • Travel in groups of at least two people.
  • Always keep vehicle doors locked and windows closed when driving.
  • Exercise caution and alertness, especially when driving through markets and other traffic congested areas.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Purchase travel insurance and medical evacuation insurance ahead of time.
  • Review information on  Travel to High-Risk Areas .
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  on Haiti.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

Embassy Messages

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Quick Facts

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Yes, for stays over 90 days. Foreign passport holders visiting Haiti must pay a tourist fee of $10.00 at the airport

None; however, review current COVID testing and vaccination guidance

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince

Boulevard du 15 October, Tabarre 41, Route de Tabarre Port-au-Prince, Haiti Telephone:  +(509) 2229-8000 / 2229-8900 Emergency After-Hours Telephone:  +(509) 2229-8000 Fax:  +(509) 2229-8027 Email:  [email protected]

American Citizen Services Unit office hours are 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Most routine services require an appointment; visit our Embassy webpage . The Embassy is closed on U.S. and local holidays.

Destination Description

Learn about the U.S. relationship to countries around the world.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

The Government of Haiti requires all non-Haiti citizens age 12 and over entering the country to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, or to present a negative COVID test.   No COVID test or vaccination is required for travelers under the age of 5 .  

Requirement for Entry: Passport valid for at least six months from date of arrival. Visit the Embassy of Haiti website for the most current visa information.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions:   The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Haiti.

Find information on dual nationality , prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

Safety and Security

Crime:  Embassy employees are prohibited from using public transportation and visiting certain areas of Port-au-Prince due to high crime. Political violence and violent crimes are common in Haiti, including murders, kidnappings, robberies, assaults, vehicle break-ins, and home invasions. Travelers are often targeted, followed, and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. For this reason, Embassy personnel are prohibited from traveling in personal vehicles to and from the airport. Also, the Embassy has procedures in place to detect surveillance and deter attacks on its employees.

Labadee, a port near Cap Haitien in the north - only accessible by cruise ship passengers - has private security and lower rates of reported crime. Travelers should exercise heightened  precautions,however, due to increasing insecurity nationwide.

Safety Precautions:

  • Be careful about providing your destination address in Haiti. Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports in Haiti.
  • As you leave the airport, make sure you are not being followed. If you notice you are being followed, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as jewelry or watches.
  • Embassy employees are prohibited from visiting banks and using ATMs. U.S. citizens are often followed, attacked and robbed soon after withdrawing money. If you must use an ATM, select one that is out of sight from the general public (such as inside your hotel), and be cautious at all times.
  • Do not resist a robbery or car-jacking attempt. Criminals may kill those who resist. 
  • If a situation makes you feel uncomfortable, leave immediately.
  • Be aware: drug traffickers have duped travelers into transporting narcotics aboard on commercial flights.
  • Be aware: crime rates tend to go up during holidays, particularly in crowded street festivities.

See the  Department of State  and the  FBI  pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault:  Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes. Police investigations may not meet U.S. standards and forensic medical services are very basic. While rape kits exist in Haiti, there is generally no capacity to collect or utilize samples for police investigation. Report crimes to the local police at (+509) 3838-1111 or (+509) 3733-3640, then call the U.S. Embassy at (+509) 2229-8000.

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

  • Help you find appropriate medical care
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • Contact relatives or friends if we receive your written consent
  • Explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • Provide a  list of attorneys in Haiti
  • Provide information on  victim’s compensation programs in the United States  
  • In cases of destitution, provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support
  • Help you find hotel accommodations and arrange a flight home
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport

Demonstrations  occur frequently.  They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events. 

  • Demonstrations can be unpredictable, avoid areas around protests and demonstrations. 
  • Past demonstrations have turned violent.
  • Check local media for updates and traffic advisories.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the Embassy for assistance.

No formal tourism industry infrastructure is in place on any level in most locations.  With the exception of Labadee, tourists are participating in activities at their own risk.  Emergency response and subsequent appropriate medical treatment is not available in-country.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

Hurricanes:  Hurricane season runs from June 1 – November 30 in the Atlantic. Roads and bridges may become impassible. Poor rescue services and weak infrastructure hamper the government’s ability to respond to storms.

For information on how to prepare and respond to storms and hurricanes:

  • https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes
  • Haiti Météo website
  • Local media broadcasts in Creole or French
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency

Earthquakes:  Haiti is prone to earthquakes. For information on what to do before, during, and after an earthquake, visit  https://www.ready.gov/earthquakes .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Prolonged pre-trial detention is common and prison conditions do not meet U.S. standards. Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities, prior to practicing or operating a business.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.  See our webpage for further information.

Real Estate Investments:  Be highly cautious. Property rights are irregularly enforced. Clear title to land is difficult or impossible to obtain. Consult an attorney before signing documents or closing on any real estate transactions. Undeveloped land is vulnerable to legal and physical takeover. Absentee owners may be assaulted by squatters when trying to reclaim their property. Litigation and eviction proceedings can take years. U.S. citizens involved in business/property disputes are sometimes arrested without charge and can spend months or years in pre-trial detention, waiting for their cases to be heard. The Embassy does not attend property dispute hearings but, as above, can assist U.S. citizens who have been arrested.

Firearms and Other Weapons:  Possession of firearms, ammunition, and dangerous weaponry is strictly prohibited to any person, unless the individual has a Haitian license or has been specifically authorized by Haitian authorities.  In order to bring a firearm into Haiti, an owner must obtain written permission in advance from the Director-General of the Haitian National Police (HNP).  Contact the “Centre de Renseignement de la police”/Information Center (CRO) at [email protected] or by telephones at 509-3838-1111 /509-3837-1111/509-3839-1111 for additional information.  Travelers caught entering Haiti with any type of weapon, including firearms or ammunitions, will likely face severe penalties, including prison time. U.S.-issued permits allowing an individual to carry weapons are not valid in Haiti.  Visit the Department’s  Traveling Abroad with Firearms webpage .

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad  

LGBTQI+ Travelers:  Anti-LGBTQI+ sentiment exists. While no laws criminalize sexual orientation or consensual same-sex conduct between adults, persons identified as LGBTQI+ may be targeted for harassment, discrimination, or physical attacks. See our LGBTQI+ Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers with Disabilities:   The law in Haiti prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities, but the law is not enforced.  Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is not as prevalent as in the United States, however.  Expect accessibility to be limited in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure.  Businesses rarely accommodate persons with disabilities and Haitian authorities do not enforce laws mandating public access for the disabled. Sidewalks, when present, are frequently congested by sidewalk commerce and parked cars.

Students:   See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:   Domestic violence and sexual assault are unfortunately common and not always investigated or prosecuted consistently or vigorously. See our travel tips for Women Travelers .

The Government of Haiti requires all non-Haiti citizens age 12 and over entering the country to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, or to present a negative COVID test. 

Medical facilities, including ambulance services, are scarce and generally sub-standard, especially outside the capital. Life-threatening emergencies often require evacuation to a point outside of Haiti by air ambulance at the patient's expense.  Lists of doctors, hospitals, and air ambulance services  are available at the Embassy website.

There is no functional national emergency services line in Haiti. The Embassy maintains a list of emergency telephone contacts.

Ambulance services may not be reliable in an emergency. Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi or private vehicle to the nearest major hospital rather than wait for an ambulance. Ambulance services are:

  • Not widely available and training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards.
  • Not equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment.
  • Often not staffed with trained paramedics and often have little or no medical equipment.

We do not pay medical bills.  Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas.  Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.  Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.  Check with the Haitian Ministry of Public Health to ensure the medication is legal in Haiti.

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Health facilities in general:

  • Public medical clinics often lack basic resources and supplies.
  • Hospitals and doctors often require payment “up front” prior to service or admission. Credit card payment is not always available.
  • Private hospitals usually require advance payment or proof of adequate insurance before admitting a patient.
  • Medical staff may speak little or no English.
  • Patients bear all costs for transfer to or between hospitals.
  • Psychological and psychiatric services are limited, even in the larger cities.

Water Quality

In most areas, tap water is not potable. Bottled water and beverages are generally safe, although you should be aware that many restaurants and hotels serve tap water unless bottled water is specifically requested.  Be aware that ice for drinks may be made using tap water.

General Health Language

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Chikungunya
  • Use the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended mosquito repellents and sleep under insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets.  Chemoprophylaxis is recommended for all travelers even for short stays.
  • There are shortages of food, water, medicine, medical supplies, etc. throughout Haiti.
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Resources for Travelers regarding specific issues in Haiti. 

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:   Traffic is extremely chaotic throughout the country and is frequently congested in urban areas. Lanes are not marked, and signs indicating the flow of traffic seldom exist. Roads are generally unmarked, and detailed, accurate maps are not widely available. GPS-based systems do usually work accurately, but the lack of road signage makes it hard to determine the indicated route. There are only a handful of stoplights in the country. Pedestrians regularly walk on the side of the road, and animals often dart into traffic. Even though driving is on the right side of the road, large potholes and flooding may cause drivers to swerve unpredictably and dangerously into the opposite lane of traffic. Speeding, aggressive driving, lack of traffic lights and signs, lack of right of way, unlit vehicles, and poor maintenance are the cause of many fatal traffic accidents in Haiti, as are overloaded vehicles on winding, mountainous and degraded roads. Motorcycles weave through traffic at high speeds. Driving under the influence is common at night. Traffic accidents are a major cause of death and injury, and extreme caution should be exercised. Those lacking knowledge of Haitian roads and traffic customs should hire a driver through a tour company or hotel. Heavy rains can cause mudslides and flooding that can quickly make conditions perilous. The Haitian government lacks adequate resources to assist drivers in distress or to clear the road of accidents or broken-down vehicles. If you are involved in an accident, do not expect medical or law enforcement assistance.

Public Transportation:  Public transportation consists of “tap-taps” (collective buses), private motorcycles for hire, and public buses and taxis in some cities or inter-city routes. Embassy personnel are prohibited from using any public transportation, and U.S. citizens are advised to avoid doing so due to the risk of crime. There is a significant risk of ejection in any accident, or even rough driving, due to lack of seat belts.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight:

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Haiti’s Civil Aviation Authority as not being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Haiti’s air carrier operations.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Haiti should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts .  Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website , and the NGA broadcast warnings .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Haiti . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report. 

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The C.D.C. adds several countries to a list that travelers should avoid.

cdc travel haiti

By Livia Albeck-Ripka

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its health advice for travel to six countries it now considers to be “very high” risk given the rapid spread of the coronavirus and the Delta variant. It is suggesting that people avoid traveling to these countries altogether, or if they must go, to get vaccinated beforehand.

The six countries — Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Morocco, the Bahamas and St. Martin in the Caribbean — have all had more than 500 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days, pushing them into the C.D.C.’s highest warning category.

Several other countries, including Brazil, Britain and Georgia — which currently has the highest daily global average, at 126 new cases a day per 100,000 people, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University — were already on the list.

The warnings come as the rapid spread of the Delta variant has upended travel plans for Americans amid a summer that many had hoped would include more freedoms thanks to high vaccination rates.

“Even fully vaccinated travelers may be at risk for getting and spreading Covid-19 variants,” the C.D.C. warns on its site. The agency also recommends against any international travel without full vaccination.

“The Covid-19 situation, including the spread of new or concerning variants, differs from country to country,” the agency says. “All travelers need to pay close attention to the conditions at their destination before traveling.”

Livia Albeck-Ripka is a reporter for The New York Times, currently based in California. She was previously a reporter for The Times's Australia bureau. More about Livia Albeck-Ripka

Protecting Health in Haiti Amid Crisis

In today’s interconnected world, it is more critical than ever to strengthen and preserve global health systems to prevent, detect and respond to disease outbreaks. However, despite steps taken to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is not yet prepared to meet future epidemic and pandemic threats. According to the 2021 Global Health Security Index, all countries remain dangerously unprepared for future epidemic and pandemic threats, and 70% lack the necessary capacity in clinics, hospitals, and community care centers. With the rise of zoonotic and drug resistant pathogens, these gaps make us all even more vulnerable.

Environmental disasters and armed conflict represent some of the biggest ongoing threats to global health security. In recent years, the already fragile health systems of Haiti have been devastated by both.

In August 2021, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck southwestern Haiti, killing more than 2,240 people and injuring approximately 12,700 others, just one month after the country was thrown into political turmoil by the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. Today, Haiti continues to face armed violence and political instability that are disrupting regional public health efforts. Lack of fuel and ongoing safety concerns have prevented the deployment of healthcare workers and resources to many high-need areas, and many hospitals are closed or are operating at an extremely limited capacity.

For over ten years, the CDC Foundation has been working with our international partners to support and strengthen Haiti’s capacity to monitor and address health crises. When an earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, killing over 200,000 people and destroying Haiti’s Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) building, the CDC Foundation supported reconstruction of two vital MSPP health facilities and has continued working with MSPP to monitor and control disease outbreaks and establish critical health infrastructure and outreach.

The Petionville community of Port au Prince, which was heavily damaged by the 2010 earthquake

The Ministry of Public Health and Population in downtown Port au Prince which were completely destroyed in the 2010 earthquake

CDC Foundation support allowed for construction of new buildings for the Ministry of Public Health and Population

Today, reinstating Haiti’s water systems after the 2021 earthquake is a top priority. Access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) is essential to prevent waterborne diseases, and Haiti’s current cholera outbreak reflects the urgency of this work. The CDC Foundation and our partners at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF and MSPP are rehabilitating preexisting water and sanitation infrastructure by increasing water storage capacity, repairing handwashing stations and latrines and providing soap and critical hygiene supplies. We are also supporting education and promotion of hygiene practices in health facilities and schools.

“In the wake of the 2021 earthquake and Haiti’s ongoing insecurity, having a strong WASH infrastructure helps us reduce the risk of infection,” said Rebecca Cook, MPH, senior program officer at the CDC Foundation. “These systems improve prevention and control and better prepare us for outbreaks like cholera, COVID-19 and other infectious diseases.”

Residents in the village of Trianon, Haiti, gather water from a spring-fed water point.

Drinking water and sanitation technicians test spring water for chlorination.

Chemists work in an on-site lab in Port-au-Prince to produce chlorine bleach as part of efforts to fight cholera.

The ongoing environmental challenges and political upheaval in Haiti have also slowed national COVID-19 vaccination efforts. Despite a 2021 donation of 500,000 COVID-19 vaccines through COVAX, a global initiative to increase vaccination rates around the world, growing mistrust of the government and the spread of misinformation led to poor vaccination rates.

Community awareness is key. It's not particular to Haiti. It's everywhere. Get the word out. Use the appropriate channels, use their language.

To overcome these difficulties, CDC Foundation partners address misinformation and bolster vaccine confidence and awareness through risk communication, community engagement and information-sharing. From 2020-2021, Georgetown University supported Haiti’s pandemic response by gathering data on public perspectives, attitudes and beliefs related to COVID-19 infection and vaccination, subsequently increasing vaccination rates.

An MSPP sign displaying COVID-19 health measures

Community health workers provide COVID-19 vaccinations to communities

Facing limited power supply, a health worker uses his phone to fill out forms

Our partners at Fondation pour la Santé Reproductrice et l’Education Familiale (FOSREF) have built upon this work by delivering information about the safety and importance of vaccination via tv, radio, fliers and education programs. In response to rising safety concerns, FOSREF created mobile vaccine teams to increase vaccine access, especially among women and people living with HIV.

“Community awareness is key. It's not particular to Haiti. It's everywhere. Get the word out. Use the appropriate channels, use their language,” said Johane Philogène Nonez MD, MSc., technical and program director at FORSEF.

Guided by community voices, the CDC Foundation and its partners will continue to mobilize resources for emergency response and preparedness in Haiti’s health systems. As we continue our efforts to bolster health security in Haiti and around the world, we must remember that no community, district, province or nation will be truly safe and healthy until all are.

Banner Photo Credit: UNICEF Haiti/2022/Grarup

This publication is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $3,980,000 with 86.5% funded by CDC/HHS and $620,400 or 13.5% funded by non-government source(s). The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government.

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Health COVID-19 Fact sheet, February 2024

Haiti has one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the world. As of fall 2022, only about 2.2 percent of the Haitian population was fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and less than 3.4 percent had received a first dose of the vaccine. Low demand for the vaccine and widespread misinformation are impeding the progress of Haiti's vaccination program. Rumors, conspiracy theories, and fake news around COVID-19 – particularly on social media and in religious and entertainment communities – remain a significant challenge. As COVID-19 safety restrictions are lifted in other countries, Haitians interpret that news as a sign COVID-19 is no longer a health concern. Furthermore, the long-standing political and economic crises in the country are worsened with armed gang violence, kidnappings, and fuel shortages. These daily threats and vulnerabilities make getting a COVID-19 vaccine a low priority.

The Ministry of Public Health and Population is modifying the National Vaccine Deployment Plan for the fiscal year 2022-2023 with the goal to increase the national COVID-19 vaccine coverage to 20 percent within 12 months. To achieve this goal, the Ministry of Public Health and Population will use a recovery strategy based on three axes: 1) a two-phase, large-scale COVID-19 vaccination campaign in all 10 departments, 2) gradual integration of the COVID-19 vaccine in all Extended Program Immunization institutions, and 3) strengthening health facilities that are providing COVID-19 vaccination services.

This image represents the cover page of the Haiti Health COVID-19 fact sheet

Malaria Information and Prophylaxis, by Country [H]

The information presented in this table is consistent 1 with the information in the CDC Health Information for International Travel (the “Yellow Book”).

1. Factors that affect local malaria transmission patterns can change rapidly and from year to year, such as local weather conditions, mosquito vector density, and prevalence of infection. Information in these tables is updated regularly. 2.  Refers to P. falciparum malaria unless otherwise noted. 3. Estimates of malaria species are based on best available data from multiple sources. Where proportions are not available, the primary species and less common species are identified. 4. Several medications are available for chemoprophylaxis . When deciding which drug to use, consider specific itinerary, length of trip, cost of drug, previous adverse reactions to antimalarials, drug allergies, and current medical history. All travelers should seek medical attention in the event of fever during or after return from travel to areas with malaria. 5. Primaquine and tafenoquine can cause hemolytic anemia in persons with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Before prescribing primaquine or tafenoquine, patients must be screened for G6PD deficiency using a quantitative test. 6. Mosquito avoidance includes applying topical mosquito repellant, sleeping under an insecticide treated bed net, and wearing protective clothing (e.g., long pants and socks, long sleeve shirt). For additional details on mosquito avoidance, see: https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/index.html 7. P. knowlesi is a malaria species with a simian host (macaque). Human cases have been reported from most countries in Southeast Asia and are associated with activities in forest or forest-fringe areas. This species of malaria has no known resistance to antimalarials.

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  • Section 2 - Interactions Between Travel Vaccines & Drugs
  • Section 2 - Travelers’ Diarrhea

Yellow Fever Vaccine & Malaria Prevention Information, by Country

Cdc yellow book 2024.

Author(s): Mark Gershman, Rhett Stoney (Yellow Fever) Holly Biggs, Kathrine Tan (Malaria)

The following pages present country-specific information on yellow fever (YF) vaccine requirements and recommendations, and malaria transmission information and prevention recommendations. Country-specific maps are included to aid in interpreting the information. The information in this chapter was accurate at the time of publication; however, it is subject to change at any time due to changes in disease transmission or, in the case of YF, changing entry requirements for travelers. Updated information reflecting changes since publication can be found in the online version of this book and on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travelers’ Health website. Recommendations for prevention of other travel-associated illnesses can also be found on the CDC Travelers’ Health website .

Yellow Fever Vaccine

Entry requirements.

Entry requirements for proof of YF vaccination under the International Health Regulations (IHR) differ from CDC’s YF vaccination recommendations. Under the IHR, countries are permitted to establish YF vaccine entry requirements to prevent the importation and transmission of YF virus within their boundaries. Certain countries require proof of vaccination from travelers arriving from all countries ( Table 5-25 ); some countries require proof of vaccination only for travelers above a certain age coming from countries with risk for YF virus transmission. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines areas with risk for YF virus transmission as countries or areas where YF virus activity has been reported currently or in the past, and where vectors and animal reservoirs exist.

Unless issued a medical waiver by a yellow fever vaccine provider, travelers must comply with entry requirements for proof of vaccination against YF.

WHO publishes a list of YF vaccine country entry requirements and recommendations for international travelers approximately annually. But because entry requirements are subject to change at any time, health care professionals and travelers should refer to the online version of this book and the CDC Travelers’ Health website for any updates before departure.

CDC Recommendations

CDC’s YF vaccine recommendations are guidance intended to protect travelers from acquiring YF virus infections during international travel. These recommendations are based on a classification system for destination-specific risk for YF virus transmission: endemic, transitional, low potential for exposure, and no risk ( Table 2-08 ). CDC recommends YF vaccination for travel to areas classified as having endemic or transitional risk (Maps 5-10 and 5-11 ). Because of changes in YF virus circulation, however, recommendations can change; therefore, before departure, travelers and clinicians should check CDC’s destination pages for up-to-date YF vaccine information.

Duration of Protection

In 2015, the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices published a recommendation that 1 dose of YF vaccine provides long-lasting protection and is adequate for most travelers. The recommendation also identifies specific groups of travelers who should receive additional doses, and others for whom additional doses should be considered (see Sec. 5, Part 2, Ch. 26, Yellow Fever ). In July 2016, WHO officially amended the IHR to stipulate that a completed International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis is valid for the lifetime of the vaccinee, and YF vaccine booster doses are not necessary. Moreover, countries cannot require proof of revaccination (booster) against YF as a condition of entry, even if the traveler’s last vaccination was >10 years ago.

Ultimately, when deciding whether to vaccinate travelers, clinicians should take into account destination-specific risks for YF virus infection, and individual risk factors (e.g., age, immune status) for serious YF vaccine–associated adverse events, in the context of the entry requirements. See Sec. 5, Part 2, Ch. 26, Yellow Fever , for a full discussion of YF disease and vaccination guidance.

Table 2-08 Yellow fever (YF) vaccine recommendation categories 1

Malaria prevention.

The following recommendations to protect travelers from malaria were developed using the best available data from multiple sources. Countries are not required to submit malaria surveillance data to CDC. On an ongoing basis, CDC actively solicits data from multiple sources, including WHO (main and regional offices); national malaria control programs; international organizations; CDC overseas offices; US military; academic, research, and aid organizations; and the published scientific literature. The reliability and accuracy of those data are also assessed.

If the information is available, trends in malaria incidence and other data are considered in the context of malaria control activities within a given country or other mitigating factors (e.g., natural disasters, wars, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic) that can affect the ability to control malaria or accurately count and report it. Factors such as the volume of travel to that country and the number of acquired cases reported in the US surveillance system are also examined. In developing its recommendations, CDC considers areas within countries where malaria transmission occurs, substantial occurrences of antimalarial drug resistance, the proportions of species present, and the available malaria prophylaxis options.

Clinicians should use these recommendations in conjunction with an individual risk assessment and consider not only the destination but also the detailed itinerary, including specific cities, types of accommodations, season, and style of travel, as well as special health conditions (e.g., pregnancy). Several medications are available for malaria prophylaxis. When deciding which drug to use, consider the itinerary and length of trip, travelers’ previous adverse reactions to antimalarials, drug allergies, medical history, and drug costs. For a thorough discussion of malaria and guidance for prophylaxis, see Sec. 5, Part 3, Ch. 16, Malaria .

Entry requirements : Required for travelers ≥1 year old arriving from countries with risk for YF virus transmission. 1

CDC recommendations : Not recommended

  • All (including Labadee, also known as Port Labadee)
  • P. falciparum (99%)
  • P. malariae  (rare)
  • Atovaquone-proguanil, chloroquine, doxycycline, mefloquine, tafenoquine 3

Other Vaccines to Consider

See Health Information for Travelers to Haiti .

1 Current as of November 2022. This is an update of the 2010 map created by the Informal WHO Working Group on the Geographic Risk of Yellow Fever.

2 Refers to Plasmodium falciparum malaria, unless otherwise noted.

3 Tafenoquine can cause potentially life-threatening hemolysis in people with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Rule out G6PD deficiency with a quantitative laboratory test before prescribing tafenoquine to patients.

4 Mosquito avoidance includes applying topical mosquito repellant, sleeping under an insecticide-treated mosquito net, and wearing protective clothing (e.g., long pants and socks, long-sleeve shirt). For additional details on insect bite precautions, see Sec. 4, Ch. 6, Mosquitoes, Ticks & Other Arthropods.

5 Primaquine can cause potentially life-threatening hemolysis in people with G6PD deficiency. Rule out G6PD deficiency with a quantitative laboratory test before prescribing primaquine to patients.

6 P. knowlesi is a malaria species with a simian (macaque) host. Human cases have been reported from most countries in Southwest Asia and are associated with activities in forest or forest-fringe areas. P. knowlesi has no known resistance to antimalarials.

Yellow Fever Maps

2 In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expanded its YF vaccination recommendations for travelers going to Brazil because of a large YF outbreak in multiple states in that country. Please refer to the CDC  Travelers’ Health website for more information and updated recommendations.

3 YF vaccination is generally not recommended for travel to areas where the potential for YF virus exposure is low. Vaccination might be considered, however, for a small subset of travelers going to these areas who are at increased risk for exposure to YF virus due to prolonged travel, heavy exposure to mosquitoes, or inability to avoid mosquito bites. Factors to consider when deciding whether to vaccinate a traveler include destination-specific and travel-associated risks for YF virus infection; individual, underlying risk factors for having a serious YF vaccine–associated adverse event; and destination entry requirements.

The following authors contributed to the previous version of this chapter: Mark D. Gershman, Emily S. Jentes, Rhett J. Stoney (Yellow Fever) Kathrine R. Tan, Paul M. Arguin (Malaria)

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Family of Georgia trooper killed on duty receives his college diploma

Helas Cenescar , father of Georgia State Patrol Trooper Jimmy Cenescar cries after being presented with an honorary diploma during Gwinnett College Graduation at Gas South Arena in Duluth on Thursday. Cenescar, who was supposed to graduate, was killed in the line of duty in January. (Natrice Miller/ AJC)

Credit: Natrice Miller/AJC

State Trooper Jimmy Cenescar was months away from completing his bachelor’s degree when he killed in the line of duty in January.

His family was presented with his diploma during Thursday’s Georgia Gwinnett College graduation ceremony, the college announced. Cenescar was studying criminal justice and planned to pursue leadership roles, his obituary states.

“Jimmy passed doing what he loved,” his brother, Joel Cenescar, said during the funeral service . “His job was what he did.”

The GGC held its graduation ceremony at Gas South Arena in Duluth with more than 900 receiving diplomas, a record for the college.

Trooper Cenescar was killed in a crash Jan. 28 while pursuing a motorcyclist accused of violating several traffic laws on I-85 in Gwinnett County. He was 28.

In April, the Gwinnett grand jury indicted Gerson Danilo Ayala-Rodriguez , 21, for murder after he allegedly fled from Cenescar, who then crashed and died the district attorney said. Earlier this week, Ayala-Rodriguez was denied bond.

Gov. Brian Kemp and numerous law enforcement officers joined grieving friends and loved ones at the February service at Mount Paran Church in Atlanta.

“We consider this a deep loss for our entire state,” Kemp said, “and we are grieving with you.”

A native of Haiti, Cenescar moved with his family to the U.S. as a 4-year-old and was raised in Orlando before the family settled in Paulding County.

Cenescar was working for the Atlanta Police Department in 2021 when a man flagged him down during one overnight shift. A red BMW had plunged off a northwest Atlanta bridge, and the driver was still inside as the car dangled over a segment of the Norfolk Southern-Inman rail yard.

Jimmy Cenescar rescued a driver who plunged from a bridge in October 2021.

Credit: Atlanta police

icon to expand image

After getting permission from a supervisor, Cenescar pushed through a locked gate with his patrol vehicle so he could rescue the driver.

“It was a very chaotic scene. I just knew I had to get everything under control,” Cenescar said at the time. “My training kicked in and I just took action.”

He joined the Georgia State Patrol after three years with the Atlanta Police Department.

Cenescar is survived by his fiancée, his parents, a sister and four brothers.

About the Author

Alexis Stevens is a member of the Crime and Public Safety team.

Graduates celebrate at Sanford Stadium during the University of Georgia spring commencement in Athens on Friday, May 10, 2024. (Arvin Temkar / AJC)

Credit: [email protected]

A painting of 15-year-old Mia Dieguez is seen before a balloon release at Brook Run Park in Dunwoody on Wednesday. The Dunwoody High School student died after a medical emergency Monday. Arvin Temkar/AJC

Credit: Alex Sanz

U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Rome, made an unsuccessful bid this past week to oust House Speaker Mike Johnson, R-La. While some of her constituents in northwest Georgia's 14th Congressional District supported the effort, others saw it as vain and self-serving. (Kenny Holston/The New York Times)

Credit: NYT

Alonzo L. McMillian, left, the deputy warden for administration at Pulaski State Prison, and Russell Edwin Clark, right, a lieutenant at Lee Arrendale State Prison, were arrested within 24 hours of each other earlier this month on charges that they engaged in sexual contact with individuals in custody and violated their oaths as officers. (Pulaski County Sheriff's Office and Habersham Sheriff's Office)

Credit: Habersham Sheriff's Office

Credit: Channel 2 Action News

ajc.com

Royal Caribbean cancels visits to Labadee in Haiti amid continued violence

cdc travel haiti

Royal Caribbean International has suspended stops at private destination Labadee in Haiti through the summer amid continued violence in the country.

“The safety and security of our guests, crew, and communities we visit are our top priority,” a spokesperson for the cruise line said in an emailed statement. “Our Global Security and Intel Team is closely monitoring the evolving situation in Haiti, and in an abundance of caution we have suspended all visits to Labadee fleetwide through September 2024.”

Royal Caribbean plans to “continue to monitor and reassess calls as needed” and will notify guests of any updates, the spokesperson added.

The line previously suspended numerous planned calls to Labadee following fresh gang violence that prompted the country to declare a state of emergency in early March.

Was your cruise itinerary changed?: What to do next

The U.S. State Department has had a Level 4 advisory – its highest warning against travel to the destination – in place since before President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated in 2021. About 2,500 people were killed or injured as a result of gang violence in Haiti in the first quarter of 2024, according to the United Nations.

Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Nashville. You can reach him at [email protected].

IMAGES

  1. Haiti

    cdc travel haiti

  2. Protecting Health in Haiti Amid Crisis

    cdc travel haiti

  3. CDC Travel Guidelines: What You Need to Know

    cdc travel haiti

  4. Navigating Recovery in Haiti

    cdc travel haiti

  5. Rabies in Haiti

    cdc travel haiti

  6. COVID travel: CDC says fully vaccinated people can travel at low risk

    cdc travel haiti

COMMENTS

  1. Haiti

    Malaria. CDC recommends that travelers going to Haiti take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

  2. Haiti

    Support from the international community over the past 20 years has helped stabilize the prevalence of HIV in Haiti; the estimated prevalence is 2% among adults aged >15 years. Among people 15-24 years age of age, infection is disproportionately greater among women than men (2.3% vs. 1.6%).

  3. Travelers' Health

    More. Learn about CDC's Traveler Genomic Surveillance Program that detects new COVID-19 variants entering the country. Sign up to get travel notices, clinical updates, & healthy travel tips. CDC Travelers' Health Branch provides updated travel information, notices, and vaccine requirements to inform international travelers and provide ...

  4. Haiti Travel Advisory

    Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. Traveling without prior approval and special security measures in place. Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Haiti. The Haitian Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) has confirmed an outbreak of cholera in the country.

  5. Haiti

    Supplies to prevent illness or injury. Hand sanitizer or wipes. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol or antibacterial hand wipes. Water purification tablets. See CDC recommendations: Water Disinfection. Water purification tablets. May be needed if camping or visiting remote areas. Insect repellent.

  6. CDC in Haiti

    Global Health Security. CDC's global health security efforts in Haiti help improve the country's ability to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease outbreaks before they become global epidemics. These efforts are helping Haiti reach the targets outlined in the Global Health Security Agenda.CDC is supporting the government of Haiti to minimize disease threats by bolstering ...

  7. Haiti International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  8. PDF Travelers' Health Fact Sheet

    National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Division of Global Migration and Quarantine Fact Sheet - August 2015 - Page 1 of 2. The Division of Global Migration and Quarantine's (DGMQ) Travelers' Health Branch (proposed name) monitors, analyzes, and reports occurrences of diseases and events of global public health ...

  9. CDC Expands Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement ...

    Before departure to the United States, a required test, combined with the CDC recommendations to get tested again 3-5 days after arrival and stay home for 7 days post-travel, will help slow the spread of COVID-19 within US communities from travel-related infections.

  10. cdc-750

    Travel & Tourism in the U.S. Visit the U.S.! ... Outside of Office Hours, contact: 509-2229-8000 . Outside of Haiti: 301-985-8925. International Parental Child Abduction; Arrest of a U.S. Citizen ... CDC Expands Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement to All Air Passengers Entering the United States | cdc-750. By | 13 January, 2021 | Topics: U.S ...

  11. Disease Patterns in Travelers

    Accounting for behaviors that can influence and potentially increase risk for travel-associated infections and diseases (e.g., attendance at a mass gathering, long-term or adventure travel, visiting friends and family) helps the astute clinician make directed travel health recommendations and focus their attention on the more likely diagnoses ...

  12. Health Alert: U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    Location: Haiti. Event: As of April 18, 2022, the Haitian government put new COVID-19 requirements in place.The Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) announced that fully vaccinated individuals will no longer need to present a negative COVID-19 antigen or PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel.

  13. Before You Go » Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Medicine

    Visit CDC: Haiti Visit the CDC website to see what vaccines are recommended, how to protect yourself from disease transmission, what disease alerts are currently occuring in Haiti, and what to do if you get sick after your trip. Travel Alerts and Warnings for Haiti. Visit Travel.State.gov: Haiti Stay informed on any travel alerts or warnings in ...

  14. The C.D.C. adds several countries to a list that travelers should avoid

    The six countries — Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Morocco, the Bahamas and St. Martin in the Caribbean — have all had more than 500 cases per 100,000 residents in the past 28 days, pushing them into ...

  15. Protecting Health in Haiti Amid Crisis

    Banner Photo Credit: UNICEF Haiti/2022/Grarup. This publication is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $3,980,000 with 86.5% funded by CDC/HHS and $620,400 or 13.5% funded by non-government source(s).

  16. Information for Travelers

    Report crimes to the local police at (+509) 3838-1111 or (+509) 3733-3640, then call the U.S. Embassy at (+509) 2229-8900 during business hours, or (+509) 2229-8000 after hours. See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas. We can: Hurricanes: Hurricane season runs from June 1 - November 30 in the Atlantic.

  17. Health COVID-19 Fact sheet, February 2024

    Haiti has one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the world. As of fall 2022, only about 2.2 percent of the Haitian population was fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and less than 3.4 percent had received a first dose of the vaccine. Low demand for the vaccine and widespread misinformation are impeding the progress of Haiti's vaccination ...

  18. Haiti, Jamaica changing COVID travel protocols for visitors

    Haiti is putting new COVID requirements in place as of Monday. Fully vaccinated visitors will no longer need to present a negative COVID-19 antigen or PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel. But ...

  19. Travelers

    Malaria Information and Prophylaxis, by Country [H] The information presented in this table is consistent 1 with the information in the CDC Health Information for International Travel (the "Yellow Book"). Present throughout the country and in Roatán and other Bay Islands. None in San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa.

  20. PDF CDC in Haiti

    CDC in Haiti The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began working with Haiti's Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) in 2002 to address the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic. Initially focused on prevention and treatment services, CDC's HIV ... Haiti | Travelers' Health | CDC Haiti Yellow Book 2024 ...

  21. Yellow Fever Vaccine & Malaria Prevention Information, by Country

    CDC Yellow Book 2024. Preparing International Travelers. Author (s): Mark Gershman, Rhett Stoney (Yellow Fever) Holly Biggs, Kathrine Tan (Malaria) The following pages present country-specific information on yellow fever (YF) vaccine requirements and recommendations, and malaria transmission information and prevention recommendations.

  22. PDF Travel Health Alert Notices and Haiti Cholera Outbreak ...

    The rapidly escalating epidemic in Haiti and the historically high travel volume between Haiti and the United States during December and January prompted CDC to distribute T-HANs to travelers from Haiti to reduce the risk for delayed health care. Typically, 8-10 direct fl ights from Haiti arrive daily in the United States at 4 airports:

  23. Negative COVID-19 Test Required for Travel to ...

    The U.S. Department of State and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) remind all travelers that beginning tomorrow, January 26, all air passengers two years of age or older arriving to the United States must provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test or proof of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding.

  24. Haiti crisis: Transitional government names new council president ...

    Members of Haiti's transitional council: Edgard Leblanc Fils, Regine Abraham, and Fritz Alphonse Jean in Port-au-Prince on April 25.

  25. Family of trooper killed on duty receives his college diploma today

    State Trooper Jimmy Cenescar was months away from completing his bachelor's degree when he killed in the line of duty in January. His family will be presented with his diploma during today's ...

  26. Royal Caribbean suspends stops in Haiti's Labadee through September

    About 2,500 people were killed or injured as a result of gang violence in Haiti in the first quarter of 2024, according to the United Nations. Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA ...