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Ghana Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

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After Your Trip

Map - Ghana

Be aware of current health issues in Ghana. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

There is no longer active cholera transmission and vaccine is not recommended.

Cholera - CDC Yellow Book

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Ghana.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers of all ages traveling to Ghana.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to Ghana take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Ghana.

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Meningitis (Meningococcal disease)

Recommended for travelers 2 months old or older traveling to  areas of Ghana  that are part of the meningitis belt during the dry season.

Meningococcal disease - CDC Yellow Book

Meningitis Belt Map

In Ghana poliovirus has been identified in the past year.

Travelers to Ghana are at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus.

Vaccine recommendations : Adults traveling to Ghana who received a complete polio vaccination series as children may receive a single lifetime booster dose of inactivated polio vaccine; travelers who are unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated should receive a complete polio vaccination series before travel. Children who are not fully vaccinated will be considered for an  accelerated vaccination schedule .

Polio - CDC Yellow Book

Polio: For Travelers

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Ghana. If you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Ghana, there may be limited or no rabies treatment available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Ghana. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Yellow Fever

Required for all arriving travelers ≥9 months old.

Recommended for all travelers ≥9 months old.

Yellow Fever - CDC Yellow Book

  • Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Schistosomiasis

  • Wading, swimming, bathing, or washing in contaminated freshwater streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, or untreated pools.

Avoid bug bites

African tick-bite fever.

  • Avoid Bug Bites

African Tick-bite fever

Chikungunya

  • Mosquito bite
  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite

Airborne & droplet

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Lassa Fever

  • Breathe in air or eat food contaminated with the urine or droppings of infected rats
  • Touch the body fluids of a person infected with Lassa virus or objects contaminated with infected body fluids

Lassa fever

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Ghana, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Ghana. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Some diseases in Ghana—such as dengue, leishmaniasis, and African sleeping sickness—are spread by bugs and cannot be prevented with a vaccine. Follow the insect avoidance measures described above to prevent these and other illnesses.

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Ghana include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Schistosomiasis, a parasitic infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Ghana. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Ghana’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in Ghana. Fill your malaria prescription before you leave and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Ghana may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Ghana, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Ghana, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Ghana .

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

To call for emergency services while in Ghana, dial 193 for an ambulance, 192 for the fire department, and 191 for the police. Write these numbers down to carry with you during your trip.

Learn as much as you can about Ghana before you travel there. A good place to start is the country-specific information on Ghana from the US Department of State.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Ghana for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

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travel warning ghana

COVID 19 UPDATE AS AT 20TH MAY 2023

travel warning ghana

Embassy of Ghana, Washington DC

GHANA TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS

Individuals traveling to Ghana are required to strictly adhere to the following new directives as stated by Ghana’s President during his 16 th address to the Nation on Measures Taken Against the Spread of the Coronavirus:

  • All passengers arriving in Ghana must be in possession of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from an accredited laboratory in the country of origin and the test must have been done not more than seventy-two (72) hours before the scheduled arrival in the country. All airlines have been instructed to ensure compliance with this directive for all passengers traveling to Ghana;
  • All passengers would be required to undergo a mandatory COVID-19 test at the airport terminal upon arrival in Ghana at a fee of one hundred and fifty dollars ($150.00) to be borne by the passenger. The test result will be available within thirty (30) minutes;
  • Children under the age of five (5) will not be required to undergo testing at the airport;
  • Passengers who test positive for COVID-19 will be handled by the health authorities for further clinical assessment and management; and
  • Passengers who test negative will be admitted into the country and will be advised to continue to observe COVID-19 safety precautions during their stay in Ghana.

Ministry of Health / Ghana Health Service Guidelines

INTRODUCTION 

Following the declaration of the novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a global Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30th January 2020, several countries instituted measures to curb the spread of the disease. In Ghana, similar measures were instituted in addition to the Executive Instrument (EI) 61 requiring some practices to be enforced.

As part of plans to reopen the Kotoka International Airport (KIA) on Tuesday, September 1, 2020, the Ghana Health Service/Ministry of Health has instituted measures to prevent and control the spread of COVID 19 in Ghana related to international travel. The outlined measures below are applicable to flight crew and passengers arriving and/or departing KIA within the period of reopening the airport to international travel until further advised.

The Ghana Health Service in collaboration with other partners will provide Port Health Services to ensure safety of flight crew, passengers and users of the airport. Port Health Services at the airport includes all health-related activities within the terminal including laboratory testing, inspection of relevant health documents, screening and triaging of passengers and the management of ill persons including transfer to appropriate health facilities; environmental inspections, supervision of cleaning and disinfection of aircraft and the entire airport terminal among others.

COVID-19 PROTOCOLS FOR DEPARTING AND ARRIVING PASSENGERS 

All passengers departing or arriving on international flights at KIA including those from the ECOWAS region will be required to meet the health requirements outlined below prior to admission into Ghana by the Ghana Immigration Service.

  • Departing Passengers 

All passengers on international flights departing KIA will be required to adhere to COVID-19 testing requirements for the destination countries. All persons must be wearing a face mask appropriately (extending from the middle of the nasal bridge to halfway between the chin and the neck) and adhere to social distancing and hygiene protocols. Departing passengers will under g o COVID-19 screening including the checking of temperature.

  • Arriving Passengers 

All arriving passengers must not have any symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 including body temperature >38°C. They must be in possession of a COVID-19 negative PCR test result from an accredited laboratory in the country of origin. The test should have been done not more than 72 hours before the scheduled departure time from the country of origin. For passengers who transit through other countries before arriving in Ghana, the first country of departure will be the reference point. For passengers who depart Ghana and return within one (1) week, the passengers will not be required to present a COVID-19 test result from the country of departure. A negative COVID-19 test from Ghana used on departure will serve as evidence of meeting the COVID-19 test criteria for arriving in Ghana. In addition, all persons must be wearing face masks appropriately upon arrival (extending from the middle of the nasal bridge to halfway between the chin and the neck). All passengers will be subjected to a mandatory COVID-19 test at the airport terminal at the cost to the passenger. All persons testing positive will receive further clinical assessment and treatment. All persons testing negative will be advised to continue to observe COVID-19 safety precautions following arrival in Ghana.

  • 5 . Exemptions 

The following categories of passengers and crew are exempt from COVID-19 PCR test Testing:

  • Children under-5 years of age will not be required to undergo testing at the airport;
  • Persons who arrive under emergency circumstances such as diverted flights will not be required to undergo testing if they do not leave the airport or if they remain in transit such that they do not leave the hotel; and
  • Airline crew are exempt from the pre-departure and arrival testing and should follow airline policy for testing.

MANAGEMENT OF CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES

All persons testing positive will receive further clinical assessment and treatment. Confirmed COVID 19 positive will be handled by the Port Health Unit for the remainder of their arrival processes. Following completion of the arrival procedures, they will be sent to the Ga East Municipal Hospital for further clinical assessment and management. All persons testing negative will be advised to continue to observe COVID-19 safety precautions following arrival in Ghana.

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travel warning ghana

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad
  • Foreign travel advice

Before you travel, check the ‘Entry requirements’ section for Ghana’s current entry restrictions and requirements. These may change with little warning. Monitor this advice for the latest updates and stay in contact with your travel provider.

If you plan to pass through another country to return to the UK, check the travel advice for the country you’re transiting.

It is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCDO ’s guidance on foreign travel insurance .

Around 90,000 British nationals visit Ghana every year. While most visits are trouble-free, crime does occur. In recent years, reported crime has increased, particularly over the Christmas period. Criminal activity ranging from petty street crime, to violent crime can occur at any time. The use of weapons is increasing. Take sensible precautions. Be particularly vigilant in public areas, and take care when travelling by road. See Crime

It is mandatory for all foreign nationals resident in Ghana to register with the National Identification Authority (NIA) of Ghana and get a non-citizen Ghana card. See Local laws and customs

Localised outbreaks of civil unrest can occur at short notice, and can become violent (sometimes involving weapons). You should remain vigilant, avoid any large public gatherings and demonstrations, monitor local media for up-to-date information, and follow the advice of local authorities. See Local travel

Terrorist attacks in Ghana can’t be ruled out. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places visited by foreigners. See Terrorism

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission .

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

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Ghana's Covid restrictions: Unvaccinated must get jabs on arrival

  • Published 10 December 2021
  • Coronavirus

A person getting a vaccine in Ghana

Ghana is introducing some of the world's strictest Covid travel rules, by banning any adult who has not been vaccinated from flying in with effect from Monday.

There is no option to self-isolate.

Ghanaian citizens and residents abroad are exempt for up to two weeks, but will be required to get jabbed upon landing at the airport.

The authorities say they are concerned about a surge of infections over the festive period.

Many other countries have avoided an outright blanket ban on unvaccinated arrivals, such as members of the European Union and the United States .

Ghana's land and sea borders have been closed to passenger traffic since restrictions were first introduced at the start of the pandemic.

Alongside the new measures, Ghanaian authorities will also still insist that all arrivals present a negative PCR test.

All Ghanaians flying out of the country will also need to be fully vaccinated.

This means that a Ghanaian national who is not currently vaccinated but gets a jab at the airport would have to wait until getting a second dose before they were able to fly out, unless they get one from Johnson and Johnson.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends an eight- to 12-week gap between the first and second dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine and a 21- to 28-day gap between the two Pfizer shots. The Moderna and Sputnik V also require two doses for maximum immunity.

Vaccinations to be ramped up

Ghana's authorities are worried about a new wave of coronavirus infections caused by the Omicron variant among international arrivals.

"The expected increase during the festive season calls for urgent actions to prevent a major surge in Covid-19 cases in Ghana," the head of the Ghana Health Service, Patrick Kuma-Aboagye, said in a statement.

He said that over the last two weeks, cases detected at Ghana's main airport, Kotoka, accounted for about 60% of all new confirmed Covid infections in the country.

The new travel guidelines have been met with mixed reactions among Ghanaians, with some supporting them and others saying people should have the right to choose, says the BBC's Favour Nunoo in Accra.

With relatively few cases of Covid in the country, many Ghanaians do not feel overly concerned by the pandemic and so have not felt compelled to get immunized, he adds.

Less than 10% of Ghana's population have currently been vaccinated - partly because of a lack of vaccines in the country until recently.

In an interview with BBC Focus on Africa, Mr Kuma-Aboagye brushed off the concerns of those who may not want to get jabbed.

"If you decide to come, then it means that you want to be vaccinated," he said.

In the last wave more than 90% of those admitted to hospital were unvaccinated, he added.

The authorities plan to ramp up efforts to immunize the population in January, by making it compulsory for government employees, students and health workers to get the vaccine, reports the Reuters news agency.

Vaccine passports will also be required to enter venues with large crowds like nightclubs and sports stadiums.

Since the start of the pandemic, Ghana has reported 131,246 cases and 1,228 Covid fatalities.

You may also be interested in:

  • AFRICA LIVE: For more on this and stories from around the continent
  • ANALYSIS: Do travel bans work against Covid?
  • EXPLAINER: Why is Nigeria destroying Covid vaccines?

Related Topics

  • Covid passports

travel warning ghana

Ghana Travel Restrictions

Traveler's COVID-19 vaccination status

Traveling from the United States to Ghana

Open for vaccinated visitors

COVID-19 testing

Not required

Not required for vaccinated visitors

Restaurants

Not required on public transportation.

Entry details & exceptions

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Can I travel to Ghana from the United States?

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Ghana.

Can I travel to Ghana if I am vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated visitors from the United States can enter Ghana without restrictions.

Can I travel to Ghana without being vaccinated?

Unvaccinated visitors from the United States can enter Ghana without restrictions.

Do I need a COVID test to enter Ghana?

Visitors from the United States are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Ghana.

Can I travel to Ghana without quarantine?

Travelers from the United States are not required to quarantine.

Do I need to wear a mask in Ghana?

Mask usage in Ghana is not required on public transportation.

Are the restaurants and bars open in Ghana?

Restaurants in Ghana are open. Bars in Ghana are .

Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

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travel warning ghana

Latest update

Exercise a high degree of caution in Ghana overall due to the threat of crime.

Higher levels apply in some areas.

Ghana

Ghana (PDF 253.16 KB)

Africa (PDF 1.68 MB)

Local emergency contacts

Fire and rescue services, medical emergencies.

Call 193 or go to the hospital.

Call 191 or go to the nearest police station.

Advice levels

Exercise a high degree of caution in Ghana overall.

Do not travel to the northern border with Burkina Faso.

Do not travel to the northern border with Burkina Faso due to the threat of attacks and kidnapping from terrorists and other groups active in Burkina Faso.

See Safety .

Reconsider your need to travel to the Upper East and Upper West regions.

Reconsider your need to travel to the Upper East and Upper West regions due to the heightened risk of terrorist attacks in Ghana’s northern border areas and the ongoing chieftaincy conflict in Bawku.

  • There's been an increase in reported incidents of banditry involving passenger buses travelling in the Upper West and Upper East regions resulting in injuries and deaths. In July 2023, a passenger bus travelling from Kumasi to Bawku was attacked at a fuel station in Walewale resulting in several injuries.
  • If you're travelling to Ghana, you could be a target for crime, including kidnapping and robbery. There are increased security risks if you're a woman travelling alone. Take particular care in and around Accra.
  • Avoid demonstrations and protests. Large public events and intercommunity disputes can turn violent. Be cautious around large crowds, like football matches.
  • Internet scams often originate in West African countries. Criminals may ask for details of safe bank accounts to transfer large amounts of money. Criminals often meet their victims through internet dating sites or chat rooms. Be wary of online contact from people you don't know. Don't send money until you've checked who you're sending it to. Don't travel to Ghana to get your money back or to get revenge.

Power outages may occur after dark. This often leads to more crime, especially if street and traffic lights fail.

  • Officials or people posing as officials may try to extort money from foreigners, including at the airport. Legitimate airport staff wear a current ID card with their name and photograph.

Full travel advice: Safety

  • Yellow fever, malaria and other insect-borne diseases are common, as are waterborne, foodborne and other infectious diseases, such as cholera, hepatitis , lassa fever, meningococcal meningitis, bilharzia and tuberculosis. Avoid insect bites, ice cubes, and raw or undercooked food. Drink boiled or bottled water. Consider what vaccinations and medicine you need.
  • Lassa fever may be  a risk when you have contact with rodents or with food or household items contaminated with rodent droppings. 
  • HIV/AIDS is common in Ghana. Take precautions if you're engaging in high-risk activities.
  • If there is a serious outbreak of infectious disease, follow the advice of local authorities.
  • Medical and emergency services are very limited. You may need to pay cash up front, even in an emergency. Make sure you have the right insurance and enough money to cover all your costs. 

Full travel advice: Health

  • Penalties for drug offences are severe. They include mandatory jail terms.

The death penalty can apply for serious offences, such as murder.

  • Same-sex activity is illegal and could lead to prison sentences. LGBTI relationships and identities are interpreted as illegal by society. Violence, threats, extortion, eviction and arbitrary arrest of LGBTI people occur, and the introduction of an anti-LGBTI bill in 2021 has increased these risks to the LGBTI community. LGBTI travellers should consider travel plans and personal security carefully.
  • Other activities that are legal in Australia are illegal in Ghana.
  • Ghana recognises dual nationality. Always travel on your Australian passport.

Full travel advice: Local laws

  • You need a visa to travel to Ghana. If you're staying for more than 90 days in 12 months, you must register for a  National Identification Authority Non-citizen Ghana card . Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. You should contact the nearest high commission/embassy or consulate of Ghana for the latest details.
  • You need to show a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate and proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 to enter Ghana. You may also need to show it when you leave.
  • There's increased reporting of incidents involving passenger buses travelling in the Upper West and Upper East regions resulting in injuries and deaths. In July a passenger bus travelling from Kumasi to Bawku was attacked at a fuel station in Walewale resulting in several injuries.
  • Road safety and driving in Ghana can be dangerous. Police roadblocks are common. Carry photo ID, vehicle registration and ownership papers. Be alert to hazards, especially at night. Only use registered taxis and limousines. Arrange these through your hotel. Due to safety and security concerns, don't use public transport or taxis hailed on the street.

Full travel advice: Travel

Local contacts

  • The Consular Services Charter tells you what the Australian government can and can't do to help when you're overseas.
  • For consular help, contact the Australian High Commission, Accra .
  • To stay up to date with local information, follow the High Commission’s social media accounts.

Full travel advice: Local contacts

Full advice

If you're travelling to Ghana, you could be a target for:

  • bag snatching
  • petty theft
  • pickpocketing

Your risk increases if you're a woman travelling alone. Take particular care in and around Accra.

Some taxi passengers have been robbed by drivers.

Attacks on passengers in vehicles are also on the increase. Take particular care when stationary. Keep windows up and doors locked. Some of these attacks on vehicles also involve the use of weapons.

Criminals may also target you in:

  • house invasions
  • armed robbery (including in a taxi)
  • other violent crimes

Officials or people posing as officials may try to detain foreigners or extort money from them, including at the airport. 

Legitimate airport staff wear a current ID card with their name and photograph.

To protect yourself from crime:

  • only use registered taxis or limousines, arrange these through your hotel.
  • don't use taxis hailed on the street or other public transport
  • don't walk alone, particularly in the evening and at night
  • avoid travelling alone, especially if you're a woman
  • keep your car windows up and doors locked, even when moving
  • be alert when approaching traffic lights
  • lock your accommodation, including when you're inside

Scams and fraud

Internet scams  come in many forms, including romance, friendship, business and employment opportunities. These scams often originate in West African countries.

If you travel to West Africa as a scam victim, you're at risk of:

  • financial loss

This includes travelling to meet a friend or love interest, as well as looking for compensation or revenge.

Common fraud schemes fall into two main categories — commercial and relationship scams.

In commercial scams, criminals ask for details of 'safe' bank accounts to transfer large amounts of money. They may: 

  • promise a percentage of this amount to you
  • send fake cashier cheques for urgent goods shipments
  • request large fees for a fake government contract
  • extort money from you for a bogus business opportunity

In relationship scams, criminals often meet their victims through internet dating sites, chat rooms or social media. Once they've made a connection with you, they may:

  • ask you to send money so they can come to Australia
  • ask you to come to Africa to meet them

Once you transfer money, the relationship often ends. If you travel to Africa to meet the criminals, you may be in danger.

To protect yourself from scams:

  • be wary of online contact from people you don't know
  • don't send money to anyone until you've thoroughly checked details about them

If you suspect a scam, get legal advice.

Don't travel to Ghana to get your money back or to get revenge. You could be in danger.

Cyber security

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you’re connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers, or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions, or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

More information:

Cyber security when travelling overseas

Civil unrest and political tension

Chieftaincy conflicts, land disputes and political tension can lead to localised inter-ethnic violence and civil unrest throughout Ghana, especially in Upper West and Upper East Regions.  

Due to the ongoing chieftaincy conflict in Bawku, there's an increased risk of politically motivated attacks in the Upper West and Upper East Regions. 

There's been an increase in reported incidents of banditry involving passenger buses travelling in the Upper West and Upper East regions resulting in injuries and deaths.  

In July 2023, a passenger bus travelling from Kumasi to Bawku was attacked at a fuel station in Walewale, resulting in several injuries.

Pay attention to your personal safety and surroundings.

Be cautious around large public gatherings like football matches.

Disputes involving local ethnic groups can also turn violent. 

Demonstrations and protests

Public protests and events that draw large groups of people can turn violent. 

When you're in Ghana: 

  • avoid protests, rallies and demonstrations
  • if you encounter a protest or unrest, leave if it's safe to do so
  • monitor the media for reports of unrest, and avoid those areas
  • follow the advice of local authorities

Demonstrations and civil unrest

Terrorism is a threat worldwide. This includes in Ghana.  There's a heightened risk of terrorist attacks in the northern areas of Ghana bordering Côte d’Ivoire, Togo and particularly Burkina Faso, where terrorists, other armed groups and militias are active.

To protect yourself from being involved in a terrorist attack:

  • be alert to possible threats, especially in public places
  • report any suspicious activity or items to police
  • monitor the media for possible threats
  • take official warnings seriously

Criminals increasingly target Westerners, especially women, for violent crime. This includes kidnapping .

If you're in northern Ghana, including the Upper West and Upper East regions, you may be targeted for kidnapping for ransom. You should exercise a high degree of caution in these regions.

To protect yourself from kidnapping:

  • be particularly alert at night
  • vary travel routes and times, particularly your usual running and walking routes

In June 2019, two foreigners were kidnapped in Kumasi.

Climate and natural disasters

Ghana experiences natural disasters and  severe weather , including flooding.

If there's a natural disaster or severe weather:

  • secure your passport in a safe, waterproof location
  • keep in contact friends and family

Register with the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System for alerts.

The wet season is from May to October.

Flooding may happen in the:

  • Northern region
  • Upper East region
  • Upper West region

Roads can shut quickly, stranding travellers.

If you travel during the wet season or after a natural disaster, check if services at your planned destination have been affected.

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive  travel insurance  before you leave.  Your policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are.

If you're not insured, you may have to pay many thousands of dollars up-front for medical care.

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you'll be away.

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. 

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health
  • plan any vaccinations you need.

Do this at least eight weeks before you leave.

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare, or the welfare of another Australian, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor.

If you plan to bring medication, check if it's legal in Ghana. Take enough legal medication for your trip.

Carry a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medication is, including its generic name
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for personal use.

Health risks

Insect-borne diseases.

Yellow fever  is common in Ghana. Yellow fever is a potentially fatal virus spread by mosquitoes. It's prevented by vaccination. Get vaccinated before you travel.

Malaria  and other insect-borne diseases are also common. 

To protect yourself from disease:

  • make sure your accommodation is insect-proof
  • use treated mosquito nets
  • use insect repellent
  • wear long, loose, light-coloured clothes
  • consider taking medicine to prevent malaria

Get medical advice if you have a fever, muscle pain, rash or severe headache.

HIV/AIDS  is common in Ghana. Take precautions if taking part in activities that put you at risk of infection.

Lassa fever

Lassa fever  may be a risk when you have contact with rodents or with food or household items contaminated with rodent droppings.

  • avoid contact with live or dead rodents, burrows or nests and their droppings
  • ensure all foods are well-cooked and covered in rodent-proof containers
  • keep your body, personal belongings, utensils and common contact surfaces (including door knobs and counters) clean
  • avoid places where dust is raised, such as from sweeping and vacuuming rodent droppings
  • avoid contact with infected people, body fluids and infected items

Get immediate medical help if you develop any symptoms of Lassa fever, including a fever, weakness in your body or unexplained pain.

Other health risks

Waterborne, foodborne, parasitic and other infectious diseases are common, including these listed by the World Health Organization:

  • bilharzia (schistosomiasis)
  • meningococcal meningitis
  • tuberculosis

Serious outbreaks sometimes occur.

To protect yourself from illness:

  • drink boiled water or bottled water with sealed lids
  • avoid ice cubes
  • avoid raw and undercooked food, such as salads
  • don't swim in fresh water

Get medical advice if you have a fever or diarrhoea.

Get medical attention straight away if an animal scratches or bites you.

Medical care

Medical facilities in urban areas are basic.

In rural areas, facilities are limited. The standard of care may be less than what you would expect in Australia.

You may need to pay cash upfront before doctors and hospitals will treat you, even in an emergency.

If you're seriously ill or injured, you may need to be moved to a place with better facilities. Medical evacuation can be very expensive.

Local health services may have difficulty responding to outbreaks of infectious disease.

You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.

Penalties for drug offences are severe. This includes mandatory jail terms.

Carrying or using drugs

LGBTI is not formally illegal in Ghana. Same-sex activity is illegal and could lead to prison sentences. LGBTI relationships and identities are interpreted as illegal by society.

Violence, threats, extortion, eviction and arbitrary arrest of LGBTI people occur, and the introduction of an anti-LGBTI bill in 2021 has increased these risks to the LBGTI community. LGBTI travellers should consider travel plans and personal security carefully.

It's also illegal to:

  • carry pornographic material
  • wear military style or camouflage clothes
  • take photos near government buildings or infrastructure, such as oil fields
  • import or export natural resources such as gold, diamonds and precious metals without a licence from the Precious Metals and Mining Commission

More information :

Advice for LGBTI travellers

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

Staying within the law and respecting customs

Dual citizenship

Ghana recognises dual nationality.

Always travel on your Australian passport .

Travelling on your Ghanaian passport may affect your rights and responsibilities, including:

  • civil service
  • military service
  • access to Australian consular services if you're arrested or detained.

Check with the High Commission of Ghana before you travel.

You can get a dual nationality card from the Ghana Ministry of Interior.

Dual nationals

Local customs

Standards of dress and behaviour are conservative.

Check with locals. Take care to not offend.

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Visa conditions

You'll need a visa to travel to Ghana.

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact an embassy or high commission of Ghana for details about visas, currency, customs and quarantine rules.

Border measures

You need to show a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate.  You may need to provide proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 when you arrive. 

Measures are frequently reviewed and may change at short notice. Check the Kotoka International Airport website for details.

Other formalities

Yellow fever vaccination.

You need to carry a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate to enter Ghana. You may be asked to show your certificate when arrive and when you leave by airport officials. See ' Health '.

You may need a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate to travel to other countries after visiting Ghana.

Find out about returning to Australia after exposure to yellow fever (Department of Health).

Countries with a risk of yellow fever

If you'll stay in Ghana for more than 90 days in a year, you must register for a National Identification Authority Non-citizen Ghanacard . You'll need this for ID checks on some transactions.

Some countries won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for six months after you plan to leave that country. This can apply even if you're just transiting or stopping over.

Some foreign governments and airlines apply the rule inconsistently. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

You can end up stranded if your passport is not valid for more than six months.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid for long enough, consider getting a new passport .

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible:

  • In Australia, contact the Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest Australian embassy or consulate .

Passport with ‘X’ gender identifier

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can’t guarantee that a passport showing 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the nearest  embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

  • LGBTI travellers

Money facilities

The local currency is the Ghanaian Cedi (GHS).

Declare all GHS or other currency when you arrive in Ghana. This covers all forms of currency, not only cash.

You can't exchange Australian dollars in Ghana. However, you can easily exchange US dollars and euros for GHS at commercial banks and exchange services.

Larger towns have ATMs. Banks and businesses may not accept credit cards other than Visa.

Credit card fraud is common.

To ensure your access to money:

  • always keep an eye on your credit card, even when you're using it
  • contact your bank to make sure your cards will work

Local travel

Border areas often see higher criminal activity and violence. 

Chieftaincy disputes and political tension can sometimes lead to localized violence and unrest across Ghana.

There have been an increasing number of reported incidents of banditry involving passenger buses travelling in the Upper West and Upper East regions resulting in injuries and deaths. 

In July 2023, a passenger bus travelling from Kumasi to Bawku was attacked at a fuel station in Walewale resulting in several injuries.

There are security risks with using  public transport . See  Safety

Driving permits

You can drive in Ghana for 12 months with:

  • a valid Australian driver's licence
  • an International Driving Permit (IDP)

You must be over 18 years old.

After 12 months, you'll need a local licence.

Australian High Commission in Accra

Road travel

Road safety and driving  in Ghana can be dangerous, due to:

  • poorly maintained roads and vehicles
  • aggressive driving
  • poor street lighting
  • roaming animals
  • pedestrians and cyclists

These risks increase at night and in rural areas.

Police roadblocks are common. You may need to show:

  • identity documents
  • vehicle registration
  • ownership papers

During the wet season, flooding can make roads impassable.

Crowds can quickly gather at the scene of traffic accidents and become aggressive.

To stay safe on the road:

  • understand local traffic laws and practices
  • carry photo ID, vehicle registration and ownership papers
  • be alert to hazards, especially at night
  • get local advice on road conditions, especially during the wet season
  • always keep car windows up, doors locked and valuables out of sight
  • be wary of people who may try to stop your vehicle

If you're in an accident, go to the nearest police station.

Motorcycles

Your travel insurance policy may not cover you for accidents while driving a motorbike or quad bike. Check before you drive.

Always wear a helmet.

Only use registered taxis and limousines. If you can, arrange these through your hotel.

There are security risks with using unregistered taxis and rideshare services.

Take care when travelling alone at night. See Safety

Public transport

Public transport is limited.

Safety and maintenance standards can be unreliable.

There are security risks with using public transport . See Safety

Ferry travel is risky due to generally low safety standards and adverse weather.

There may be too many passengers and not enough life jackets. Always wear a life jacket, even if others don't.

Pirates  operate in the coastal areas of Ghana. Check piracy reports with the International Maritime Bureau .

Travelling by boat

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check Ghana's air safety profile with the Aviation Safety Network.

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

Other numbers for the police are:

  • (0302) 77 36 95
  • (0302) 77 39 06
  • (0302) 78 73 73

Always get a police report when you report a crime.

Your insurer should have a 24-hour emergency number.

Consular contacts

Read the Consular Services Charter for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

Australian High Commission, Accra

2, Second Rangoon Close (cnr Josef Broz Tito Ave) Cantonments Accra, Ghana Phone: (+233) 302 216 400 Fax: (+233) 302 216 410 Email: [email protected] Website: ghana.highcommission.gov.au Facebook: Australian High Commission, Ghana Twitter: @AusAmbGHA

See the High Commission website for details about opening hours and any temporary closures.

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 outside Australia
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

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Places the U.S. Government Warns Not to Travel Right Now

You may want to reconsider traveling to these countries right now.

Do Not Travel to These Countries

Man walking through an airport with his suitcase

(Getty Images)

Crime, civil unrest and terrorism are common risk factors for countries that end up on the State Department's "Do Not Travel" advisory list.

Global conflicts and climate crises , ranging from a series of coups across Africa to earthquakes and floods in catastrophe-prone countries, affected international travel patterns throughout 2023.

Still, international tourist arrivals reached 91% of pre-pandemic levels in the third quarter of 2023, according to estimates by the World Tourism Organization based on travel patterns through September. But some destinations warrant more caution than others. In December alone, about 6 million U.S. citizens left the country for international destinations, 16% higher than the same month in 2019, according to the International Trade Administration . But some destinations warrant more caution than others.

On Oct. 19, following the outbreak of war between Israel and Gaza and flaring tensions in the region, the U.S. State Department issued a worldwide caution advisory due to “increased tensions in various locations around the world, the potential for terrorist attacks, demonstrations or violent actions against U.S. citizens and interests.” Prior to this update, the most recent worldwide caution advisory was issued in 2022 after a U.S. strike killed Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin Laden’s successor as leader of Al Qaeda, causing “a higher potential for anti-American violence.” The worldwide caution advisory remains in effect.

The U.S. State Department also issues individual travel advisory levels for more than 200 countries globally, continually updating them based on a variety of risk indicators such as health, terrorism and civil unrest. Travel advisory levels range from Level 1, which means exercise normal precautions, to Level 4, which means do not travel there.

About 10% of countries – 20 total – have a Level 4: “Do Not Travel” advisory as of Jan. 23. In Level 4 countries, the U.S. government may have “very limited ability” to step in should travelers’ safety or security be at risk, according to the State Department. Crime, civil unrest, kidnapping and terrorism are common risk factors associated with Level 4 countries.

So far in 2024, the State Department made changes to the existing Level 4 advisories for Myanmar, Iran and Gaza, and moved Niger off of the Level 4 list.

Places With a Level 4 Travel Advisory

These are the primary areas the U.S. government says not to travel to right now, in alphabetical order:

Jump to Place: Afghanistan Belarus Burkina Faso Central African Republic Myanmar (formerly Burma) Gaza Haiti Iran Iraq Libya Mali Mexico North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) Russia Somalia South Sudan Sudan Syria Ukraine Venezuela Yemen

Afghanistan: The Central Asian country is wrestling with “terrorism, risk of wrongful detention, kidnapping and crime,” according to the State Department. U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for wrongful detention and kidnapping. In 2022, the government reinstituted public floggings and executions, and women’s rights are disappearing under Taliban control. The U.S. Embassy in Kabul halted operations in August 2021. Since the Taliban took control , many forms of international aid have been halted . Meanwhile, in October 2023, some of the year’s deadliest earthquakes killed more than 2,400 in Afghanistan while the country continues to face a years-long extreme drought.

Belarus: Belarus, which shares a western border with Russia and a southern border with Ukraine, has been flagged for “Belarusian authorities’ continued facilitation of Russia’s war against Ukraine, the buildup of Russian military forces in Belarus, the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, the potential of civil unrest, the risk of detention, and the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Belarus.” The U.S. Embassy in Minsk halted operations in February 2022.

Burkina Faso: Terrorism, crime and kidnapping are plaguing this West African nation. Terrorist attacks may target hotels, restaurants and schools with little to no warning, and the East and Sahel regions of the country are under a state of emergency. In late November hundreds died in clashes between state security forces and rebels near the country’s border with Mali. More than 2 million people in Burkina Faso are displaced due to “violence linked to al-Qaida and the Islamic State group.”

Central African Republic: While there have not been specific incidents of U.S. citizens targeted with violence or crime, violent crime and sudden closure of roads and borders is common. The advisory states that “Embassy Bangui’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, crime, civil unrest, and kidnapping” is a factor in its assessment. Recent data from UNICEF suggests the country has the worst drinking water accessibility of all countries in 2022.

Myanmar (Formerly Burma): Armed conflict and civil unrest are the primary reasons to not travel to this Southeast Asian country, which experienced a military coup in early 2021. Limited health care resources, wrongful detentions and “areas with land mines and unexploded ordnance” are also listed as risk factors. After Ukraine and Israel, Myanmar had the highest conflict-related death toll in 2023.

Gaza : Hamas, a foreign terrorist organization as designated by the State Department, controls much of the Gaza Strip, which shares borders with both Israel and Egypt. On Oct. 7, 2023, Hamas fighters broke across the border into Israel, killing hundreds of civilians and soldiers in a brazen attack that stunned Israelis. On Oct. 10, Israel hit the Gaza Strip with “the fiercest air strikes in its 75-year conflict” according to Reuters . The conflict has since escalated into war between Israel and Hamas, with regular Israeli airstrikes leading to extensive civilian casualties in Gaza. As of mid-December, nearly 85% of Gaza’s population were displaced from their homes, according to UN estimates . The region continues to face shortages of food , water, electricity and medical supplies , with conditions deemed “far beyond a humanitarian crisis.” The State Department warns of terrorism and armed conflict within Gaza’s borders.

Haiti: In July 2023, the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince in response to the increased risk of kidnapping and violent crime in the country , as well as armed conflict between gangs and police. The travel advisory states that cases of kidnapping “often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings.” The travel advisory also states that “U.S. citizens in Haiti should depart Haiti as soon as possible” given “the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.” A series of gang attacks in late September 2023 caused thousands to flee their homes, and many aid groups have been forced to cut or suspend operations amid escalating violence in recent months.

Iran: Terrorism, kidnapping and civil unrest are risk factors for all travelers to Iran, while U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for “arbitrary arrest.” U.S.-Iranian nationals such as students, journalists and business travelers have been arrested on charges of espionage and threatening national security. Executions in Iran rose sharply between 2021 and 2022, bringing the country’s total to nearly 580 people over the year, according to a report by Amnesty International released in May 2023.

Iraq: The State Department cites “terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict [and] civil unrest” as cause for the country’s Level 4 distinction. Iraq’s northern borders, and its border with Syria, are especially dangerous. Since the escalation of conflict in neighboring Israel in October, there has been an increase in attacks against Iraqi military bases, which host U.S. troops and other international forces. On Oct. 20, non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members were ordered to leave the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Lebanon: Sitting on the Mediterranean Sea, Lebanon shares its northern border with Syria and its southern border with Israel, placing it in a region currently wrought with conflict . Following the outbreak of the Israel-Hamas war in early October, family members of U.S. government personnel and non-emergency personnel were authorized to leave the country, and the U.S. State Department raised Lebanon’s travel advisory level from a Level 3 to a Level 4 level due to “the unpredictable security situation related to rocket, missile, and artillery exchanges” between Israel and Hezbollah or other militant groups. On Dec. 19, the U.S. Embassy in Beirut returned to normal staffing and presence, but the country remains at Level 4 due to “crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest, kidnapping, and Embassy Beirut’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.” The country’s borders with Syria and with Israel, as well as refugee settlements within Lebanon, are specifically noted as Level 4 regions.

Libya: Following the end of its dictatorship over a decade ago, Libya has been wrought with internal conflict between armed groups in the East and West. Armed conflict, civil unrest, crime, kidnapping and terrorism are all risk factors. U.S. citizens have been targets of kidnapping for ransom, with terrorists targeting hotels and airports frequented by Westerners. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli halted operations in 2014. In mid-September 2023, floods, which some say were intensified by climate change , killed thousands in eastern Libya. Clashes between armed factions escalated across the country in the latter half of 2023, including in the capital city of Tripoli and in Benghazi.

Mali: After experiencing military coups in 2020 and 2021, crime, terrorism and kidnapping are all prevalent threats in this West African landlocked nation. In July 2022, non-emergency U.S. government employees and their families were ordered to leave the country due to higher risk of terrorist activity. A U.N. report in August 2023 said that military groups in the country, including both Mali security forces and possibly Russian Wagner mercenaries, were spreading terror through the use of violence against women and human rights abuses. Democratic elections were supposed to occur in February 2024, but Mali’s military junta postponed the plans indefinitely. In December, the U.N. officially ended a decade-long peacekeeping presence in the country, which had been among the agency’s deadliest missions, with hundreds of the mission personnel killed since 2013.

Mexico: Each state in Mexico is assessed separately for travel advisory levels. Six of the 32 states in Mexico are designated as Level 4: Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas. Crime and kidnapping are listed as the primary risk factors throughout the country. Nearly 112,000 people were missing across the country as of October, a number the U.N. has called “alarming.”

North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea): U.S. passports are not valid for travel “to, in, or through” this country, home to one of the world's longest-running dynastic dictatorships. The travel advisory states that the Level 4 distinction is due to “the continuing serious risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. nationals.” In July 2023, a U.S. soldier fled across the border into North Korea, where he is believed to be in North Korean custody, the first American detained in the North in nearly five years. He was returned to U.S. custody in September 2023.

Russia: The travel advisory for Russia cites its invasion of Ukraine , harassment of U.S. citizens by Russian government officials and arbitrary law enforcement as a few of the reasons for the Level 4 designation. Chechnya and Mount Elbrus are specifically listed as Level 4 regions. Terrorism, civil unrest, health, kidnapping and wrongful detention are all noted as risks.

Russia Invades Ukraine: A Timeline

TOPSHOT - Black smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv  on February 24, 2022. - Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a military operation in Ukraine today with explosions heard soon after across the country and its foreign minister warning a "full-scale invasion" was underway. (Photo by Aris Messinis / AFP) (Photo by ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images)

Somalia: A severe drought resulting from five failed rainy seasons in a row killed 43,000 people in 2022, and caused a famine amid conflict with Islamist insurgents . Violent crime is common throughout Somalia , pirates frequent its coast off the Horn of Africa, and medical facilities, where they exist, have limited capacity. Crime, terrorism, civil unrest, health and kidnapping are all risk factors. In January 2024, some passengers aboard a U.N.-contracted helicopter were taken hostage by al-Shabaab militants after the vehicle crashed in central Somalia.

South Sudan: Crime, kidnapping and armed conflict are the primary risk factors for South Sudan, which separated from Sudan in 2011, making it the world’s newest country . Weapons are readily available, and travelers have been victims of sexual assault and armed robbery.

Sudan: The U.S. evacuated its embassy in Khartoum in April 2023, and the country closed its airspace due to the ongoing conflict in the country, only permitting humanitarian aid and evacuation efforts. Fighting has escalated in the region between two warring generals seeking to gain control after a military coup in 2021 ousted the country’s prime minister. Civil unrest is the primary risk factor for Africa’s third largest country by area. Crime, terrorism, kidnapping and armed conflict are also noted. The International Criminal Court began investigating alleged war crimes and violence against African ethnic groups in the country in 2023. Millions have fled their homes due to conflict, and the U.N. has said its efforts to provide aid have been hindered by a lack of support, safety and resources. As recently as December 2023, the United Nations warned of catastrophic famine , with millions of children at-risk for malnutrition .

Syria: The advisory states that “No part of Syria is safe from violence,” with terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, armed conflict and risk of unjust detention all potential risk factors. U.S. citizens are often a target for kidnappings and detention. The U.S. Embassy in Damascus halted operations in 2012. Fighting in neighboring Israel has escalated since October, and the conflict has spilled over into Syria, where the U.S. has carried out air strikes following drone and rocket attacks against American troops in Syria and Iraq, triggered by the Israel-Hamas war.

Ukraine: Russian setbacks in their invasion of Ukraine buoyed hopes in Ukraine in 2023. However, Ukraine is a Level 4 country due to Russia’s invasion, with crime and civil unrest also noted as risk factors. The country’s forces shot down two Russian fighter jets on Christmas Eve 2023, in a move Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said “sets the right mood for the entire year ahead.”

Venezuela: Human rights abuses and lack of health care plague this South American nation, which has been in a political crisis since 2014. In 2019, diplomatic personnel were withdrawn from the U.S. Embassy in Caracas. Threats in the country include crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, wrongful detention and poor health infrastructure.

Yemen: Six of the nine risk factors defined by the State Department – terrorism, civil unrest, health risks, kidnapping, armed conflict and landmines – are all present in Yemen. Despite private companies offering tourist visits to the Yemeni island of Socotra, the U.S. government argues those arranging such visits “are putting tourists in danger.” Civil war and cholera are also both present throughout the country. The U.S. Embassy in Sanaa halted operations in 2015. The country has experienced a relative lull in the civil war fighting, but as peace negotiations have gotten traction, flare ups in the fighting have jeopardized progress. Most recently, the U.S. and U.K. have carried out a series of airstrikes in the country, targeting Iran-backed Houthi sites.

Other Countries to Watch

Since Jan. 1, the State Department has updated travel advisories for 12 different countries as well as for the West Bank and Gaza, adding information about specific regions or risk factors, or simply renewing an existing advisory. Travel advisory levels can change based on several factors in a nation, such as increased civil unrest, policies that affect human rights or higher risks of unlawful detention.

The State Department has given about 25 countries an assessment of Level 3, meaning it recommends people “reconsider travel” to those destinations.

On Oct. 14, one week after the deadly Hamas attack on Israel, Israel and the West Bank were both moved from Level 2 to Level 3, while Gaza remains at Level 4. The region’s travel advisory was updated again in November to reflect travel restrictions for certain government employees who have not already left the area, and it was updated again on Jan. 3.

China became a Level 3 country in late 2020, with an update in December 2022 citing “the surge in COVID-19 cases, arbitrary enforcement of local laws, and COVID-19-related restrictions” as the reason for the advisory. In June 2023, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) was moved from the Level 3 to the Level 2 list, but travelers are still advised to be cautious in the area due to “arbitrary enforcement of local laws.” Meanwhile, Macau remains at Level 3.

Following an attempted coup in August 2023, Niger was elevated to Level 4 in August and the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Niamey. In early January 2024, the overall risk level for the country was lowered back to Level 3. Despite the new classification, the State Department still asks non-emergency government personnel and eligible family members to depart the country.

In mid-December 2023 there was an explosion at Guinea’s main fuel depot which has since affected access to health care and basic goods and services. The country was subsequently designated a Level 3 nation after having previously been Level 2. Concerns about civil unrest, health, crime and fuel shortages impacting local infrastructure were listed as the primary risk factors contributing to the change.

Several Level 3 countries are among the worst countries for human trafficking, as designated by the State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report . Level 3 countries on this list include Papua New Guinea, Guinea Bissau, China and Chad. There are also nine Level 4 countries designated as among the worst for human trafficking: Afghanistan, Belarus, Iran, Myanmar, North Korea, Russia, Syria, South Sudan and Venezuela.

Over 70 countries are currently at Level 2, meaning the State Department recommends travelers “exercise increased caution” when traveling to those destinations.

Sweden is designated a Level 2 country, with terrorism noted as the primary risk factor in the country. France, which saw nationwide protests throughout 2023, has civil unrest and terrorism noted as risk factors for its Level 2 status.

In September 2023, Gabon was added to the Level 2 list for civil unrest after having been Level 1. The month prior, a coup in Gabon ousted President Ali Bongo Ondimba, who had been in power since 2009, just minutes after it was announced he had been elected for another term. Within the week, the military junta swore in Gen. Brice Clotaire Oligui Nguema – the former leader’s cousin and head of the republican guard – as the country’s head of state. The African Union suspended the country’s membership shortly after the coup. The cities of Libreville and Port Gentil are specifically noted for risk of crime, and some areas have a nighttime curfew in effect.

Bangladesh 's Level 2 travel advisory was updated in October 2023 to add a note about the country’s upcoming general election Jan. 7, 2024. The advisory states “demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.”

In November, several Level 2 travel advisories were updated with new cautionary information. The advisory for Ghana was updated in November 2023 to reflect threats against LGBTQI+ travelers specifically, noting “anti-LGBTQI+ rhetoric and violence have increased in recent years.” Meanwhile, the advisory for South Africa now notes that routes recommended by GPS may be unsafe with higher risk for crime.

Turkmenistan was moved off of the Level 2 list to become the newest addition to the Level 1 list on Jan. 22, meaning normal precautions are recommended but there are no risk factors causing travelers to practice increased caution.

The State Department asks travelers to pay attention to travel advisory levels and alerts , review country information pages for their destinations and read related country security reports before going abroad.

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Ghanaian Flag

Last verified: Monday, 29. January 2024 at 07:30 AM

Ghana Travel Advisory

  • Western Africa
  • Ghana Travel Advice

We advise caution when travelling to Ghana

Local situation: 3.4 / 5.

We advise caution when travelling to Ghana. We detected travel advisories from 5 sources for this specific country.

Regional Situation: 3.3 / 5

Ghana shares a land border with 3 neighbouring states. For this region of countries (including Ghana), the Advisory Index is 3.3 (average value over all countries). All countries have some reported advisories: Burkina Faso (4.1), Ivory Coast with 3.3 and Togo with 2.3 (of 5).

Current informationen on Covid-19 in Ghana

There are currently no officially reported cases of infections with SARS-CoV-2 (or Coronavirus) in Ghana. As reported by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control this morning (~8:30am CET).

There are currently no officially reported deaths related to this disease in Ghana.

Source: www.ecdc.europa.eu

Advice scoring history for Ghana

Chart of the risk level over that last 200 days. This is the daily calculated travel risk for Ghana.

Chart of the number of sources over that last 200 days. This is the daily number of advisory sources (of any rating) that have been active on that day.

Note: Changes happening on the 28th/29th of July 2019 are related to a change in the software and number of sources processed.

Rating Details (single travel warnings)

These are the individual advisories published by other countries about the destination Ghana from a travellers perspective. The scoring of all messages combined is the foundation for the current rating 3.4 out of 5.0 .

Warning Level Icon

This is the general advisory usually covering the country as a whole.

Advisory issued by: New Zealand

Flag of New Zealand

Exercise increased caution in Ghana due to crime (level 2 of 4).

Source: https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/ghana

Advisory issued by: United States

Flag of United States

Updated to reflect threats against LGBTQI+ travelers. Exercise increased caution in Ghana due to crime and violence against members of the LGBTQI+ community. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. Exercise increased caution in: Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East regions due to civil unrest. Country ...

Source: http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/ghana-travel-advisory.html

Warning Level Icon

Advisory issued by: Canada

Flag of Canada

The Canadian goverment suggests: Exercise a high degree of caution.

Source: https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/ghana

Individual rating changes for Ghana

This is the recent history of individual changes of travel advices that affected the total asessment of Ghana. Most recent events first.

Changes from August 7th 2020

The total rating for Ghana changed from 3.6 to 4.2 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of United States

The United States government increased their existing warning for Ghana to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 1.0 (by +3.0).

Changes from March 22nd 2020

The total rating for Ghana changed from 3.4 to 3.6 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Canada

The Canadian government increased their existing warning for Ghana to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 3.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from March 18th 2020

The total rating for Ghana changed from 3.0 to 3.4 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Australia

The Australian government increased their existing warning for Ghana to 5.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 4.0 (by +1.0).

Flag of Ireland

The Irish government increased their existing warning for Ghana to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 3.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from March 16th 2020

The total rating for Ghana changed from 2.8 to 3.0 . Here are the influencing details:

The Australian government issued a new warning for Ghana with a rating of 4.0.

Changes from March 14th 2020

The total rating for Ghana changed from 2.5 to 2.8 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Denmark

The Danish government increased their existing warning for Ghana to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 3.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from September 25th 2019

The total rating for Ghana changed from 0.0 to 0.0 . Here are the influencing details:

The United States government issued a new warning for Ghana with a rating of 1.0.

The Canadian government issued a new warning for Ghana with a rating of 3.0.

The Irish government issued a new warning for Ghana with a rating of 3.0.

The Danish government issued a new warning for Ghana with a rating of 3.0.

About Ghana

Ghana with its capital Accra is a country in Africa (Western Africa), slightly smaller than Oregon (239,460 km²). The country is located Western Africa, bordering the Gulf of Guinea, between Cote d'Ivoire and Togo. The climate can be described as tropical; warm and comparatively dry along southeast coast; hot and humid in southwest; hot and dry in north. The landscape is mostly low plains with dissected plateau in south-central area. With a population of about 23.38 million citizens.

Ghanaian flag

Flag of Ghana

Introduction Video

Basic Statistics and Facts

Environmental problems and natural hazzards.

These are problems Ghana is facing. Environmental issues refer to damages of the nature due to industry and society. Natural hazzards refer to potential dangers originating in nature.

Environmental problems

  • deforestation
  • inadequate supplies of potable water
  • overgrazing
  • poaching and habitat destruction threatens wildlife populations
  • recurrent drought in north severely affects agricultural activities
  • soil erosion
  • water pollution

Natural hazzards

  • dry, dusty, northeastern harmattan winds from January to March

Top Industries and Agricultural Products

These are the main product industries and agricultural products of Ghana. This list indicates what this country is good at producing.

  • aluminum smelting
  • food processing
  • light manufacturing
  • small commercial ship building

Agriculture products

Ghanaian Imports and Exports

These are the main product categories of imports and exports to and from Ghana.

Export products

  • horticultural products
  • manganese ore

Import products

  • capital equipment
  • refined petroleum

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the current travel advisory for ghana.

Ghana is currently rated at 3,4 out of a possible 5.0. Collected from 5 official sources. We advise caution when travelling to Ghana.

Is it safe to travel Ghana in 2024?

Visiting the country Ghana is usually fine. The score is at 3,4 Just keep an eye open, obey local rules and you'll most likely be fine.

How many travel advisories do you know for Ghana?

We currently evaluate 11 official sources each morning. Today, we know of active advisories from 5 individual sources for Ghana.

What is the current Corona virus situation in Ghana?

There are currently no officially reported cases of infections with SARS-CoV-2 (or Coronavirus) in Ghana. As reported by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control this morning (~8:30am CET). There are currently no officially reported deaths related to this disease in Ghana.

What is the size of Ghana?

Ghana has a size of 239,460 km² or 92,456 mi² which is slightly smaller than Oregon.

Common Frequently Asked Questions

For non-country specific questions, please check our global F.A.Q.

Travel safety map for Ghana and bordering countries.

Risk level icon

If you want to embed Ghana travel warning information into your website or application, check out these tools.

  • Is Ghana safe to travel?
  • What's the safety situation in Ghana?
  • Are there security warnings for Ghana?

Guernsey Flag

2020-03-10: Integrated data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (COVID-19/ SARS-CoV-2/ Coronavirus).

2019-09-01: Added timeline charts for risk level and number of advisories.

2019-07-29: Added two more sources (Finland and Denmark). Affects country ratings.

2019-07-15: South-Sudan was missing and was added today.

2019-05-18: Performance improvements for API users.

2019-03-23: Introduced professional API with more data.

2019-02-13: Added three more sources (Cyprus, Ireland and Malta). Affects country ratings.

Travel Advice for Ghana

Going to Ghana and need to know about the latest government travel advice for Ghana? Find the updated travel advice and travel warnings for Ghana from governments around the world, here.

General Travel Advice and Warnings for Ghana

The decision to take a trip to Ghana is your decision and you are accountable for your personal safety whilst in Ghana.

The web content on this page is given information only and collected from travel advice and warnings for Ghana by authorities all over the world to their citizens.

While we make every effort to provide you most recent travel advice details, it is given on an “as is” basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied.

This operators of this website does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information offered.

Standard Cautions You Need to Bear In Mind Whilst Taking a Trip in Ghana

Crime – Petty criminal activities such as pick pocketing in a jampacked environment to sexual assault and muggings do take place in larger cities of Ghana. Ensure that all your personal possessions, such as passports and other traveling documents, are safe at all times.

Terrorism – Always be aware of your surroundings whenever in public locations. Be particularly vigilant if going to sporting occasions and throughout religious holidays and other public occasions, as terrorists frequently make use of such events to mount attacks.

Demonstrations and Protests – Demonstrations might occur. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent any time. They can also result in disruptions to traffic and public transportation. It is in your interest of safety to stay away from locations where demonstrations and large gatherings are occurring and follow the instructions of local authorities. Monitor local media in Ghana for information on on-going demonstrations in Ghana.

Scams – Exercise care in crowded tourist areas in Ghana, where scammers target foreigners. If you’ve been scammed in Ghana, get to a safe area right away; make note, as soon as possible of the name and address of the facility where you were held; alert the authorities in Ghana and get a report and if your credit card is used by the scammer call your credit card provider to report the scam; they will likely ask for a copy of the police report to cancel the financial transaction.

Spiked Food and Drinks – Never ever leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of complete strangers when taking a trip in Ghana or anywhere else. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from unknown acquaintances. These items might have drugs that can put you at risk of sexual assault and mugging.

travel warning ghana

What is the entry/exit conditions for Ghana?

Every nation or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders, in the same manner Ghana chooses who enter its borders. The Government of your home country cannot step in on your behalf if you do not satisfy your Ghana’s entry or exit requirements.

For more information regarding the entry/exit requirement for Ghana go to visa requirements for Ghana or get the current info with the visa office at the Ghanaian embassy in your home country.

Travel insurance coverage for Ghana

Travel health cover is one of the primary factors travellers get travel insurance. It will not stop you getting ill or injured, though it can stop you being affected financially. Medical aid overseas can be really expensive.

You must shell out for all healthcare you receive overseas. You can not expect to get free or subsidised treatment through your Ghana’s public health system, like you would in your home country.

If you can not pay, local authorities can detain you. The government from your home country can’t pay you medical costs for you, loan you money or get you out of jail.

You need travel insurance coverage for travelling to Ghana . You also need to ensure you select a plan that is right for you.

Read through the fine print of your travel insurance policy.

Declare all pre-existing conditions to your travel insurance provider upfront. If you don’t, you may void your travel insurance policy.

Inform your travel insurance company the activities you plan to do, prior to you go. Many common activities like skiing are left out in basic plans. You may need to pay added.

Check if you have free credit card travel insurance coverage. Some cards include travel insurance coverage cover. Nevertheless, they typically have different conditions than paid plans. Understand the differences.

If you’re visiting Ghana from a country that has a reciprocal healthcare arrangement, you still need travel medical insurance. Agreements are limited in what they’ll will cover.

If you have an incurable ailment, you may not be able to obtain standard travel insurance policy. Nevertheless you might be able to get a specialised insurance provider that covers you for health, accidents or property troubles unconnected to your illness. Speak with your insurer to find out.

Learn more about getting global travel insurance coverage for Ghana before you go.

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Travel advice and advisories by destination

COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

The Government of Canada’s official source of travel information and advice, the Travel Advice and Advisories help you to make informed decisions and travel safely while you are outside Canada. Check the page for your destination often, because safety and security conditions may change. See Travel Advice and Advisories – FAQ for more information.

Where are you going?

Take normal security precautions

Exercise a high degree of caution

Avoid non-essential travel

Avoid all travel

Travel advice from other countries

Travel advice is also provided by the governments of Australia , New Zealand , the United Kingdom and the United States .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

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Tips on Ghana Warnings and Dangers – Stay Safe!

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Ghana Warnings and Dangers

Stay safe in Ghana by following these tips.

Early explorers and missionaries, including the Great Egyptologist, Belzoni, often died of health problems soon after arrival in Ghana. Today, the biggest threat remains malaria, an illness spread by mosquitoes.

Authorities may prescribe some prophylatics for a month before, during, and for a month after the trip. Prophylatics for malaria are not a vaccine but act to combat reproduction of malaria cysts in the blood.

Here are some steps to avoid malaria: First, use a DEET clothes wash kit to treat a set of clothes before leaving home. Second, use a 50 percent DEET lotion to stop mosquitoes from landing on the skin. Third, wear long sleeves and pants, especially at night. Fourth, and most importantly, since being bitten at night during sleep is very common, stay in hotels with air-conditioning. If the traveler is on a very tight budget, or if no a/c is available, a good fan near the bed can help, but then sleep in a mosquito net. Fifth, avoid spending time about the open sewers common in the cities.

Open Sewer System

The sewer system is on the side of the roads in Accra. Some have concrete blocks covering them and some have metal grates. Whether they are covered or not, they are still in disrepair. You must watch where you walk, especially at night. You could easily twist your ankle. Ask at your hotel if it’s safe to venture outside without a driver or guide at night.

Editor’s Note: The information contained on this page was compiled using real traveler reviews about warnings and dangers in Ghana.

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Ghana to initiate visa-free travel for Africans in 2024

Ghana has announced plans to implement a policy enabling visa-free entry for all African visitors to the country by the close of 2024.

Akufo-Addo

  • The government announced its commitment to ensuring visa-free for all Africans travelling into our country.

Countries across Africa are realizing the importance of dismantling barriers that have long hindered intra-continental interactions.

Currently, only five African countries provide visa-free entry for all African citizens.

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President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo officially announced this during the 2024 Africa Prosperity Dialogue in Ghana.

Akufo-Addo stressed the importance of such policies continent-wide, promoting the free movement of people, goods, and services to reap the benefits of enhanced trade to achieve the goal of economic transformation in Africa.

What President Akufo-Addo said:

“Many of you had to acquire a visa to come to this event, we made a special arrangement for this conference, we reduced the visa acquisition fee by 50%, and we were thus able to receive your visa on arrival,”

“The government of Ghana is committed to ensuring visa-free for all Africans travelling into our country, and the process has begun to get the policy implemented this year,”

From the removal of troublesome trade tariffs within sub-regions to the elimination of visa restrictions entirely, the continent is on a fast progressive path.

Last November, Ghana and South Africa unveiled a visa-waiver scheme, granting citizens the freedom to travel between the two countries visa free.

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World Bank to Provide $300 million to Ghana to Strengthen Macroeconomic Stability and Support Resilient Economic Growth

WASHINGTON, January 23, 2024 – The World Bank today approved a $300 million Development Policy Operation for Ghana. The First Resilient Recovery Development Policy Financing is a critical contribution by the Bank’s International Development Association* (IDA) to help Ghana’s economic recovery and support the country’s resilient and inclusive growth.

“The Government of Ghana remains committed to restoring macroeconomic stability and to the implementation of lasting reforms to set the economy on a path of strong long-term sustainable growth and transformation. The disbursement of this $300 million Development Policy Financing, the first in a series of three, will play a vital role in easing Ghana’s fiscal constraints, sustaining the momentum of economic recovery while protecting the poor and vulnerable,” said Honnorable Ken Ofori-Atta, Minister of Finance for Ghana.

The approval of this financing package follows last week’s agreement in principle by the Official Creditors’ Committee under the G20 Common Framework on the key parameters of the proposed debt restructuring for Ghana. The agreement, which is consistent with the Joint World Bank-International Monetary Fund Debt Sustainability Framework, represents a critical milestone toward restoring debt sustainability.

“Restoring fiscal and debt sustainability, bolstering growth prospects, curbing inflation, and protecting the most vulnerable – measures supported by this financing – are urgent priorities for Ghana. They are also essential steps to allow the country to attract more foreign investment, revitalize its domestic private sector, build resilience against climate change, and improve the quality of life of its people,” said Ousmane Diagana, World Bank Vice President for Western and Central Africa.

The Resilient Recovery Development Policy Operation is the first in a series of three operations of $300 million each and part of a broad World Bank engagement for crisis response and resilience in Ghana. Its objectives are to: 1) restore fiscal sustainability; 2) support financial sector stability and private sector development; 3) improve energy sector financial discipline; and 4) strengthen social and climate resilience.

Specific reforms supported by this financing series include strengthening domestic revenue mobilization, controlling expenditures, safeguarding financial sector stability, removing barriers to private investment, setting the energy sector on a sounder financial and operational footing, strengthening the country’s social protection system, and mainstreaming climate adaptation and mitigation across policies.

*The World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA), established in 1960, helps the world’s poorest countries by providing grants and low to zero-interest loans for projects and programs that boost economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve poor people’s lives. IDA is one of the largest sources of assistance for the world’s 74 poorest countries, 39 of which are in Africa. Resources from IDA bring positive change to the 1.3 billion people who live in IDA countries. Since 1960, IDA has provided $458 billion to 114 countries. Annual commitments have averaged about $29 billion over the last three years (FY19-FY21), with about 70 percent going to Africa. Learn more online: IDA.worldbank.org. #IDAworks

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United States of America, Department of State

U.S. Embassy in Ghana

Social / search – en, travel advisory: reconsider travel to ghana due to covid-19.

The Department of State renewed its Travel Advisory for Ghana on February 16, 2021. The advisory can be found  here  and is also copied below for your convenience:

Reconsider travel to Ghana due to  COVID-19 .

Read the Department of State’s  COVID-19 page  before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Ghana due to COVID-19.

Ghana currently allows air transportation, and businesses are operating. Visit the  Embassy’s COVID-19 page  for more information on COVID-19 in Ghana.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Urban areas due to  crime .
  • Intercity highways after dark due to  crime.
  • Areas near the northern border in the Upper East and Upper West regions due to  crime.
  • Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East regions due to  civil unrest.

Read the  country information page .

If you decide to travel to Ghana:

  • See the  U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19 .
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on  Travel and COVID-19 .
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Crime and Safety Report  for Ghana.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

Urban Areas – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime, such as street mugging, is more frequent in urban areas as compared to their surrounding suburbs. These crimes are also more prevalent at night and in isolated locations.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to more serious crimes.

Intercity Highways After Dark – Exercise Increased Caution

Armed assaults on private vehicles and public transports occur more frequently after dark, often by criminal elements using blockades to slow down and restrict movement of vehicles.

Areas Near the Northern Border in the Upper East and Upper West Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

U.S. citizens traveling in Ghana should exercise caution while visiting border areas, in particular the northern border, and be sure to stay abreast of any regional Travel Advisory updates or Security Alerts affecting those areas.

Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

Civil unrest due to tribal disputes can occur at any time.  While such disputes are typically non-violent, the likelihood for violence developing from a tribal dispute is greater in parts of these regions.

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

Last Update: Reissued with updates to Ghana air transportation and business operations information.

  • Follow us on  Facebook  and  Twitter
  • [email protected]
  • U.S. Embassy Ghana Website
  • Country Information Page for Ghana
  • 888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

By U.S. Embassy in Ghana | 24 February, 2021 | Topics: Alert

Great Seal of the United States

Ghana – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Demonstration alert: u.s. embassy accra, ghana.

Footer Disclaimer This is the official website of the U.S. Embassy in Ghana. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

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Foreign Office gives warning to Worthing man running length of Africa

  • Published 4 days ago

Russell Cook running in Africa

A man running the length of Africa has been advised to avoid travelling through Algeria by the UK Foreign Office over safety concerns.

Russell Cook, from Worthing, West Sussex, had originally planned to complete 360 marathons in 240 days.

After visa complications, the 26-year-old said the challenge could be in doubt .

The government warned terrorists were "likely" to try to carry out attacks in Algeria, including kidnappings.

The extreme challenge began at South Africa's most southerly point on 22 April and is due to finish at Tunisia's most northerly point.

Mr Cook, nicknamed "Hardest Geezer", had originally aimed to run 9,320 miles (14,500km), crossing 16 borders, but extended the challenge due to complications with his visas, health scares, geopolitical issues and an armed robbery .

He is on day 279 of the challenge.

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The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) said it had provided Mr Cook with travel advice.

"It clearly sets out the risks involved travelling through these dangerous areas, to where we clearly advise against all travel," a spokesman said.

"Our travel advice is just that, advice, and it is up to individuals to decide whether to follow it. Visa applications are a matter for the issuing country."

Russell Cook running in Africa

Mr Cook previously said the challenge could be in doubt if he could not secure permission to cross the border into Algeria from Mauritania.

"I've been on the road for 278 days, ran 12,000km (7,456 miles) across 13 different countries, raised over £140,000 for charity - but it is all hanging in the balance," he said.

MP Alexander Stafford, chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Algeria, has written to the Algerian Ambassador to the UK asking him to help grant a visa to Mr Cook.

In a letter to Nourredine Yazid , he said: "I know that you, the government of Algeria, will not want to see Russ fail at this final hurdle, and I hope that this letter might help expediate his application.

"Russ' journey is truly inspirational to us all."

Tim Loughton, the Conservative MP for East Worthing, has also publicly offered his help and support.

The challenge is in aid of The Running Charity and has raised £144,492 so far.

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Related Topics

  • Marathon running
  • Fundraising

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The Running Charity

IMAGES

  1. Visit Ghana

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  2. Is Ghana Safe For Tourists? All Your Most Pressing Questions Answered!

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  3. Travel Restrictions in Africa (Can You Still Come to Ghana?) Ghana

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  4. 10 Tips before you travel to Ghana

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  5. Traveling to Ghana During Pandemic (International Travel Tips) Arriving

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  6. Transport in Ghana: Tips for Traveling Around Safely

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COMMENTS

  1. Ghana Travel Advisory

    Ghana - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution. Updated to reflect threats against LGBTQI+ travelers. Exercise increased caution in Ghana due to crime and violence against members of the LGBTQI+ community. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East ...

  2. Message for U.S. Citizens: Update to Ghana Travel Advisory

    Read the Department of State's COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Ghana due to COVID-19. While the country's land, air, and sea borders remain closed, Ghana has lifted stay at home orders and resumed many internal ...

  3. Ghana

    For information traffic safety and road conditions in Ghana, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Ghana. Hide. ... Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State. Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Leave a copy of your itinerary ...

  4. Visit Ghana

    ghana tourism authority - head office. p. o. box gp 3106, accra, ghana. +233 307007100

  5. Ghana International Travel Information

    Due to safety concerns, Ghana Civil Aviation Authority prohibits transporting via air carrier any Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phone device. Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Ghana should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website, and the NGA broadcast warnings.

  6. New Travel Guidelines

    GHANA TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS. Individuals traveling to Ghana are required to strictly adhere to the following new directives as stated by Ghana's President during his 16 th address to the Nation on Measures Taken Against the Spread of the Coronavirus:. All passengers arriving in Ghana must be in possession of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from an accredited laboratory in the country of ...

  7. Alerts and Messages

    Visit the State Department's Office of American Citizens Services and Crisis Management website for: all Travel Advisories and Country-Specific Information. This is the official website of the U.S. Embassy in Ghana. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

  8. Health Alert: COVID-19 and Yellow Fever. U. S. Embassy Accra, Ghana

    Assistance: U.S. Embassy Accra, Ghana. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Email: [email protected]. U.S. Embassy Ghana Website. Country Information Page for Ghana. State Department - Consular Affairs. 888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444. Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

  9. Ghana travel advice

    Around 90,000 British nationals visit Ghana every year. While most visits are trouble-free, crime does occur. In recent years, reported crime has increased, particularly over the Christmas period ...

  10. Ghana's Covid restrictions: Unvaccinated must get jabs on arrival

    Ghana is introducing some of the world's strictest Covid travel rules, by banning any adult who has not been vaccinated from flying in with effect from Monday. There is no option to self-isolate ...

  11. Ghana Travel Restrictions

    Ghana entry details and exceptions. Entry restrictions do not apply to fully vaccinated travelers, travelers under the age of 18, citizens and residents of Ghana. Temperature screening is required for all passengers on arrival.

  12. Traveling to Ghana during Covid-19: What you need to know before ...

    Entry requirements. Non-resident travelers aged 18 years and over must be fully vaccinated in order to enter. They no longer need to undergo any Covid-19 testing. Ghanaians and resident foreigners ...

  13. Travel advice and advisories for Ghana

    Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country's entry rules. Regular Canadian passport. Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the date you expect to leave Ghana. Passport for official travel. Different entry rules ...

  14. Travel Advisories

    Ghana Travel Advisory: Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution: November 20, 2023: Democratic Republic of the Congo Travel Advisory : Level 3: Reconsider Travel: ... TRAVEL ADVISORIES AND ALERTS: THE DETAILS Enroll in STEP. Subscribe to get up-to-date safety and security information and help us reach you in an emergency abroad.

  15. Ghana Travel Advice & Safety

    Latest update: We've reviewed our travel advice for Ghana and continue to advise, exercise a high degree of caution. Higher levels apply in some areas. There's been an increase in reported incidents of banditry involving passenger buses travelling in the Upper West and Upper East regions resulting in injuries and deaths (see 'Safety').

  16. Places the U.S. Government Warns Not to Travel Right Now

    Places With a Level 4 Travel Advisory. These are the primary areas the U.S. government says not to travel to right now, in alphabetical order: Jump to Place: Afghanistan: The Central Asian country ...

  17. Ghana Travel Advisory

    Rating Details (single travel warnings) These are the individual advisories published by other countries about the destination Ghana from a travellers perspective. The scoring of all messages combined is the foundation for the current rating 3.4 out of 5.0. Danger level: 2 - Travel is usually safe. This is the general advisory usually covering ...

  18. Travel Advice for Ghana

    General Travel Advice and Warnings for Ghana. The decision to take a trip to Ghana is your decision and you are accountable for your personal safety whilst in Ghana. The web content on this page is given information only and collected from travel advice and warnings for Ghana by authorities all over the world to their citizens.

  19. Travel advice and advisories

    Travel advice and advisories by destination. The Government of Canada's official source of travel information and advice, the Travel Advice and Advisories help you to make informed decisions and travel safely while you are outside Canada. ... Ghana: Exercise a high degree of caution. 2024-01-09 09:21:33: gibraltar Gibraltar: Take normal ...

  20. Tips on Ghana Warnings and Dangers

    Ghana Warnings and Dangers. Stay safe in Ghana by following these tips. Malaria. Early explorers and missionaries, including the Great Egyptologist, Belzoni, often died of health problems soon ...

  21. Ghana to initiate visa-free travel for Africans in 2024

    January 26, 2024 2:00 PM. Ghana has announced plans to implement a policy enabling visa-free entry for all African visitors to the country by the close of 2024. Akufo-Addo. The government announced its commitment to ensuring visa-free for all Africans travelling into our country. Countries across Africa are realizing the importance of ...

  22. Health Alert: COVID-19 U. S. Embassy Accra, Ghana

    The Ghana Health Service has consistently reported an increase in the average daily new COVID-19 cases and percent positivity in the three weeks prior to June 16, 2022. From June 10-16, 2022, the average daily number of new cases is 216 cases per day, and the average percent positivity is 21.9%. From May 27-June 2, 2022, these indicators were ...

  23. Message for U.S. Citizens: New Vaccine Requirement for Travel to Ghana

    U.S. Embassy Accra, Ghana. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Email: [email protected]. U.S. Embassy Ghana Website. Country Information Page for Ghana. State Department - Consular Affairs. 888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444. Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

  24. World Bank to Provide $300 million to Ghana to Strengthen Macroeconomic

    WASHINGTON, January 23, 2024 - The World Bank today approved a $300 million Development Policy Operation for Ghana. The First Resilient Recovery Development Policy Financing is a critical contribution by the Bank's International Development Association* (IDA) to help Ghana's economic recovery and support the country's resilient and inclusive growth.

  25. Travel Advisory: Reconsider travel to Ghana due to COVID-19

    The Department of State renewed its Travel Advisory for Ghana on February 16, 2021. The advisory can be found here and is also copied below for your convenience: Reconsider travel to Ghana due to COVID-19. Read the Department of State's COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for ...

  26. Foreign Office gives warning to Worthing man running length of Africa

    A man running the length of Africa has been advised to avoid travelling through Algeria by the UK Foreign Office over safety concerns. Russell Cook, from Worthing, West Sussex, had originally ...