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torngat mountains trip

Getting to The Torngats requires some planning and preparation. Each leg of the journey is part and parcel of your Arctic adventure experience! You can choose to begin your travel by air or road. And no matter where your journey begins, we’re here to respond to any questions or concerns, and to make the process as smooth and easy as possible.

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Bucket list guide: Torngat Mountains National Park

Torngat Mountains National Park

Things to do

The Canadian Rockies? Check. The Arctic? Check. But what about Torngat Mountains National Park External Link Title ? If you haven't crossed this epic destination off your bucket list, it's time to plan a trip. This dramatic, otherworldly landscape of sweeping peaks and valleys in Newfoundland and Labrador named for the Inuktitut "Tongait" or "place of the spirits" is remote with a capital R, which is why most travellers never make it there. Here's why you should.

What all the fuss is about

A post shared by Exiled (@_exiled) External Link Title on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:25am PST

It’s hard to describe the Torngats without gushing. It’s simply superlative. It’s a place of unusual geology created by some of the world’s oldest rocks. Towering glacier-carved mountains in hues of peach, green, and gray rise up dramatically from river-cut valleys and fjords far below like a cinematographer’s flipside take on Mordor. The place feels brooding, uplifting, and spiritual at the same time. Not surprisingly, it was once the stomping grounds of Inuit shamans. A visit means experiencing nature at her most unspoiled. Go for solitude, rugged adventure, to meet the Indigenous Peoples who live there, and to see creatures like polar bears, whales, and caribou in their pristine natural environment.

How to get there

A post shared by Newfoundland Labrador Tourism (@newfoundlandlabrador) External Link Title on Sep 18, 2017 at 12:30pm PDT

The Torngat Mountains are remote and there are no roads -- that's the draw. The park is 9,700 square kilometres of wilderness on untamed northern Labrador's Atlantic coast. It's a long journey because you have to fly through Labrador External Link Title , either Goose Bay or Nain, from St. John's , Newfoundland or Montreal , Quebec. From there, it's a charter flight External Link Title , then a 40-minute boat ride to the park's base camp. It's just all part of the experience.

On your way in, stop in rowdy St. John's and an outport fishing community to get to know "the Rock," a poetic landscape that's unpretentious and authentically captivating along with the irreverent, musical, and proudly salt-of-the-Earth folks. The guys at CapeRace Adventures External Link Title can connect you with friendly neighbours and a kitchen party or two.

When to go and what to pack

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July and August are the time for adventure in the Torngats. But be prepared for weather delays and be sure to bring the right gear External Link Title . That is, you'll want to pack rain wear, sturdy hiking boots, warm outdoor clothing, and a cold-weather insulated sleeping bag -- and, as the operators say, bring along "flexibility and a hefty sense of humor."

Where to stay

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Options vary widely from do-it-yourself roughing it, to luxe heated accommodations provided by high-end operators. For example, wild camp on your own (there are no permanent campgrounds) and charter your own flight in, or hire an outfitter to set it all up and take you heli-hiking External Link Title . Perhaps the most authentic, unusual experience, though, is the Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station External Link Title . Open late July to late August, it's a seasonal solar-powered tent camp and lab just outside the park's southern edge on Saglek Fjord, in addition to some remote fly-in locations for research projects. There's no Internet, but there is running water, plus showers and flush toilets, and all meals are provided. Guests can stay alongside researchers. And those that do rave about the experience.

Top things to do

A post shared by The Torngats (@thetorngatmountains) External Link Title on May 20, 2016 at 5:50am PDT
  • Go to base camp : Only a dozen or so intrepid adventurers visit the Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station each year. That, and the spectacular location, make the experience incomparable. This is a spot where scientists embark on all kinds of research, from anthropology and physics, to climatology and oceanography, with guests alongside. Embark on hardcore hiking and scouting expeditions via the crew's Zodiacs and helicopters, with a skilled Inuit bear guard who's always in tow.
  • Meet the Inuit : At base camp, you get to hang out with Nunatsiavut and Nunavik elders and youth. Learn how they catch and fillet Arctic char in a matter of seconds, smoke it ("pitsik"), and whip up a traditional dessert of char eggs and seal oil with foraged berries. Watch Inuit throat singing, learn Inuktitut, and watch traditional Inuit games.
  • Explore : If you're on your own, Parks Canada offers itineraries External Link Title and outings almost daily in the summer. Go wildlife viewing via boat, motor around looking for icebergs, boat to Silluak (North Arm) among the astonishing fjords and then hike to a waterfall or fish for char. Sometimes there's a fish fry on the beach, plus bannock (traditional bread roasted over the fire on a stick). Another top spot is Sillikuluk (Rose Island), an archaeological site of 600 Inuit graves.

The best views

A post shared by Penny Simms (@tiquejewel) External Link Title on Sep 20, 2017 at 11:29am PDT

Hike wherever as long as you’re prepared — panoramic views are literally all around you. From basecamp, favourite vistas are from the hilltop inukshuk and Torr Bay. If you want to get up higher than the clouds, rent a helicopter and hover over the Torngat peaks.

On the Atlantic and Canada’s farthest east point, Newfoundland and Labrador — the far-flung communities, seafaring culture, Celtic musical roots, and emerald cliffs — will stir you. Find out what makes the place enchanting and like no other.

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Torngat Mountains National Park in Newfoundland, Canada

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Torngat Mountains National Park

Top choice in Labrador

Named from the Inuktitut word torngait (place of spirits), this national park is the ancestral home of Inuit and their predecessors. Its spectacular wilderness features herds of caribou, polar bears and even seals in a freshwater habitat. The park comprises 9700 sq km, extending from Saglek Fjord in the south, including all islands and islets, to the very northern tip of Labrador. No superlatives can do the beauty of this place justice.

Visitation is difficult since there is only plane and boat access. The park office is in Nain.

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https://​www​.pc​.gc​.ca​/torngat

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Torngat Mountains National Park

torngat mountains trip

  • 1.1 History
  • 1.2 Landscape
  • 1.3 Flora and fauna
  • 1.4 Climate
  • 1.5 Visitor information
  • 2.2 By boat
  • 3 Fees and permits
  • 4 Get around
  • 11 Stay safe

Torngat Mountains National Park is a Canadian national park on the Labrador Peninsula in Nunatsiavut , occupies the northernmost tip of Labrador , Canada .

torngat mountains trip

The Torngat Mountains are named for the Inuktitut word torngait , meaning "place of spirits". The largest and most remote national park in Atlantic Canada , Torngat covers 9,700 km² (3,700 sq mi) of Arctic Cordillera from Cape Chidley south to Saglek Fjord.

This is Inuit country, as it has been for thousands of years. The national park was created as part of the Nunavik Inuit Land Claims Agreement which came into effect in 2008. Under the agreement, Inuit people (formerly called "Eskimos", a term that is offensive to many Inuit) can continue hunting, fishing and trapping within the park boundaries.

Torngat is the southernmost part of the Arctic Cordillera, a mountain range which extends northward across Baffin Island and Nunavut . Terrain is rugged, with mountains and fjords.

Flora and fauna

The park protects wildlife including caribou, polar bears, peregrine falcon, and golden eagle.

The Arctic Cordillera represents one of Canada's most inhospitable climates, with temperatures in the −35 °C (−31 °F) range commonplace during dark, long Arctic winters.

Visitor information

  • Park website
  • Park office , ☏ +1 709-922-1290 , toll-free: +1-888-922-1290 , [email protected] .  

Nunatsiavut is remote, accessible only by small aircraft or coastal ferries. The park, as the northernmost point in Labrador , is even further from the beaten path; access is by boat or chartered aircraft only.

The park borders Nunavik on Quebec 's Ungava Peninsula - which is just as inaccessible. Nain, a tiny community in northern Nunatsiavut, Labrador is the usual jumping-off point to reach Torngat Park.

  • Nunatsiavut Group of Companies operates flights to the Saglek airstrip.
  • Linkum Tours offer packages which include hiking and a trip to Saglek Fjord.

Fees and permits

Visitors must obtain permits, register and undergo an orientation before setting off on treks or boat trips.

As of 2024, fees have not been imposed for park admission.

Map

There are no roads or infrastructure in the park. Access is primarily by boat or on foot; hikers are advised to travel with an Inuit bear guard.

Speedboats, longliners, polar bear guards, helicopter and fixed wing charters may be obtained through the base camp ( ☏ +1-855-TORNGAT (8676428) , fax +1 709 896-5834).

The Torngats are the highest mountains in Canada east of the Rockies. Mt Caubvick/D’Iberville is the tallest at 1652 m (5437 feet); a few other peaks reach above 1538 m (5000 ft).

There are hundreds of archaeological sites in the park, some dating back almost 7,000 years. More recent remains include Moravian Mission sites, as well as Hudson Bay Company trading posts in Saglek and Nachvak fjords.

As the park is remote and remains in its natural state, it is well suited to wildlife watching - including birds, caribou and bears.

Wilderness-oriented recreational activities include hiking, scrambling, kayaking and day or multi-day cultural and natural excursions, often with Inuit guides.

There are no roads, trails, or signs in Torngat Mountains National Park. There are, however, unmarked hiking routes and traditional Inuit travel routes marked by inuksuit (stone markers). Visitors can explore the park on guided or unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multiday backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions.

With help and logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station, Parks Canada offers a range of day trips and overnight hiking opportunities in Torngat Mountains National Park.

There are many opportunities for backpacking in the vast and diverse terrain of Torngat Mountains National Park. Visitors can explore established hiking routes or map out their own route through different areas.

Parks Canada has prepared multi-day and shorter single-day hiking route descriptions for visitors. These outline known routes and offer some interpretation of the area. These route descriptions are reliable for describing the area that you are hiking in, but you must carry your own map, compass, and GPS. Do not use the route description as your only means of navigation.

Parks Canada also sets up satellite camps each summer to provide support for visitors that are looking for an overnight hiking experience. These satellite camps are big enough to hold 5-6 pup tents enclosed by a temporary bear fence. Visitors can do day hikes to and from these camps to areas of interest, ideally in the company of an Inuit bear guard.

For more information about hiking in the park, and the level of skill required for different routes, contact Torngat Mountains National Park or Torngats Base Camp and Research Station.

This is Arctic wilderness; there are no amenities within the park. The most basic provisions (groceries, equipment rental, accommodations, police and medical assistance) are available on a very limited basis in Nain and Kangiqsualujjuaq. If you need supplies, bring them with you.

Bring what you need and leave no trace when you leave. Be bear aware: stored or cached foodstuffs may require bear-resistant containers.

While there are many fresh water streams and ponds in the Torngat Mountains. this untested water should be boiled, treated (iodine or chlorine in warm water) or filtered (<0.5 microns fine filter) before use.

  • Torngat Mountains Base Camp , On Saglek Fjord, outside the park , ☏ +1-855-TORNGAT (8676428) , [email protected] . Tent-style camping accommodations at the park’s southern end, enclosed by bear fences. Seasonal, mid-July to end-August.  

The mountains of northern Nunatsiavut are very much for the experienced, independent voyager. This is the Arctic, polar bear country where distances are vast (the park covers twice the area of Prince Edward Island , Canada's smallest province) and assistance is not always close at hand. Unless one is experienced with this region, it's best to rely on an Inuit guide when venturing far beyond the base camp. Native guides are permitted to carry firearms (where visitors are not) and know the area well.

Bring warm clothing and extra provisions, as adverse (unpredictable and bitterly cold) weather, sometimes even in summer, may substantially delay your transport out of the park. Under adverse conditions, outside assistance may be days away even in an emergency.

Carry bear repellent and keep food out of reach of dangerous animals . Polar bears, black bears, foxes and wolves are all present in the area.

Leave a copy of your plans with friends or family, so that they may contact police in an emergency (Nain's RCMP detachment is ☏ +1 709 922-2862 ; Parks Canada is ☏ +1 709 922-1290 in Nain and operates 24-hour emergency dispatch from faraway Jasper , Alberta at ☏ +1 780-852-3100 or ☏ +1-877-852-3100 ).

A satellite phone may be the only means of limited (and expensive) communication in this remote location. There are no satellite phones for rent or sale in Nain; the closest vendor is in Goose Bay.

  • Nunatsiavut has no intercity road network. A coastal ferry or aircraft leads south to rejoin the Trans-Labrador Highway at Goose Bay .

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Labrador Region

Torngat Mountains - Koroc - Palmer River Loop Trail - Parks Canada

Torngat mountains national park.

  • Jan 1 - Dec 31

This strenuous multi-day hiking loop offers the visitors the opportunity to follow several variations of the main suggested route to either shorten or lengthen their hike. There are also countless opportunities for side trips that can be done as day trips along the way.

  • http://www.parkscanada.gc.ca/torngat
  • +1 (709) 922 1290 +1 (709) 458 2417 +1 (888) 922 1290 (toll free)
  • [email protected]

Locations & Dates

  • Northern Labrador Park Head Quarters, Torngat Mountains National Park
  • 59.1800, -64.4372

Back country registration is free but required.

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Torngat Mountains National Park - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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Torngat Mountains National Park: Discover Canada’s Spectacular Wilderness Frontier

Discover torngat mountains national park.

Are you eager to explore the pristine and rugged landscapes of Canada ? Let’s zero in on Torngat Mountains National Park in Newfoundland and Labrador , where the adventures are as vast as the park.

Torngat Mountains National Park is a massive area of 9,700 square kilometers. It’s a sanctuary where the untamed wilderness preserves both the integrity of wildlife habitats and the ongoing link between nature and the cultural heritage of the Inuit, the area’s indigenous people.

Ensure to follow park guidelines and regulations laid out by Parks Canada to conserve this natural wonder. A visit here is not just a journey through staggering landscapes but also an opportunity to contribute to the protection of this piece of Canada’s natural heritage.

START PLANNING YOUR TRIP

Top 3 facts about torngat mountains national park.

Torngat Mountains National Park is a vast protected area spanning approximately 9,700 square kilometers (3,700 square miles), making it one of Canada’s largest national parks.

Wildlife Diversity

Despite its harsh climate, the park is home to a surprisingly diverse range of wildlife, including species such as polar bears, caribou, Arctic foxes, and several species of whales. Over 20 species of mammals and 100 species of birds have been recorded in the park.

Tallest Peak

Mount Caubvick, located within the Torngat Mountains, is the highest peak in mainland Canada east of the Rockies, reaching an impressive elevation of 1,652 meters (5,417 feet) above sea level.

Camping and transportation in Torngat Mountains National Park

How to get to torngat mountains national park.

Getting to Torngat Mountains National Park can be an adventure due to its remote location. Here’s a general guide on how to reach the park:

  • By Air: The most common way to access the park is by flying into nearby airports and arranging for further transportation. The nearest major airports are in Newfoundland and Labrador: – Goose Bay Airport (YYR) in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. – Nain Airport (YDP) in Nain, Nunatsiavut, which is closer to the park but has limited services.
  • Charter Flights: From Goose Bay or Nain, you can charter a flight to Saglek, the park’s main base camp, or other designated landing sites.
  • Boat or Cruise : Some tour operators offer boat cruises or expeditions to Torngat Mountains National Park during the summer. These trips usually depart from communities along the Labrador coast, such as Nain or Hopedale.
  • Guided Tours : Consider joining a guided tour or expedition organized by experienced outfitters or Indigenous-owned tour companies. These tours often include transportation, accommodation, and guided activities, providing a safe and immersive experience in the park.

Places to Stay Near Torngat Mountains National Park

Given the remote and rugged nature of Torngat Mountains National Park, options for accommodation and camping nearby are limited. Here are some possibilities:

  • Base Camps in the Park : The park operates two main base camps, Nachvak Fjord and Saglek Bay , where visitors can stay in designated facilities. These camps offer basic amenities such as tents, cabins, food services, and washroom facilities. Reservations are required, and access is typically limited to those participating in guided tours or research expeditions.
  • Camping in Designated Areas : If you’re looking for a more adventurous experience, camping is permitted in designated areas within the park. However, facilities are minimal, and visitors must be fully self-sufficient, carrying all necessary gear and supplies. Permits are required for overnight stays, and camping is subject to strict regulations to minimize environmental impact.
  • Nearby Communities: The closest communities to Torngat Mountains National Park are Nain and Hopedale, located along the Labrador coast. While these communities are not directly adjacent to the park, they offer some accommodation options such as guesthouses, bed and breakfasts, or small hotels. Remember that transportation to and from the park may be limited and require additional arrangements.
  • Lodges and Outfitters: Some lodges and outfitters in Labrador offer packages that include accommodations and guided excursions to Torngat Mountains National Park. These options provide a more comfortable and organized way to experience the park while supporting local businesses.

You cannot drive within Torngat Mountains National Park. The park is extremely remote and rugged, with no roads or infrastructure for vehicular access.

Due to its remote and rugged nature, the park lacks any infrastructure for public transportation.

As Torngat Mountains National Park is extremely remote and lacks roads for vehicular access, there are no parking facilities within the park itself.

Best Time to Go to Torngat Mountains National Park

July through August is a delight with milder weather and easier access by sea. It’s the prime time for viewing wildlife like caribou, black bears, and more! Fancy catching the sight of a wandering polar bear from a safe distance? This is your chance. Plus, the flora is in full bloom, painting the tundra in vivid colors.

The Torngat Mountains in winter – December to March – are for the bravest souls. Ferocious winds, heavy snowfall, and frigid temperatures dominate, making it less ideal for casual visits. Sea ice forms, but the animals, including polar bears and arctic foxes, are fewer. You’d need to be well-prepared for extreme winter conditions if you plan a visit during this season.

The mountains remain snow-clad in the spring, April to June, and the temperatures begin to climb, although it can still be chilly. You won’t see many polar bears as they start to move off the sea ice. This is the season to catch the last of the winter’s magnificence before the thaw, so make sure you’re ready for icy conditions.

Come September to November, the park transforms with a palette of oranges and reds. Weather can be unpredictable, bringing a mix of sunny days and snow flurries. While the caribou start migrating south, this isn’t the best time to spot polar bears as they return to the ice. Fall is also less crowded, which is great for a serene escape.

Must-See Attractions

Nachvak fjord.

This stunning fjord is one of the park’s most iconic features, with towering cliffs rising dramatically from the water’s edge. Visitors can explore its pristine waters by boat, kayak, or on guided tours, immersing themselves in the sheer grandeur of the landscape.

Mount Caubvick (Mont D’Iberville)

As the highest peak in mainland Canada east of the Rockies, Mount Caubvick offers breathtaking panoramic views of the surrounding mountains, fjords, and glaciers. While climbing to the summit is a challenging endeavor reserved for experienced mountaineers, even admiring the mountain from a distance is awe-inspiring.

Northern Lights

Torngat Mountains National Park offers prime viewing opportunities for the mesmerizing Northern Lights during winter. Away from light pollution, the park’s remote location provides optimal conditions for witnessing this celestial phenomenon in all its glory.

Helpful Tips: Making the Most of Your Adventure to Torngat Mountains National Park

Torngat Mountains National Park is remote and accessible only by air or boat, so planning your trip well in advance is crucial. Book accommodations, transportation, and guided tours early, especially during peak seasons.

Prepare for the Weather

The weather in Torngat Mountains National Park can be unpredictable and harsh, with cold temperatures, strong winds, and sudden changes in conditions. Pack appropriate clothing and gear for the season, including layers, waterproof outerwear, sturdy footwear, and cold-weather accessories.

Know Your Limits

The terrain in Torngat Mountains National Park can be rugged and challenging, with steep slopes, rocky terrain, and unpredictable weather. Be honest about your fitness level and outdoor experience, and choose activities and trails that suit your abilities. Consider joining guided tours or hiring local guides for added safety and support.

Obtain Necessary Permits

Visitors to Torngat Mountains National Park are required to obtain park access permits in advance. Check the park’s website or contact park authorities for information on permits, fees, and regulations before your visit.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Torngat Mountains National Park

The Torngat Mountains boast a variety of arctic animals, including numerous caribou herds. Keep your eyes peeled for polar bears that roam the area, and don’t forget to look up – you might spot peregrine falcons soaring high above.

Safety should always be your top priority in such a wild and remote location. It’s highly recommended that you engage experienced local guides who know the terrain and can prevent unexpected encounters with wildlife. Pack proper gear for harsh weather conditions and always register with park authorities before starting your explorations.

Don’t miss capturing the rugged beauty of Saglek Fjord, the hauntingly beautiful ghost settlements, and the sharply rising peaks often crowned with ice even in summer. Sunrise and sunset provide magical light for that perfect shot of the untamed landscape.

The trails here are untouched and wild, with no official paths, offering a truly unique hiking experience. If you’re keen on an adventure, trek toward the base of Mount Caubvick or explore the various fjords. Remember to always hike with a guide for safety and the best experience.

Being prepared is key. Dress in layers for the unpredictable weather and pack high-energy, portable food. Satellite phones or emergency beacons are crucial as there is no cell service. Book your chartered flights early for the high season and secure a spot with local guides to enhance your visit. Lastly, don’t forget your permit for the park.

The Torngat Mountains hold deep cultural significance for the Inuit. The name “Torngait,” meaning place of spirits, hints at the spiritual importance of these peaks. For over 6000 years, Indigenous peoples, including the Maritime Archaic, Dorset, Thule, and more recent Inuit, called these lands home. Traces of their historical presence can still be seen through tent rings and stone structures scattered throughout the park.

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Take a hike in Torngat Mountains National Park

Marvel at the gorgeous fjords, landscapes ablaze with autumn colours, and wonderful wildlife sighting opportunities, including the possibility of both polar and black bears .

Travel to one of the least-visited coastlines in the country—the Torngats are simply unbeatable!

Some of the tallest mountains in Canada east of the Rockies form the backdrop to this national park, the only one initiated and staffed entirely by Inuit.

Cross the Arctic Circle

Enjoy the stunning mountain scenery of Kangerlussuaq Fjord (Søndre Strømfjord) as you sail south from Kangerlussuaq to Baffin Bay.

At 190 kilometres in length, this incredible waterway showcases some of Greenland’s finest scenery.

Enjoy your special moment of crossing the Arctic Circle , catch a glimpse of the Greenland ice cap, and watch for Northern Lights above the mountain peaks.

Visit Nuuk, Greenland’s intriguing capital

Take your time to wander the city of Nuuk, which offers a fascinating glimpse into Greenland ’s history—and future.

Enjoy the bustle of activity at the art galleries, cafés, and restaurants that possess a strong Scandinavian influence in their design, architecture, and flavours.

Look a little closer and you will see modern Inuit artworks and historic buildings from the whaling era dotting the streets, too.

Be sure to visit the excellent museum , offering a deep dive into the fascinating history and culture of Greenland.

Enjoy a warm Inuit welcome in Nain, capital of Nunatsiavut

Journey to lovely Labrador, where few have had the pleasure of going; fewer still have carried onwards to Nunatsiavut , the Inuit region of which Nain is the administrative capital.

Stop in at the historic Moravian church , enjoy the vibrant musical tradition, and peruse plenty of art and handicrafts that await you.

Adventure Canada has a family connection here and you can expect a very warm welcome.

Visit the restored Viking archaeological site at L’Anse aux Meadows

Travel back in time to the only authenticated Norse archeological site in all of North America, L’Anse aux Meadows —a must-see!

Learn more about the Viking settlement here, first discovered in the 1960s and now reconstructed, with a fabulous interpretation centre and wonderful guides in period costume who bring Viking history to life.

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Our spacious, ice-strengthened vessel features twenty Zodiacs, and advanced navigation equipment. A doctor, paramedic, medical clinic, and enhanced health regime offer peace of mind. Roomy facilities offer comfortable travel with plenty of breathing room for all.

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  • Get inspired by the possibilities.
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torngat mountains trip

Torngat Mountains National Park

Bears gut to branagin island valley, koroc river - palmer river loop, nakvak brook trek, traveling independently, leave no trace.

There are no roads, trails, or signs in Torngat Mountains National Park. There are, however, unmarked hiking routes and traditional Inuit travel routes marked by inuksuit. Visitors can explore the park on guided/ unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multiday backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions.

With help and logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station, Parks Canada offers a range of day trips and overnight hiking opportunities in Torngat Mountains National Park. These are tailored for different skill and fitness levels, and there is something for everyone!

Multi-Day Backpacking

Parks Canada has prepared a number of multi-day and shorter single-day hiking route descriptions for visitors. These outline known routes and offer some interpretation of the area. Parks Canada staff have hiked these areas with visitor safety in mind and have selected the best routes possible. These route descriptions are reliable for describing the area that you are hiking in, but you must carry your own map, compass, and GPS. Do not use the route description as your only means of navigation.

Parks Canada also sets up satellite camps each summer to provide support for visitors that are looking for an overnight hiking experience. These satellite camps are big enough to hold 5-6 pup tents enclosed by a temporary bear fence. Visitors can do day hikes to and from these camps to areas of interest, ideally in the company of an Inuit bear guard.

For more information about hiking opportunities in the park, and the level of skill required for different routes, please contact Torngat Mountains National Park or Torngats Base Camp and Research Station.

Topographical Maps

For reliable hiking maps of the Torngat Mountains National Park, we recommend 1:50,000 scale NTS topographic maps. Also available are 1: 250,000 scale topographical maps. These maps are good for general route planning: 14L - Hebron 24I – George River 24P – Pointe Le Droit 14M – Cape White Handkerchief 25A – Grenfell Sound

There are a number of useful map dealers online as well as the Canada Map Office on-line search tool.

To buy 1:50,000 and 1:250,000 topographical maps go to: http://www.canmaps.com/topo/browse-topo-maps/014.html and select the map area you want coverage for.

You can also visit the Canada Map Office at: http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/topographic-information/maps/9771

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  • DESTINATION GUIDE

The essential guide to visiting Canada

Here’s what you need to know about the world’s second largest country—when to go, where to stay, what to do, and how to get around.

A cityscape lighting up at dusk along a smooth, blue, body of water

Why you should visit Canada

The majesty of Niagara Falls and Banff National Park . Champagne powder at British Columbia ski resorts. Dense forests, teal waters. Polar bears and spirit bears and loons. Poutine in Montreal , lobster rolls in Halifax. The most lakes of any country in the world.

Reflections of rugged mountains and evergreen trees in a mountain lake.

Best time to visit Canada

Spring: Whale-watch at Clayoquot Sound (pronounced clack-what) as some 20,000 gray whales migrate past the coast, a UNESCO Biosphere Region. A million tulips bloom in Ottawa as part of a spring festival .

Summer:   This is prime season for canoeing Ontario’s many lakes, driving the glorious Sea-to-Sky Highway   from Vancouver to Whistler, rock-climbing at Squamish, and golfing at a world-renowned seaside course, like Nova Scotia’s Cabot Cliffs or Cabot Links . End of summer sees the stars come out at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF).

Autumn:   Polar bears gather in large numbers in Churchill , Manitoba , waiting for ice to form on Hudson Bay so they can hunt seal. For fall colors, take a boat trip up the Saguenay River, in Quebec.

Winter:   Dogsled, ice-fish, and snowshoe at the Carnaval de Québec winter festival. Ski or snowboard at any of a score of high, steep, powdery ski resorts that populate the west, including Whistler Blackcomb , Kicking Horse , and Revelstoke , the last being one of the snowiest places on Earth. At Whistler, ride the bobsleigh track featured at the 2010 Winter Olympics.

People on a whale/bird watching trip look to the sky with binoculars.

Lay of the land

Cities:   Mountains and ocean sandwich outdoorsy Vancouver.   Lakefront Toronto’s dramatic skyline is interspersed with museums and vibrant ethnic neighborhoods. Sophisticated cobblestoned Montreal is where Canadians go to let their hair down. Colorful houses cling to the rock of St. John’s while icebergs drift offshore. “Any boat ride that has you entering St. John’s Harbour at dusk is a divine experience,” says legendary Newfoundland folk-rock musician Alan Doyle .  

West:   In British Columbia, get lost among the islands of Haida Gwaii,   home to some of the densest, most concentrated coastal temperate rainforest left on Earth. In Desolation Sound,   cultural interpreter and bear guide Klemkwateki (Randy) Louie teaches visitors how to weave with cedar bark and to carve miniature canoe paddles. He also takes guests by boat up the Toba Inlet (Yekwamen), among whales, orcas, seals, and sea lions, to the Klite River to watch grizzly bears in their natural habitat. “I’ve been involved in my Coast Salish teachings for 30 years, singing, drumming, dancing, giving visitors some Klahoose history. We’ve handed this down to the younger generation and to our guests to help with building a connection in working together.”

The 47-mile backcountry West Coast Trail (WCT) crosses beaches studded with flowerpot rock formations, and passes through groves of old-growth trees. Down the Vancouver Island coast is the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail , a shorter but more hilly option. “Both trails zigzag through thick coastal rainforest with lots of muddy sections and ladders to help you up and down the steep slopes,” says Taryn Eyton, founder of HappiestOutdoors.ca .

Theforest suspension bridge over Pete Wolfe Creek on the Juan de Fuca trail on the way to Mystic Beach on Vancouver Island.

North:   In the Northwest Territories (NWT), paddle the Nahanni River through Canada’s deepest river canyons, along rapids, and past Virginia Falls, nearly twice the height of Niagara. NWT is also where you can canoe and swim in enormous Great Slave Lake and spot the northern lights , visible here 240 nights per year.  

Prairie provinces:   Elk Island National Park , in Alberta , is home to bison, elk, and more than 250 bird species. Nearby on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River, Métis Crossing features a cultural center, historic exhibits, and dome accommodations with transparent ceilings for night-sky viewing. In early fall, Jasper National Park holds a Dark Sky festival with family-friendly events like night hikes.

Fly in by floatplane to lodges in Saskatchewan or Manitoba for trophy catches of northern pike, walleye, and lake trout. “Since there’s very little fishing pressure, the fish are typically giants, and more than willing to hit just about any lure you show them,” says Patrick Walsh, editor of Outdoor Canada   magazine.  

Ontario:   Charter a boat and cruise the 120 miles from the capital Ottawa down the 19 th- century Rideau Canal (the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America), through a series of lakes, locks, and rivers. Drive west alongside Lake Ontario to Prince Edward County , one of the hottest vacation spots in Canada, known for its wineries, food, hip hotels, and historic small towns like Wellington and Picton. Climb the immense sand dunes of Sandbanks Provincial Park, the largest freshwater barrier beach and dune system in the world. Continuing west along the lake, a new Canadian Canoe Museum opened in Peterborough in May 2024.

Quebec:   Montreal comes alive in summer with a series of events, such as the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal . In compact, French-speaking Quebec City, you’d be forgiven for thinking you were in a charming town in northern France. Off the beaten path, drive the Gaspé peninsula, encompassing four national parks and iconic offshore limestone formation Percé. Stop in at the International Garden Festival at Grand-Métis, Quebec.

Atlantic Canada:   A magical place of mountains and verdant coastline, Gros Morne National Park,   in Newfoundland , is one of the few places where you can stroll atop the Earth’s mantle , exposed when two continental plates collided. Visitors can hike to the top of Western Brook Pond fjord for an iconic view , or board a boat . The oldest known European settlement in North America—beating Columbus by centuries—is at L'Anse aux Meadows . Windswept homes of timber, peat, and sod, the Viking site lay undiscovered until 1960.

At the Cliffs of Fundy UNESCO Geopark in Nova Scotia   marvel at the world’s highest tides in action.  

Cape Breton Island is home to one of the world’s great drives, the 185-mile Cabot Trail. A few hardy types bike the steep winding hills. Offshore, visitors whale-watch or fish enormous bluefin tuna.

Flower Pot rocks, Soley Cove, Five Islands area, Nova Scotia, Canada, Cobequid Bay, Bay of Fundy; Ocean tides

Getting around Canada

By plane:   Leading carrier Air Canada has more than 900 flights daily. Floatplanes operated by small companies connect remote locations. U.S.-bound passengers can pre-clear U.S. customs and immigration at nine Canadian airports.  

B y train:   Rail is the time-honored way to see Canada, and operators run specialized services for tourists, like Rocky Mountaineer’s deluxe routes from Vancouver through the Canadian Rockies to Banff or Jasper. Regular train service by Via runs a limited number of routes.

By bus:   Intercity bus service has declined across Canada.

By car:   A car is essential for moving about within regions of Canada, but some top tourist spots—like Churchill for polar bears—are accessible only by plane or train.

By boat:   Bounded by three oceans and with an abundance of lakes and rivers, a cruise or boat trip is a great way to see the country.

Know before you go

Cultural heritage:   Native rights and the debts owed by settlers have become front and center in the public discourse, with land acknowledgements , which originated in Canada, now standard practice. Canada’s newest (1999) territory, Nunavut , is governed by the Inuit , and Torngat Mountains National Park , on the northern tip of Labrador, is owned and managed by the Inuit, the first of its kind.

The transcontinental railway helped establish Canada as a nation, but at the same time pushed aside Indigenous peoples and their rights. Blasting through the Canadian Rockies, untold numbers of imported Chinese workers died and were buried by their fellow countrymen, often in unmarked graves.

Canada became a self-governing dominion in 1867, but when Great Britain declared war in 1914 Canada automatically joined too as it did not yet control its own foreign affairs. Canada gained legislative independence from Britain in 1931, an official flag of its own only in 1965, and constitutional independence from the U.K. as recently as 1982.

Visitors arrive at Saglek Fjord's North Arm by boat and can fish for Arctic char. This site has been used for thousands of years as a summertime camping ground for the Inuit.

Hours: Bars in Canadian cities typically stay open until 2 a.m. Drinking age is 18 or 19, depending on province or territory, while some remote northern communities place restrictions on alcohol use. Marijuana is legal for both recreational and medicinal uses.

LGBTQ+:   Canada is consistently ranked the world’s best country for LGBTQ+ rights and safety of travelers. The country legalized same-sex marriage in 2005—at the time only the fourth country in the world to do so. Pride Toronto (June) is one of the largest organized gay pride festivals in the world.

How to visit Canada sustainably

Greenpeace was founded in Canada and today the country ranks a respectable 14 th out of 76 countries on the Green Future Index . Keep your distance from wildlife. Bring your own reusable water bottles, coffee cups, and toiletries. Put all garbage and recyclables into designated bins. Support Indigenous peoples by taking guided walks and visiting Indigenous art galleries.

What to read and watch

Anne of Green Gables , by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This globally loved 1908 children’s book set on Prince Edward Island was adapted most recently into a Netflix series. November 30, 2024, will mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of Montgomery.

Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands , by Kate Beaton. This autobiographical comic from Cape Breton’s Kate Beaton recounts her experience as one of the few women working in the rough-and-tumble oil patch of northern Alberta. Beaton’s story also captures the never-ending tale of Canadians from the Atlantic provinces migrating westward for work.

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America , by Thomas King. This history of Indigenous peoples in North America has been turned into a 2020 documentary .

The Sleeping Car Porter ,   by Suzette Mayr. The award-winning 2022 novel focuses on a 1920s Black closeted gay Canadian working as a railway porter to save money to attend dental school.

The Hockey Sweater , by Roch Carrier. This 1979 short story about a Quebec boy who receives a hated Toronto Maple Leafs jersey in error has been an enduring favorite of Canadians, managing to capture the importance of both hockey and winter to Canadian children, and also serving as an explainer of relations between English and French Canada.

Schitt’s Creek.   The pandemic’s surprise hit series was written by and stars Canadians, and more than anything has a gentle, Canadian-defining vibe to it. If these characters are your people, you’ll feel at home in Canada.

Kim’s Convenience.   Written by Ins Choi, this sitcom about a Korean-Canadian family who own a corner store in downtown Toronto captures the intimate feel of the city’s many ethnic neighborhoods, as well as the common multi-generational immigrant experience in one of the world’s most international metropolises.

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  • DOG SLEDDING

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COMMENTS

  1. Plan Your Trip

    You can choose to begin your travel by air or road. And no matter where your journey begins, we're here to respond to any questions or concerns, and to make the process […] Experiences; ... Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station 1 Centralia Drive PO Box 1101 Happy Valley-Goose Bay, NL AOP 1C0. p 1-709-217-2550. Follow Us.

  2. Plan your visit

    The Torngat Mountains Base Camp offers packaged excursions that include air travel from Goose Bay, N.L., to Saglek, N.L., and boat and/or helicopter transportation from Saglek, N.L., to the Base Camp, which is located at St. John's Harbour in Saglek Bay. Packages include round-trip air transport from Goose Bay to Saglek, boat and/or ...

  3. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Explore Torngat Mountains National Park through an Inuit cultural lens. Join Inuit to experience spiritual and cultural sites and a harvesting trip as they gather food for the Base Camp. You can also take an overnight trip into spectacular fjords where their ancestors have camped and walked before. Listen to the ancient stories and legends of ...

  4. Activities and experiences

    There are no roads, trails, or signs in Torngat Mountains National Park. There are, however, unmarked hiking routes and traditional Inuit travel routes marked by inuksuit. Visitors can explore the park on guided/ unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multi-day backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions.

  5. Bucket list guide: Torngat Mountains National Park

    The Torngat Mountains are remote and there are no roads -- that's the draw. The park is 9,700 square kilometres of wilderness on untamed northern Labrador's Atlantic coast. It's a long journey because you have to fly through Labrador, either Goose Bay or Nain, from St. John's, Newfoundland or Montreal, Quebec. From there, it's a charter flight ...

  6. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Torngat Mountains National Park (Inuktitut: Tongait KakKasuangita SilakKijapvinga) is a Canadian national park located on the Labrador Peninsula in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.The park encompasses 9,700 km 2 (3,700 sq mi; 2,400,000 acres) of mountainous terrain between Northern Quebec and the Labrador Sea. It is the largest national park in Atlantic Canada and the southernmost ...

  7. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Visitation is difficult since there is only plane and boat access. The park office is in Nain. 709-922-1290. https:// www .pc .gc .ca /torngat. Suggest an edit to this attraction. Named from the Inuktitut word torngait (place of spirits), this national park is the ancestral home of Inuit and their predecessors. Its spectacular….

  8. Experiences

    Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research Station offers visitors daily excursions from base camp into the park and the surrounding landscape. Parks Canada staff provide interpretive programming on all trips in the park, and with logistical support from Torngat Mountains Base Camp, we are able to offer visitors a wide range of experiences.

  9. Torngat Mountains Safari

    Call 1.406.541.2677. Start Planning My Trip. Explore the Canadian north on this 8-day Arctic safari. The wilderness is yours to explore as you hike to pristine lakes, relax beside streams and rivers, and encounter the wildlife of the region. Each day is unique in the Torngat Mountains on this choose-your-own-adventure itinerary.

  10. Nine Reasons to Visit Torngat Mountains National Park

    1. It's BIG! Torngat Mountains National Park comprises 9,600 square kilometres, basically forming the whole northern tip of Labrador. 2. You'll get a natural high. The Torngat mountain range includes the tallest peaks in eastern Canada. Mount Caubvick (also known as Mont D'Iberville) tops out at 1,652 metres.

  11. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Torngat Mountains Base Camp, On Saglek Fjord, outside the park, ☏ +1-855-TORNGAT (8676428), [email protected]. Tent-style camping accommodations at the park's southern end, enclosed by bear fences. Seasonal, mid-July to end-August. Stay safe [edit] The mountains of northern Nunatsiavut are very much for the experienced, independent voyager.

  12. Torngat Mountains

    There are also countless opportunities for side trips that can be done as day trips along the way. ... Torngat Mountains - Koroc - Palmer River Loop Trail - Parks Canada. Torngat Mountains National Park. Jan 1 - Dec 31. Website.

  13. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Select one of the below 3 best Torngat Mountains National Park trips for 2024 and 2025.Your local English-speaking guide will lead your small group or personalized private tour on an extraordinary adventure exploring Torngat Mountains National Park.Our Torngat Mountains National Park trips for 2024 feature whale watching, wildlife viewing, small ship cruises, cruises, and cultural, and start ...

  14. Torngat Mountains National Park

    Torngat Mountains National Park, Labrador: See 4 reviews, articles, and 15 photos of Torngat Mountains National Park, ranked No.15 on Tripadvisor among 49 attractions in Labrador.

  15. Torngat Mountains National Park: Discover Canada's Spectacular

    Torngat Mountains National Park is a massive area of 9,700 square kilometers. It's a sanctuary where the untamed wilderness preserves both the integrity of wildlife habitats and the ongoing link between nature and the cultural heritage of the Inuit, the area's indigenous people. Ensure to follow park guidelines and regulations laid out by ...

  16. Getting here

    Chartered Flights to Torngat Mountains Base Camp. The Torngat Mountains Base Camp offers packaged excursions that include air travel from Goose Bay, N.L., to Saglek, N.L., (via Nain) and boat and/or helicoper transport from Saglek, N.L., to the Base Camp, which is located at St. John's Harbour in Saglek Bay. Packages include round-trip air transport from Goose Bay to Saglek, boat and/or ...

  17. Greenland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

    Travel by small expedition boat on this 15 day adventure and explore: Greenland & Wild Labrador. Cross the Arctic Circle, experience a Zodiac Cruise at the foot of a glacier and visit local museums, shops and cafes during community visits. ... The opportunity to spend four days hiking in the Torngat Mountains National Park provide guests with ...

  18. Greenland & Wild Labrador: A Torngat Mountains Adventure

    Take a hike in Torngat Mountains National Park. Marvel at the gorgeous fjords, landscapes ablaze with autumn colours, and wonderful wildlife sighting opportunities, including the possibility of both polar and black bears.. Travel to one of the least-visited coastlines in the country—the Torngats are simply unbeatable!. Some of the tallest mountains in Canada east of the Rockies form the ...

  19. Labrador and Torngat

    Call 1.406.541.2677. Start Planning My Trip. The coast of Labrador and Torngat Mountains amaze with their wild mountain ranges, rich history of more than three different cultures, and breathtaking wildlife viewings. Numerous wildlife species are found along this coastline, including bears, seals, whales, and migratory and resident birds.

  20. Hiking

    There are no roads, trails, or signs in Torngat Mountains National Park. There are, however, unmarked hiking routes and traditional Inuit travel routes marked by inuksuit. Visitors can explore the park on guided/ unguided day hikes and interpretive walks, overnight camping trips, multiday backpacking treks, and technical rock-climbing excursions.

  21. Where is Canada's Torngat Mountains National Park?

    Interested in experiencing this spectacular national park for yourself? There are chartered flights available from Goose Bay, N.L. to Saglek and boat/helicopter rides to the Torngat Mountains Base Camp. According to Parks Canada, visitors can book round-trip packages that include air transport, meals, tent accommodation, and guided excursions.

  22. The essential guide to visiting Canada

    By boat: Bounded by three oceans and with an abundance of lakes and rivers, a cruise or boat trip is a great way to see the country. ... At Saglek Fjord, in Torngat Mountains National Park ...