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argentina travel vaccine requirements

REQUIREMENTS ON ENTRY TO THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC

Date of update: August 24, 2022  

New rules for the current COVID-19 entry requirements

Since August 24 th 2022, it is not required to present anymore neither the affidavit “Declaración Jurada”, a COVID-19 test, nor a COVID-19 health insurance to enter Argentina for Argentine Citizens, Foreign Residents and Non-Resident Foreigners.  

It is also not required to do the quarantine.

In the case a COVID-19 positive or potential suspected case is detected or reported while entering Argentina, the case will proceed according to the same prevention and control measures of any acute breath infection

It is not required to show proof of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter Argentina.

CHECK THE FOLLOWING LINK FOR COUNTRIES THAT DO NOT REQUIRE A VISA TO ENTER ARGENTINA

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Update on Change to U.S. Travel Policy Requiring COVID-19 Vaccination for nonimmigrant travel

The Administration will end the COVID-19 vaccine requirements for international air travelers at the end of the day on May 11, the same day that the COVID-19 public health emergency ends. This means starting May 12, noncitizen nonimmigrant air passengers will no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated with an accepted COVID-19 vaccine to board a flight to the United States. CDC’s Amended Order Implementing Presidential Proclamation on Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic will no longer be in effect when the Presidential Proclamation Advancing the Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic is revoked. Please see the White House announcement here.

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Please call: +(54-11) 5777-4354

Outside of Office Hours, contact: +(54-11) 5777-4354

Outside of Argentina: +(54-11) 5777-4354

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Fuera del Argentina: +(54-11) 5777-4354

Caution October 19, 2023

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Travel Advisory August 18, 2023

Argentina - level 1: exercise normal precautions.

Reissued with updates to crime information.

Exercise normal precautions in Argentina. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • City of Rosario (Santa Fe province) due to crime .

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Argentina.

If you decide to travel to Argentina: 

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the Country Security Report for Argentina.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.   

City of Rosario – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal and narcotics trafficking elements are active in Rosario (Santa Fe province) resulting in increased crime and violence.

U.S. Embassy personnel are required to give advance notice before traveling to Rosario.

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Must be valid at time of entry

One page required for entry stamp

Not required for stays of 90 days or less

Up to $10,000 USD or equivalent undeclared for those over age 16; up to $5,000 USD or equivalent undeclared for those under 16

Up to US$10,000 or equivalent undeclared for those over age 16; up to US$5,000 or equivalent undeclared for those under 16

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Av. Colombia 4300 (C1425GMN) Buenos Aires Argentina Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354 Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240 [email protected]

Destination Description

Learn about the U.S. relationship to countries around the world.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Entry/Exit Requirements for U.S. citizens:  U.S. citizens need a valid passport to enter Argentina.  U.S. citizens with expired or damaged passports may not be allowed to enter and could be sent back to the United States at their own expense.  Private U.S. citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to 90 days for tourism or business.  Diplomatic or official passport holders must obtain visas prior to arrival. 

The U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires cannot help travelers with obtaining Brazilian, Paraguayan, or other visas.  U.S. citizens embarking on a cruise ship from Argentina that includes other countries, should verify if they need visas for those countries before boarding the ship.  For more information, see the Country Specific Information for the country you plan to visit. 

Visit the Embassy of Argentina’s website for visa information at https://eeeuu.cancilleria.gob.ar/en .  For information about customs rules, please read our Customs Information page and the Argentine Customs page. 

Special Entry/Exit Requirements for Dual Nationals:  Different rules may apply to dual U.S.-Argentine citizens, depending on when they became U.S. citizens.  Visit the Argentine Immigration website for the most current information.  Generally, Argentine citizens are required to depart Argentina using an Argentine passport, including children of U.S. citizens who may be born in Argentina. 

Special Entry/Exit Requirements for Minors:  A parent or guardian traveling alone with a child under 18 who resides in Argentina must present to Argentine authorities a legalized permission letter in Spanish ( Autorización de Viaje ) from the nonaccompanying parent upon departure from Argentina .  Therefore, either parent may prepare an authorizing letter for the other parent to travel abroad with the child in case of emergency.  (Please see the Argentine immigration website for more information.)  A local notary public (called an  escribano  in Argentina) may prepare the  autorización de viaje  letter.  If this notarized authorization is prepared in the United States, Argentine authorities will require an apostille from the United States in addition to the notarized authorization.  Please see this link for more information about an apostille:   Apostille Requirements (state.gov) For children born in the United States, Argentine Authorities will require the U.S. birth certificate to be apostilled and translated into Spanish by a certified translator. HIV/AIDS Restrictions:  The U.S. Department of State does not know of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for foreign visitors or residents of Argentina. 

More Information:  Find information on dual nationality, prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

Safety and Security

Demonstrations occur frequently in Buenos Aires and take place in other cities as well.  Protesters often block streets and highways.  Demonstrations are usually nonviolent, but always have the potential to turn confrontational.  Avoid demonstrations if possible.

Crime:   Street crime is a problem in most urban areas including Buenos Aires City (San Telmo, La Boca, Retiro, Florida Street), Buenos Aires province, Rosario, and Mendoza. Areas with higher levels of violent crime include Rosario, and the Buenos Aires suburbs of Lomas de Zamora, Quilmes, and Moreno. Look out for muggers, pickpockets, scam artists, cellphone and purse-snatchers who work on the street, in restaurants and hotel lobbies, at bus and train stations, in public transportation, and in cruise ship ports.

Robberies occur often, and violence is more likely to occur when victims resist. Do not leave your personal belongings unattended. Frequent robberies of luggage and handbags occur at Retiro bus station in Buenos Aires and the bus station in Mendoza, and when leaving a handbag in the overhead compartment on the bus.

Robberies involving motorcycles (called “motochorros”) occur frequently in cities. These thieves normally operate in pairs:  one to jump off and take the watches, purses, and backpacks of pedestrians, and another to operate the bike. The motochorros also reach, or break, into cars to snatch valuable items.

Although the La Boca neighborhood is a well-known tourist destination, there have been violent robberies in the daytime as well as nighttime. Stay on the main streets in the tourist zone and use radio taxis to and from the neighborhood.

Avoid “villas” or shanty towns in Buenos Aires, other major cities, and provinces, even if they are in tourist zones.

Scams involving yellow and black taxis have been reported at international airports and around Buenos Aires. Pre-arrange a ride or select one of the flat-rate “remise” services (private car with driver) from the airport service counters. In town, use radio taxis from places like a hotel when possible.  See the  Department of State  and the FBI  Financial Crime I  pages for information on scams.  A few common scenarios follow:

Drivers pretend to help tourists with money while trading good bills for counterfeit ones.

A “handler” at the airport accepts payment for the ride, but then the driver also demands money at the end of the ride.

The taxi “breaks down” on the road, and a second taxi comes to get the passenger.  Both drivers demand payment.

Spraying mustard or another substance on the tourist from a distance.  An accomplice robs the victim while pretending to help clean the stain.

Protestors (‘piqueteros’) sometimes block major roads during large protests and can cause significant traffic delays.

Climbing, Hiking, and Trekking: Do not trek alone.  The U.S. Embassy in Argentina  strongly   discourages  U.S. citizens from hiking alone or even separating from larger traveling parties while on a trail. In recent years, U.S. citizens and other foreigners have disappeared, or been seriously injured while solo climbing/hiking and trekking. Sexual assaults have been reported against solo hikers and bikers on trails in regions along the border with Chile.  Hike in groups and remain alert to your surroundings. Follow Park Ranger and Search and Rescue Team advice and instructions.

Update your SOS or GPS emergency locator information. Make sure your device is enabled to function in the park and your provider has the correct information for authorities. Add local rescue teams as your first emergency contact (see recourses below) and add the U.S. Embassy’s emergency contact phone number as an alternative: +54-11 5777-4354.

Before your trip you can check the following resources for reliable information about trail conditions and potential hazards in the most popular climbing, hiking and trekking regions in Argentina:

·         Mendoza: Mendoza, Aconcagua

·         Bariloche: Club Andino

·         El Chalten: El Chaltén

We strongly recommend that before you travel you purchase supplemental travel and evacuation insurance, provide family or friends with a detailed itinerary prior to climbing, trekking, and hiking, and  Register your itinerary  through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

Please note: The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the entities on the weblink list above. Inclusion on this list is in no way an endorsement by the Department or the U.S. government. The information on the links is provided directly by the local service providers; the Department is not in a position to vouch for such information

Precautions include: Do not place handbags on the back of your chair or on the floor at a restaurant.  Keep them in your lap.

Do not leave your drink unattended.

Do not leave cellphones on tables at restaurants.

Sexual assaults have been reported against solo hikers and bikers on trails in regions along the border with Chile.  Hike in groups and remain alert to your surroundings.

Robberies also occur where victims are grabbed and forced to take out as much money as possible from ATMs.  Family or co-workers are contacted and told to bring all the cash they have on hand or can gather in a couple of hours.  Once the ransom is paid, the victim is usually released unharmed.  There have been some foreign victims of these robberies. Fake telephone kidnappings are also common. Learning important phone numbers and, if robbed, immediately finding a phone and letting family members know you are alright are important steps in stopping this crime.

Travelers should not pack valuables in checked bags.

The U.S. Embassy receives many reports of stolen passports.  Passports and other valuables should be locked in a hotel safe.  Carry a photocopy of your passport with you.  In addition, U.S. citizen residents and visitors should safeguard personal information such as email addresses, telephone numbers, banking and other information, to protect against identity theft.

Victims of Crime:  Report crimes to the local police at the numbers below and contact the  U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires :

Dial 911 to report emergencies, call the police, an ambulance, or the fire department.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

We can: help you find appropriate medical care assist you in reporting a crime to the police contact relatives or friends with your written consent explain the local criminal justice process in general terms provide a list of local attorneys provide information on  victim’s compensation programs in the United States  provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution help you find accommodation and arrange flights home replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.  If you are in immediate danger, call the police at 911.

Tourism:   The tourism industry is unevenly regulated and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur.  Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field.  In the event of an injury, hospitals are able to provide urgent medical treatment, though very serious injuries often require medical evacuation.  U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

  • Dual Nationals : U.S.-Argentine dual nationals may have to follow special rules that apply to Argentine citizens. In some cases, the U.S. government may have trouble providing protection abroad to dual citizens.
  • Foreign Credit Card Usage : On November 3, 2022, the Argentine Central Bank issued a regulation allowing credit card issuers to implement an alternate, more favorable exchange rate for tourists utilizing foreign (i.e., non-Argentine) credit cards. This is a legal, safe method to pay for goods and services in Argentina at a more favorable rate. The regulation does not apply to withdrawals of pesos from ATMs. Please contact your credit card issuer to confirm whether they are implementing this program. For more information on this new regulation, you may read the Argentine Central Bank’s announcement at https://bcra.gob.ar/Pdfs/comytexord/A7630.pdf
  • Currency Exchange and Access :  You must show your passport to exchange money. Keep all receipts related to buying pesos.  Be careful if you are offered illegal exchange rates. and do not exchange money on the street. The Embassy does not exchange money.
  • Some U.S. citizens report problems using their ATM cards issued by U.S. banks at certain ATMs. There is no set list of ATMs or banks where you can use U.S. cards. If your ATM card does not work at one ATM, try another one or use a reputable bank or exchange house. Daily withdrawal limits may also be lower than in the U.S.
  • Hunting and Fishing/Transporting Firearms : If you plan to hunt or fish, follow all gun and game laws. Some U.S. citizens report problems bringing guns into and out of Argentina. More information can be found here .
  • Adventure Travel : For local authorities,Local resources are limited for helping visitors lost or injured in remote areas can be hard. Travelers visiting isolated and wilderness areas mustshould learn about local conditions and give their itinerary to park or police officials.
  • Argentina has the highest mountain outside ofin the HimalayasAmericas, Mount Aconcagua.  Several U.S. citizens, including expert climbers, have died while climbing the mountain.  Rescue missions are often impossible.
  • Antarctica Travel : Many cruises to Antarctica depart from the port of Ushuaia, near the southern tip of Argentina.  The greatest threats to travelers to Antarctica are environmental hazards posed by extreme and unpredictable weather and limited emergency services.  Among the more common threats are frostbite, dehydration, eye damage from reflected glare, overexposure to the sun, and maritime accidents.  There have been accidental deaths on Antarctic cruises due to rough sea conditions, including rogue waves.  For additional information on travel to the Antarctic please see the country Information page for Antarctica: Antarctica International Travel Information (state.gov)

Faith-Based Travelers:  See our following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report   – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report   – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Argentina. 

See   our  LGBTI travel information  page and section 6 of the  Department of State's Human Rights report  for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  People with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different than in the United States.  The law mandates access to buildings for persons with disabilities, but while the federal government has protective laws, many provinces do not.

Students :  See our Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:   See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage . We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. Medical evacuation is extremely costly.

Medications:  If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Argentine Ministry of Health to ensure the medication is legal in Argentina.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription.

Health Concerns:  The following diseases are prevelant either throughout Argentina or in certain areas:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Yellow Fever

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and CDC recommendations for travel to Argentina .

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Driving is more dangerous than in the United States. Drivers in Argentina tend to be aggressive, especially in Buenos Aires, and often ignore traffic regulations. Drivers should prepare in advance when taking long road trips and make sure to have adequate insurance coverage. Gas stations are often far apart and not always easily identified from the main roadway. You need an Argentine or international driver’s license to drive, but verify with local authorities for the most current information.

See our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the websites of Argentina's national tourist office and national roadways office (available only in Spanish).

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Argentina’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Argentina’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page .

MARITIME TRAVEL: Mariners planning travel to Argentina should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts . Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website and the NGA broadcast warnings website  select “broadcast warnings” .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Argentina was cited in the State Department’s 2022 Annual Report to Congress on International Child Abduction for demonstrating a pattern of non-compliance with respect to international parental child abduction. Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in  Argentina.  For additional IPCA-related information, please see the  International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA )  report.

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argentina travel vaccine requirements

Featured on

Argentina Vaccination Requirement: Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina?

The outing to Argentina becomes fun and remarkable when you are therapeutically fit. You can look for immunization-related principles on the iVisa.com site. A thought like, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' may enter your contemplations. To keep yourself shielded from infective conditions, you should get yourself immunized.

Fill me in

How to apply for a travel document with iVisa.com

  • Go to our application webpage to verify if you're qualified for the document.
  • Remember to fill in the application form carefully in case you're eligible.
  • After you complete the form, make sure that your information is correct to avoid mistakes and select a processing speed.
  • Upload and add the documents required for the application form and send it once you're ready.
  • Obtain your document by email inbox.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do i need a vaccine to travel to argentina.

You might need certain vaccines to enter this country, so be aware of that by entering our homepage first and checking the FAQ page to visit Argentina.

Do I need a COVID vaccine or vaccination certificate to enter Argentina?

No, you don’t need a COVID-19 vaccine to enter this country, but you must still fill in the Argentina Affidavit form.

Since information may change quickly, we advise you to follow up on the latest Argentina travel updates and/or contact your local embassy.

Do I need to take a COVID-19 PCR test to enter Argentina?

  • COVID test requirements: There are no testing requirements.

Do I have to quarantine when I get to Argentina?

  • Quarantine requirements: There are no quarantine requirements.

Mention the important documents needed when planning a journey to Argentina

You will require the accompanying records for the Argentina visa application :

  • Credit card/debit card .
  • Email address for receiving updates.

**You will also need:

  • Proof of Valid Visa
  • All passport pages
  • Passport Cover
  • Passport page (if applicable)
  • Expired passport scan **

State all the processing plans available

You can locate the processing plans on iVisa.com site:

  • Standard Processing Time: This plan is available at a very affordable price, USD $274.99 and you will have to wait for 35 days .
  • Rush Processing Time: By taking this plan, you will get your visa at a faster rate 30 days . Yes, the price is higher USD $323.99 than the standard plan, but the perks are better too.
  • Super Rush Processing Time: Buying this plan for USD $392.99 is the quickest way to get your visa 25 days .

Mention the stepwise procedure to apply for the Argentina Visa. Why are vaccine shots necessary to take?

  • Enter your general information in the digital form.
  • Check every detail that you filled in.
  • Mention your email address on which you will receive the updates.

Regarding your thoughts on, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' , Yes, you do need vaccine shots before traveling to Argentina. The reason being, you will be checked for vaccinations when you land, and to ensure that you are not a carrier of any disease, vaccine shots are necessary.

Is this a safe way to apply for Argentina Visa? Will I be asked for evidence of being vaccinated on reaching Argentina?

This organization longs for customer trust and satisfaction. And that is why this method to apply for an Argentina visa is the most secure. If you are stressing over, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' , you should be aware that vaccinations are a must for travelers visiting foreign countries. Therefore, yes you will be checked for vaccination on reaching Argentina.

Why are vaccinations so important when going on a trip to a foreign country?

If you plan on visiting a foreign country and think, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' . The answer is, yes, you do. The explanation being, you can be the transporter of infections from your local nation, and you can take up illnesses from the nation you are visiting. This will bring about spreading a pestilence between the two countries. That is the reason it is important to do full research concerning the infections, get immunized, and afterward visit another nation.

What are the names of the two official bodies that propose the vaccinations for travelers?

You might think, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' and you ought to understand that the CDC and WHO are the regarded and official bodies that propose vaccinations for various risky ailments that an individual should get.

For which diseases do I need to get vaccine shots before visiting Argentina?

You may get thoughts like, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' . So, you should consider essentially all the diseases for which you require vaccinations. These are, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid, yellow fever, rabies, meningitis, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR), Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), chickenpox, shingles, pneumonia, and influenza.

Which site do I need to refer to if I wish to read more about the vaccinations needed?

Your all questions on 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina' will be resolved when you will refer to the iVisa.com website.

iVisa.com recommends

Argentina is an appealing place overflowing with a rich, various culture. From tropical, bright northern urban communities skiing in the south, Argentina offers an assortment of alternatives for any explorer's longings. The Iguazú Falls line the boundary of Argentina and Brazil and are among probably the biggest cascade frameworks on the planet. Sightseers can likewise go to blanketed Ushuaia, which is viewed as the most southern city on the planet.

This large South American country is famous for its full terrain that includes the Andes mountains, glacial lakes, and grasslands in the Pampas, the traditional grazing land for its famous cattle. The country is also known for the dance and music of tango. Its great cosmopolitan capital, Buenos Aires, is centered on the Plaza de Mayo, surrounded by imposing 19th-century buildings, such as the Casa Rosada, the iconic presidential palace.

We invite you to explore it at any time but don't forget to get the Health Declaration first.

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Passport Health logo

Travel Vaccines and Advice for Argentina

Passport Health offers a variety of options for travelers throughout the world.

Argentina is an alluring destination brimming with a rich, diverse culture. From tropical, sunny northern cities to snow and skiing in the south, Argentina offers a variety of options for any traveler’s desires.

Buenos Aires, the nation’s capital, is a lively, invigorating city that immerses travelers in the culture and history of Argentina. At the heart of the capital is the Plaza de Mayo, filled with preserved Spanish and European style buildings from the 19th century.

The Iguazú Falls line the border of Argentina and Brazil, and are among some of the largest waterfall systems in the world. The Iguazú National Park in Argentina is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

If you’re looking to feel a chill, then you can still find what you seek in one of Argentina’s many ski resorts. Tourists can also head to snowy Ushuaia, which is considered the most southern city in the world.

Do I Need Vaccines for Argentina?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Argentina. The CDC and WHO recommend the following vaccinations for Argentina: hepatitis A , hepatitis B , typhoid , yellow fever , rabies , meningitis , polio , measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) , Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) , chickenpox , shingles , pneumonia and influenza .

COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for travel to all regions, both foreign and domestic. Check with your local Passport Health clinic if immunization is offered in your area.

See the bullets below to learn more about some of these key immunizations:

  • COVID-19 – Airborne & Direct Contact – Recommended for all unvaccinated individuals who qualify for vaccination
  • Hepatitis A – Food & Water – Recommended for most travelers
  • Hepatitis B – Blood & Body Fluids – Recommended for travelers to most regions.
  • Typhoid – Food & Water – Recommended for travelers to most regions.
  • Yellow Fever – Mosquito – Recommended for travel to Corrientes and Misiones provinces. May be recommended for Formosa, Chaco, Jujuy and Salta.
  • Rabies – Saliva of Infected Animals – High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-term travelers and those who may come in contact with animals.
  • Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) – Various Vectors – Given to anyone unvaccinated and/or born after 1957. One time adult booster recommended.
  • TDAP (Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis) – Wounds & Airborne – Only one adult booster of pertussis required.
  • Chickenpox – Direct Contact & Airborne – Given to those unvaccinated that did not have chickenpox.
  • Shingles – Direct Contact – Vaccine can still be given if you have had shingles.
  • Pneumonia – Airborne – Two vaccines given separately. All 65+ or immunocompromised should receive both.
  • Influenza – Airborne – Vaccine components change annually.
  • Meningitis – Airborne & Direct Contact – Given to anyone unvaccinated or at an increased risk, especially students.
  • Polio – Food & Water – Considered a routine vaccination for most travel itineraries. Single adult booster recommended.

See the tables below for more information:

Yellow fever vaccination is recommended for some travelers to Argentina, based on their itinerary. Consult with a travel health specialist to learn if you’ll need one for your trip.

There is a risk of contracting the Zika virus in Argentina. Zika cases are present in the provinces of Chaco, Formosa, Salta, and Tucuman. All travelers are at risk, especially women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. Taking steps to prevent insect bites, such as using DEET-based repellents can lower your risk.

For more information on any of the vaccines above, visit Passport Health’s detailed specialty vaccination pages or make an appointment with your local Travel Medicine Specialist . To make your appointment, call or booking online now .

Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Argentina?

Americans planning to go to Argentina do not need a visa for tourism or business visits that do not exceed 90 days. The reciprocity fee for travelers from the U.S. has also been suspended, meaning you do not have to pay. But, you do still need a valid passport to gain entry into Argentina.

Sources: Embassy of Argentina and U.S. State Department

What Is the Climate Like in Argentina?

The climate in Argentina is diverse, ranging from tropical to polar. Precipitation is generally light to moderate throughout most of Argentina. Here is what to expect in a few diverse tourist destinations:

  • Buenos Aires – The capital city has a moderate temperature, similar to cities in the southeastern United States. Winters are mild, while the summers get quite humid and hot. Buenos Aires rarely sees snow.
  • Ushuaia – The capital of Tierra del Fuego is one of the colder regions in Argentina. This area experiences a mild tundra climate. It is also very humid and experiences frequent rain, sleet and snow in the winter months.
  • Iguazú Falls – The climate along the Iguazú River and the Misiones Province is humid subtropical. The temperatures stay high all year. The chance of precipitation near the Iguazú Falls is high. The rainy season is from January to March.

Is It Safe to Travel to Argentina?

There is criminal activity in Argentina, particularly in bigger cities.

The U.S. Department of State reports frequent scams involving black and yellow taxis at airports in Buenos Aires. Some of these scams include pretending to help tourists with their money while secretly exchanging their bills for counterfeits. When flying into Argentina, pre-arrange your ride from the airport using flat-rate “remise” services. When in town, always arrange for your taxi from secure locations such as hotels.

There is also a concern about “express kidnappings”. Victims are kidnapped and forced to withdraw as much money as they can from ATMs. Family, friends or coworkers are contacted and demanded to bring a ransom or as much money as possible. The victim is usually released once the ransom is paid. Some of these victims have included foreigners.

Street crime is a general problem. Common criminals include muggers, scam artists, pickpockets and purse-snatches. It is important to keep your guard up when in hotel lobbies, restaurants, at public transportation locations and on the street.

The U.S. Embassy reports many cases of stolen passports. Keep your passport and any valuables in a hotel safe and keep a photocopy of your passport on your person.

Extreme Sporting in Argentina

Avoid mosquitoes and other bugs, insect-borne disease are a threat throughout the world., keep the bugs away with passport health’s repellent options .

With abundant nature and sprawling, snowy mountains, Argentina is the perfect destination to try out extreme sports. Tourists can enjoy skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, diving, rafting, mountaineering and more.

But, while Argentina is the perfect paradise for these unique sports, it is still important to exercise caution before speeding down mountains or jumping into unknown waters.

Research all excursions to ensure that you know exactly what you are getting yourself into or if you are even capable of participating. This will prevent unwanted injury while you are abroad. Going with a reputable vendor or guide is extremely important as well.

What Should I Take to Argentina?

In addition to all travel documents and medications recommended by a Passport Health Travel Medicine Specialist, here are some items to consider packing:

  • Insect Repellent – Many viruses and potential illnesses in Argentina, including Zika, come from mosquitoes or other insects. Packing a repellent with at least 20%-30% DEET will help keep those infecting pests away. Also consider packing neutral-colored and loose-fitting clothing that covers your arms and legs.
  • Motion Sickness Medicine – If you are planning to travel, you may have to take buses over bumpy roads or even boats over choppy waters. Having medication on-hand will help you avoid any discomfort, headaches or nausea.
  • Insect Repellent – Mosquitoes feast at night. Apply repellent whether you’re planning to go out on the town, or stay close to your lodging especially during wet seasons.
  • Sunscreen – The best way to protect your skin’s health and prevent sunburn is to apply sunscreen. While it may not seem necessary in certain regions or if it is raining, skin damage can still occur.
  • Varied Clothing – You will need a variety of clothing to deal with the wide range of the temperatures you will face. While wearing shorts and a t-shirt may be comfortable in Buenos Aires, you may need a jacket if you go to areas such as Patagonia or Ushuaia. Bring an umbrella, as rain is common in some parts of the country.
  • Feminine Products – If you are a female traveler, make sure you pack enough sanitary napkins and tampons. Many bloggers and travelers have reported difficulty finding and buying feminine care products throughout parts of South America, particularly in Argentina.

U.S. Embassy in Argentina

All Americans visiting Argentina should register with the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires. This will inform the office of your travel plans and will allow them to reach out in the case of an emergency or evacuation. You can register online, through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program . If you plan to buy a local SIM card you can also enter your phone number to receive SMS updates from the office.

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires Av. Colombia 4300 (C1425GMN) Buenos Aires Argentina Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354 Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240 Email: [email protected]

Visit the U.S. Embassy website before leaving to confirm correct contact details for the U.S. Embassy in Argentina.

The embassy also offers an emergency contact line for U.S. citizens. If you have an emergency, you can call the ACS Emergency Line at (54-11) 5777-4354 while in Argentina.

If you have any questions or concerns about traveling to Argentina or are wondering what shots you may need for your trip, schedule an appointment with your local Passport Health travel medicine clinic or call us at or booking online today.

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On This Page: Do I Need Vaccines for Argentina? Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Argentina? What Is the Climate Like in Argentina? Is It Safe to Travel to Argentina? Extreme Sporting in Argentina What Should I Take to Argentina? U.S. Embassy in Argentina

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argentina travel vaccine requirements

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Exercise normal safety precautions in Argentina.

Higher levels apply in some areas.

Argentina

Argentina (PDF 506.24 KB)

Americas (PDF 3.25 MB)

Local emergency contacts

Fire and rescue services.

Call 911, for English language service in Buenos Aires only.

Medical emergencies

Call 0800 999 5000, for multilingual tourist police.

Advice levels

Exercise a high degree of caution in Rosario.

Exercise a high degree of caution in Rosario due to the threat of crime and violence.

  • Petty crime, including robbery and bag snatching, is common. Take care on public transport and in tourist areas or crowded places. Thefts and robberies in Buenos Aires and other major cities are increasing. Popular tourist areas such as La Boca are hotspots for robberies and theft. Always keep personal belongings, including mobile phones, close to you or out of sight. Don't leave wallets or mobile phones on tables in restaurants, especially if you're seated on sidewalks.
  • Exercise a high degree of caution in the city of Rosario due to higher levels of crime and violence.
  • Violent crimes are common in Buenos Aires, Rosario and Mendoza tourist areas. These include armed robbery and express kidnapping. Only use ATMs in banks and shopping centres and try to avoid them after dark. If you're held up, don't resist.
  • Thieves often target cars stopped at traffic lights. Crime also occurs in taxis. Keep doors and windows locked when driving.
  • Protests, demonstrations and other disruptions may occur anytime. Peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. Avoid large public gatherings.

Full travel advice:  Safety

  • Insect-borne diseases are common in the north of Argentina and as far south as Buenos Aires. These include dengue, chikungunya and zika virus. If you're pregnant, discuss your travel plans with your doctor before you leave. Ensure your accommodation is insect-proof. Use insect repellent.
  • Yellow fever is a risk in Misiones and Corrientes. If you're travelling there, get vaccinated before you leave Australia. 
  • Hantavirus is widespread in some regions. It's spread through contact with infected rodents. Avoid contact with live or dead rodents, nests, burrows and droppings.

Full travel advice:  Health

  • Don't use or carry illegal drugs. Penalties for drug offences are severe and include lengthy prison sentences.
  • Dual nationals staying in Argentina for more than 180 days must leave Argentina on an Argentine passport. Make sure you have one before you travel. The Australian embassy can't help you get one.
  • Children born in Argentina to Australian parents are Argentine nationals and must leave Argentina for the first time on an Argentine passport. Children travelling alone or with only one parent or legal guardian require a travel authorisation from the non-accompanying parent/s or legal guardian/s to leave the country. When travelling with both parents, travellers must be able to prove they are the parents or legal guardians (birth certificate or custody documents).

Full travel advice:  Local laws

  • Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. You should contact the nearest embassy or consulate of Argentina for the latest details.
  • You can stay as a tourist for up to 90 days without a visa, but you'll need a return or onward ticket, a valid passport and travel/medical insurance. 

Full travel advice:  Travel

Local contacts

  • The  Consular Services Charter  details what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.
  • For consular assistance, contact the  Australian Embassy in Buenos Aires .
  • To stay up to date with local information follow the Embassy’s social media accounts.

Full travel advice:  Local contacts

Full advice

Crime rates are higher than in Australia. Thefts and robberies are common, especially in Buenos Aires city and metropolitan area, as well as other major cities. You should keep cash and expensive items such as mobile phones, wallets and jewellery out of sight in public areas. Avoid lower socioeconomic urban areas where crime is more likely to occur, and foreigners could be targeted. Avoid empty streets, especially after dark.

You should exercise a high degree of caution in the city of Rosario due to higher levels of crime and violence.

Petty crime

Petty crime, including pickpocketing, bag/jewellery snatching and bag slashing, is common, even during the day. Thieves also target mobile phones, especially smartphones. 

Take care on public transport and in busy pedestrian zones and tourist areas.

Distraction thefts are common in public areas, such as:

  • train and bus stations
  • outside and inside hotels
  • restaurants and cafes
  • subways, trains or buses

This can involve creating a distraction by, for example, helping remove sauce that they spilt on you while their accomplice steals your possessions while you are distracted. 

Robberies  are frequent in and around bus stations, especially at:

  • Retiro bus and train station in Buenos Aires
  • Central bus station in Mendoza

Criminals might use force if you resist.

Robberies involving motorcycles, 'motochorros', are common in larger cities. Thieves usually work in pairs:

  • one person operates the motorbike
  • one jumps off and steals belongings from pedestrians

They'll also snatch items from inside vehicles.

Robberies are common in taxis.

Robbery and theft hotspots in tourist areas of Buenos Aires include:

  • Downtown (Micro Centro)
  • Calle Florida (Florida Street)
  • Buenos Aires ferry terminal
  • Around the main train and bus stations

Violent crime

Armed robbery and other violent crimes are a problem in major tourist areas of:

  • Buenos Aires

To reduce your risk of crime:

  • stay within the tourist precinct in La Boca but avoid the area after dark. You should arrange your transport directly to and from the La Boca tourist area. Walking to La Boca isn't recommended
  • be cautious in other tourist areas of Buenos Aires
  • avoid using your mobile phone in the street
  • always keep your personal belongings close and out of sight
  • keep your purse or backpack containing valuables close to you and within sight. Do not hang bags and purses on chairs. It's better to keep them on your lap or between your feet.
  • only use ATMs in banks and shopping centres. Avoid using them after dark.
  • lock your passport and other valuables in a hotel safe
  • carry a copy of your passport as ID

Spiked foods and drinks and online dating apps

  • Never leave your food or drinks unattended and do not accept them from strangers, especially at night clubs. There have been reports of foreign tourists being drugged and robbed of their belongings.
  • Be aware of the risk of bringing new acquaintances into your accommodation.

Express kidnappings can occur in Buenos Aires. 

Express kidnapping is where criminals demand a quick pay-off. They force victims to withdraw funds from ATMs or to make an electronic bank transfer to secure their release.

Kidnappers tend to target locals asking for ransom from families or co-workers. However, they may target tourists. The victim is usually unharmed.

The Australian Government's longstanding policy is that it doesn't make payments or concessions to kidnappers.

More information:

Road-based crime

Crimes against car passengers are a problem. Thieves often target cars stopped at traffic lights.

Some criminals pose as taxi operators at the airport and rob passengers. They may work with other taxi drivers.

To reduce your risks while taking taxis or driving:

  • consider calling a radio taxi or remise, or using a ride-hailing app which keeps a record of drivers
  • avoid sharing taxis with strangers
  • keep car windows closed, doors locked at all times and keep valuables out of sight
  • do not leave valuables in your car, including in the boot.

If you're held up, don't resist.

Cyber security 

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you’re connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers, or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions, or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

Cyber security when travelling overseas

Civil unrest and political tension

Demonstrations and protest

Protests and demonstrations are common in Argentina. Particularly in:

  • other major cities

Since June 2023, there have been many roadblocks and protests in the province of Jujuy in northern Argentina, including in rural areas and tourist routes. Some of these have turned violent. 

Organised strikes are frequent and may disrupt transport systems, including trains and airlines. Contact your travel or tour operator for information.

Focal points for protesters in Buenos Aires are the areas of:

  • Plaza De Mayo
  • Avenida 9 de Julio

During demonstrations, streets may be blocked, and public transport disrupted.

Public protests and events that draw large groups of people can turn violent. 

To protect yourself during periods of unrest: 

  • avoid protests and demonstrations
  • if you're caught in protests or demonstrations, you should leave as soon as you can 
  • monitor the local media for updates
  • follow the advice of local authorities

Football matches can sometimes turn violent. Make sure the stadium is in a safe area of the city and monitor local media to know if violence is expected to occur. 

  • Demonstrations and civil unrest

Road safety

Pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers should be careful in Argentina. Car accidents are much more common in Argentina than in Australia due to:

  • vehicles, particularly buses, frequently drive through red traffic lights.
  • vehicles do not give way to pedestrians at pedestrian crossings and one-way signs are often ignored. Always look both ways and make sure vehicles are stopping for you before crossing a street.
  • Be careful of motorbikes going through gaps in the traffic, including at blind spots at pedestrian crossings.
  • drivers may make sudden and unexpected manoeuvres. Pay close attention to the traffic around you.
  • right of way is frequently ignored
  • aggressive driving and speeding are common

You're more likely to die in a car accident in Argentina than in Australia.

  • Driving or riding

Bomb attacks have occurred in Argentina.

To protect yourself from terrorism: 

  • always be alert
  • follow the instructions of local authorities
  • monitor the media for potential threats

Terrorism is a threat worldwide.

Climate and natural disasters

Argentina experiences  natural disasters  and  severe weather , including:

  • volcanic activity
  • earthquakes
  • dust storms

Land border crossings can close due to earthquakes, landslides, or severe weather conditions, including heavy snowfalls. The land border with Chile is particularly prone to closures due to severe weather conditions, especially during winter months. You can check the status of all land border crossings  here . 

If there's a natural disaster:

  • know your hotel's evacuation plans
  • always carry your passport in a waterproof bag
  • keep in touch with family and friends
  • check the media and other local sources for information
  • Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System
  • VAAC Buenos Aires 

Volcanos and earthquakes

Volcanos  on the border of Argentina and Chile could erupt at any time.

Earthquakes  can also occur, particularly in those provinces bordering the Andes.

Flooding  is seasonal. It's more common in the northern provinces of Argentina. Flooding may disrupt local transport and essential services.

Heavy rains may cause occasional flash floods in other areas, including the province of Buenos Aires.

province of Buenos Aires.

Bushfires can occur throughout the year in different parts of the country.

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive  travel insurance  before you leave.

Your travel or medical insurance policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including hospital admission and medical evacuation. The Australian Government won’t pay for these costs. 

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are.

If you're not insured, you may have to pay many thousands of dollars up-front for medical care.

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you’ll be away

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. 

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health
  • plan any vaccinations you need

Do this at least 8 weeks before you leave.

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare, or the welfare of another Australian, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Medications

Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor.

You may not be able to access your usual medication in Argentina. Some local alternatives:

  • don't meet Australian standards
  • may have adverse effects

If you plan to bring medication, check if it's legal in Argentina. Take enough legal medicine for your trip.

Carry a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medication is
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for personal use

Health risks

Insect-borne diseases

Diseases spread by insects are a risk in Argentina. This includes:

  • yellow fever
  • chikungunya
  • Zika virus  (regional)

These diseases are serious and can be fatal.

Outbreaks can happen throughout the year and as far south as Buenos Aires, particularly when there is warm weather combined with rainfall. There is currently a dengue outbreak in Northern Argentina, including Buenos Aires.

Yellow fever is a potentially fatal virus spread by mosquitoes. It's prevented by vaccination. Get vaccinated before you travel.

US CDC  recommends yellow fever vaccinations for all travellers going to Corrientes and Misiones provinces.

Zika virus is a risk in the northern areas of Argentina. This includes Tucuman Province.

Pregnant women and their unborn babies are particularly at risk. If you're pregnant:

  • discuss any travel plans with your doctor
  • defer non-essential travel to affected areas
  • avoid travel to areas affected by zika

To protect yourself against diseases spread by insects:

  • make sure your accommodation is insect-proof
  • use insect repellent
  • wear long, loose, light-coloured clothing
  • consider taking medication to prevent malaria
  • Infectious diseases

Infected rodents spread  hantavirus pulmonary syndrome . It's widespread in:

  • northern regions of the provinces of Salta and Jujuy
  • central regions of the provinces of Buenos Aires, Santa Fe, and Entre Rios
  • the northeast region of the province of Misiones
  • southern regions of the provinces of Neuquen, Rio Negro and Chubut

To protect yourself from hantavirus infection:

  • avoid contact with live or dead rodents, burrows or nests
  • avoid places where dust is raised, such as from sweeping and vacuuming their droppings
  • choose a campsite that is open and dry
  • don't rest in tall grasses or haystacks
  • remove food sources that may attract rodents

Altitude sickness

If you travel to an area higher than 2500m, you can develop altitude sickness.

Altitude sickness can be deadly. It can affect anyone, even if you're physically fit.

Your risk of altitude sickness increases if you:

  • ascend too quickly
  • have had altitude sickness before
  • exercise or drink alcohol before you can adjust to the altitude
  • have health problems that affect breathing

If you'll be travelling above 2500m:

  • seek advice from your doctor before you travel
  • obtain travel insurance that covers mountain rescue

Air pollution

Buenos Aires has high levels of air pollution. This may aggravate:

  • bronchial conditions
  • sinus conditions

Other health risks

Outbreaks of waterborne, foodborne, parasitic and other infectious diseases occur. This includes:

  • tuberculosis

To reduce your risk of illness:

  • boil drinking water or drink bottled water in rural areas
  • avoid ice cubes
  • avoid raw and undercooked food, such as salads
  • avoid contact with dogs and other mammals

If you're bitten or scratched by an animal, get medical help straight away.

Get urgent medical advice if you suspect food poisoning or have a fever or diarrhoea.

There have been occasional measles outbreaks in Argentina, most recently in 2020.

Medical care

Medical facilities.

Most medical facilities are of a reasonable standard.

You may need to pay cash before private medical clinics will treat you. This includes for emergency care.

You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our  Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.

Penalties for drug offences are severe, even for small amounts, and include long prison terms.

  • Carrying or using drugs

Offences committed against national symbols carry a penalty of 6 months to 4 years in jail.

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

  • Staying within the law and respecting customs

Dual citizenship

Dual nationals staying in Argentina for more than 180 days must leave Argentina on an Argentine passport.

Applying for an Argentine passport can take time. You must present documents proving your identity. If you're an Australian resident, you may have to provide proof of your address in Australia.

The Australian Embassy can't help you apply for an Argentine passport or other identity documents.

A child born in Argentina to Australian parents is an Argentine national. They must use an Argentine passport when they leave the country.

  • Dual nationals

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact an  embassy or consulate of Argentina  for details about visas, currency and customs regulations.

Visa-free travel for short stays

As a tourist, you can stay for up to 90 days without a visa, but you'll need evidence that you intend to depart the country within the 90 days, for example:

  • a return or onward ticket
  • a valid passport
  • travel/medical insurance

Officials may also ask for proof of accommodation and evidence that you have enough money or a credit card to cover your trip.

If you are travelling on a passport other than a regular passport (for example, official, diplomatic or emergency) and/or for a reason other than tourism, you may require a visa. Please contact the nearest Argentine Consulate/Embassy for further information and to apply for a visa.

Visas aren't available on arrival. You must obtain your visa before you travel.

Entry into Argentina

Biometric entry procedures are in place at:

  • Ezeiza International Airport
  • Jorge Newbery International Airport

On arrival at these ports, authorities will:

  • scan your thumbprints with an inkless device
  • take a digital photo of you

Travelling with children

Children younger than 18 may need to provide an authorisation or a letter of consent from the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) who aren't travelling with them.

Children younger than 18 who normally reside in Argentina or have resided in the country for 1 year or more need legal authorisation from the non-accompanying parent(s) to leave the country if travelling alone or with only 1 parent or legal guardian.

When a child is travelling with both parents, you may be required to prove you're the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) (birth certificate, court documents).

Children younger than 13 must have a translated and apostilled authorisation to enter the country if 1 or both parents and/or legal guardian(s) are not travelling with them.

For more information, visit Argentina’s Immigration website for instructions  on travelling with minors .

You should contact the  nearest Argentine Embassy or Consulate  for guidance.

  • Advice for people travelling with children

Travel via the United States

If you're travelling through the US, you must meet US entry or transit requirements.

Check your visa needs well before you travel. Contact the nearest  embassy or consulate of the United States .

Travel via Chile

If you’re travelling via Chile , ensure you meet all current entry or transit requirements.

  • Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA)
  • Department of Homeland Security

Travelling to Chile from Argentina

Please see our Travel Advice for Chile . Australians need a visa to enter Chile. To learn about Chile’s visa requirements please visit the Chilean Government’s website.

Yellow fever vaccination

You may need a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate to enter Argentina. Some airlines may want to see one when you leave.

Find out about returning to Australia  after exposure to yellow fever .

  • International health and travel

Some countries won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for 6 months after you plan to leave that country. This can apply even if you're just transiting or stopping over.

Some foreign governments and airlines apply the rule inconsistently. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

You can end up stranded if your passport is not valid for more than 6 months.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid for long enough, consider getting a new passport.

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible.

  • In Australia, contact the  Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest  Australian embassy or consulate .

Passport with ‘X’ gender identifier

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can’t guarantee that a passport showing 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the nearest  embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

  • LGBTI travellers

The Peso (ARS) is the official currency of Argentina.

Most major hotels in Buenos Aires will exchange US dollars. They may not accept traveller's cheques.

Credit cards are widely accepted.

To make access to money easier:

  • carry a photocopy of the identity page of your passport, if you plan to use credit cards
  • check local sources for advice on buying foreign currency

Don't exchange money on the street or with someone offering exchange services on the street as you may receive counterfeit pesos.

Local travel

Be prepared if you're hiking or climbing in high country or mountains.

To reduce your risks if you intend to hike in Argentina:

  • register your details with local park authorities
  • give details of your plans and contact details to family or close friends
  • research the area you plan to visit, including any natural hazards
  • monitor local media for weather advice
  • carry emergency and first aid equipment with you
  • wear proper clothing and take with you the necessary equipment for the activity. In mountainous areas and in Patagonia the weather can change abruptly.
  • stay on marked trails
  • Going overseas for sports and adventure

Iguazu Falls

Make sure you can cross and return according to the rules of the day before attempting to do so.

Ensure your passport is valid for at least 6 months from the date you enter Brazil.

See the  Brazilian Government’s website to learn about entry and visa requirements for Australian citizens

Be cautious in the tri-border area as crime can occur. Avoid crossing the borders after dark.

  • Travel advice for Brazil
  • Brazilian Consulate in Buenos Aires
  • Brazilian Vice-Consulate in Puerto Iguazu

Driving permit

You can use your Australian driver's licence while you have a valid visa. You should check with the rental car company whether you also need to have an international driver permit. You may need to present further identification.

Residents must get an Argentine driver's licence.

Drivers must be aged 23 years or older to hire a car.

Rail travel

Petty crime is common in trains and subways and in railway stations. See Safety .

When travelling on public transportation you should carry your backpack or purse on your chest, not on your back.

It is more secure to book radio taxis and 'remises' (chauffeured cars):

  • by telephone
  • at the airport arrivals hall
  • on official mobile apps

To reduce your risks if you take a taxi:

  • book taxis in advance rather than hailing from the street
  • use ride-hailing apps which maintain a record of the driver and the route and often don't require a cash transaction
  • don't share with strangers
  • keep doors and windows locked and valuables out of sight.

Overbooking on domestic flights and technical problems at the airport can result in:

  • significant delays
  • missed connections

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check  Argentina's air safety profile  with the Aviation Safety Network.

If you're flying within Argentina, monitor local media for airport updates.

Buenos Aires and Ushuaia are popular destinations for several international cruise lines, including for travel to Antarctica.

For your safety, if you intend to take a cruise:

  • check the onboard medical facilities meet your needs
  • know the costs of medical treatment onboard
  • get enough travel insurance, including cover for pre-existing conditions and medical evacuation
  • Going on a cruise

Accessibility

People with disabilities may have trouble with accessibility and accommodation in Argentina. 

Federal laws mandate access to buildings for people with disabilities, but these may not be fully applied. Many provinces don't have similar laws.

  • Disabilities

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

Call 911 (English language service in the city of Buenos Aires only)

Tourist police stations, or Comisaria del Turista (where there are English-speaking officers), are in:

  • Buenos Aires Corrientes 436, call 4(+54 9 11) 5050 9260 or (+54 9 11) 5050 3293
  • Mendoza, San Martin 1143, call (+54 261) 4132135

Always get a police report when you report a crime.

Your insurer should have a 24-hour emergency number.

Consular contacts

Read the  Consular Services Charter  for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

You can contact the Australian Embassy in Buenos Aires.

Australian Embassy, Buenos Aires

Villanueva 1400

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Phone: (+54 11) 4779 3500

Fax: (+54 11) 4779 3581

Website:  argentina.embassy.gov.au

Facebook:  Australia en Argentina, Uruguay y Paraguay

Instagram:  ausemb_ar

Twitter:  @EmbAustraliaBA

Check the Embassy for details about opening hours and any temporary closures.

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

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Vaccinations for Argentina

Health risks disclaimer.

The following information is intended as a guide only and is not intended to replace professional medical advice.

We, at Sonic HealthPlus, trading as Travelvax and our related companies, cannot guarantee that the following information is complete, up-to-date, accurate or error free. You therefore view the following information at your own risk.

You should obtain specific travel health advice in relation to your individual needs and your intended travel, including advice on vaccinations, anti-malarial and other medications based on your past vaccination history, your present medical condition and your intended itinerary.

Our staff at travelvax.com.au are trained in the medical travel health area and are able to advise you on your specific individual needs. Please feel free to contact us on 1300 360 164 for assistance.

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About Argentina Vaccinations

Bordered by Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Brazil and Paraguay, Argentina is South America's second largest country, occupying most of the continent's southern portion between the Andes Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean. Except for the subtropical northern tip, Argentina's mainly temperate climate varies from region to region. In the south, the climate in the Patagonian-Fuegian Steppe region ranges from moderate to cold and dry; further north Monte is also dry but warmer, with no discernable winter; the Pampas region's rainfall ranges from 50cm in the west to 100cm in the east, with cool winters and summer humidity; tropical Chaco in the north has annual rainfall of up to 150cm and summer temperatures to 49c. 

Travel Health Alerts

Argentina's western equine encephalitis cases rise, rare case of human western equine encephalitis infection, pork products linked to several outbreaks, chikungunya, dengue update, vaccine preventable diseases, yellow fever.

Disease present. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers aged 9 months and over going to Corrientes and Misiones Provinces.

Vaccination generally not recommended(1) for travellers going to Formosa Province and designated areas of Chaco, Jujuy and Salta Provinces.

Not recommended for travellers whose itineraries are limited to areas and provinces not listed above.

(1) Yellow fever vaccination is generally not recommended in areas where there is low potential for exposure to yellow fever virus. However, vaccination might be considered for a small subset of travellers to these areas, who are at increased risk of exposure to yellow fever virus (e.g. prolonged travel, extensive exposure to mosquitoes, inability to avoid mosquito bites). When considering vaccination, any traveller must take into account the risk of being infected with yellow fever virus, country entry requirements, as well as individual risk factors (e.g. age, immune status) for serious vaccine-associated adverse events.

Travelvax note:  We advise that this information is discussed with a yellow fever licenced practitioner.

Travelvax has doctors who are yellow fever vaccination-accredited. Click here to learn more about Yellow Fever.

For the most up to date requirements for entry into Australia, go to Smartraveller .

Please click this COVID-19 Travel Regulations Map (IATA) to view the latest Argentina COVID travel requirements.

Hepatitis A

Moderate risk to travellers, vaccination recommended. Click here to learn more about the Hepatitis A vaccination.

Hepatitis B

Low presence of Hepatitis B in local population, discuss whether vaccination would be recommended with a medical practitioner . Vaccination is recommended for specific high-risk travellers (sport/adventure/occupational/sexual). Consult a medical practitioner for your specific risk. Click here to learn more about the Hepatitis B vaccination.

Moderate risk for most travellers. Vaccination recommended for travel to smaller cities, villages and rural areas outside usual tourist routes. Some medical conditions pre-dispose to infection; whether vaccinations would be recommended should be discussed with a medical practitioner. Consult a medical practitioner for your specific risk. To learn more about Typhoid and the available vaccinations, click here .

Southern hemisphere winter risk (May to October). Most common vaccine preventable illness in travellers. Vaccine recommended, effective for 1 year. To learn more about the Influenza virus, click here .

Disease present. Recommendation for vaccination will depend on specific itinerary and activities planned. Generally rabies vaccination is advised for high risk individuals such as veterinarians or animal handlers, cavers. Additionally for higher risk travellers who plan: extended periods outdoors, rural travel, adventurous activities including bicycling; also expats or long-term travellers to endemic regions and children (risk of more severe or risk-prone bites and may not report contact at all). Click here to learn more about rabies.

Japanese Encephalitis

No risk to travellers.

Tickborne Encephalitis

Meningococcal meningitis.

Low risk to travellers.

Other Diseases

Travellers diarrhoea.

Moderate risk. Travellers' Diarrhoea affects 20-60% of overseas travellers, food and water precautions are essential. Self-treatment medications may be recommended. Click here to learn more about the common symptoms and ways to prevent getting Travellers' Diarrhoea.

Insect-borne Diseases

Diseases such as Dengue , Chikungunya , Zika may be present. Seasonal risk will vary by country. Whether preventive measures will be recommended will depend on itinerary, length of stay, type of travel etc. and needs to be discussed with a medical practitioner. For those countries with disease present, risk is highest in urban and semi-urban areas, but may also occur in rural areas; insect avoidance measures are highly recommended all year round. Travelvax believes that the best defence is to understand their habits, dress properly and use an effective insect repellent in the correct manner. Consult a medical practitioner for your specific risk.

Schistosomiasis

Altitude illness is a risk to travellers ascending higher than 2000 meters. Preventative medication is available. Consult a medical practitioner if ascending to 2000 metres or above. Click here to learn more about Altitude illness.

Additional Information

Personal safety.

In order to check before and during travel for any high-risk areas visit the Smartraveller website. Avoid unnecessary displays of wealth or valuables and minimise the amounts of cash carried. Keep secure records of passport/credit card/licence numbers. For more safety tips visit: www.smartraveller.gov.au .

Medical Care

Comprehensive medical facilities accessible throughout the country. Check for any contacts supplied by your emergency assistance organisation (nominated by your travel insurer) or with IAMAT (International Association of Medical Assistance for Travellers).

First Aid Kits & Accessories

Carry a basic first aid kit , customised to your activities. For longer stays consider a needle and syringe pack and medication for travellers diarrhoea.

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Travel safely to Argentina with Passport Health's travel vaccinations and advice.

Travel Vaccines and Advice for Argentina

Passport Health offers a variety of options for travellers throughout the world.

Argentina is an alluring destination brimming with a rich, diverse culture. From tropical, sunny northern cities to snow and skiing in the south, Argentina offers a variety of options for any traveller’s desires.

Buenos Aires, the nation’s capital, is a lively, invigourating city that immerses travellers in the culture and history of Argentina. At the heart of the capital is the Plaza de Mayo, filled with preserved Spanish and European style buildings from the 19th century.

The Iguazú Falls line the border of Argentina and Brazil, and are amongst some of the largest waterfall systems in the world. The Iguazú National Park in Argentina is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

If you’re looking to feel a chill, then you can still find what you seek in one of Argentina’s many ski resorts. Tourists can also head to snowy Ushuaia, which is considered the most southern city in the world.

Do I Need Vaccines for Argentina?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Argentina. The National Travel Health Network and Centre and WHO recommend the following vaccinations for Argentina: hepatitis A , hepatitis B , typhoid , yellow fever , rabies and tetanus .

See the bullets below to learn more about some of these key immunisations:

  • Hepatitis A – Food & Water – Recommended for most travellers to the region, especially if unvaccinated.
  • Hepatitis B – Blood & Body Fluids – Recommended for travellers to most regions.
  • Tetanus – Wounds or Breaks in Skin – Recommended for travellers to most regions, especially if not previously vaccinated.
  • Typhoid – Food & Water – Recommended for travellers to most regions.
  • Yellow Fever – Mosquito – Recommended for travel to Corrientes and Misiones provinces. May be recommended for Formosa, Chaco, Jujuy and Salta.
  • Rabies – Saliva of Infected Animals – High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-stay travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.

See the tables below for more information:

Yellow fever vaccination is recommended for some travellers to Argentina, based on their itinerary. Consult with a travel health specialist to learn if you’ll need one for your trip.

There is a risk of contracting the Zika virus in Argentina. Zika cases are present in the provinces of Chaco, Formosa, Salta, and Tucuman. All travellers are at risk, especially women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. Taking steps to prevent insect bites, such as using DEET-based repellants can lower your risk.

For more information on any of the vaccines above, visit Passport Health’s detailed speciality vaccination pages or make an appointment with your local Travel Medicine Specialist . To make your appointment, ring or booking online now .

Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Argentina?

The majority of travellers can stay in Argentina up to 90 days without a visa. Travellers on Emergency Travel Documents may be denied entry. Passports must be valid for the duration of your stay. Proof of onward or return travel may be required.

Sources: Embassy of Argentina and GOV.UK

What is The Climate Like In Argentina?

The climate in Argentina is diverse, ranging from tropical to polar. Precipitation is generally light to moderate throughout most of Argentina. Here is what to expect in a few diverse tourist destinations:

  • Buenos Aires – The capital city has a moderate temperature, similar to cities in the southeastern United States. Winters are mild, whilst the summers get quite humid and hot. Buenos Aires rarely sees snow.
  • Ushuaia – The capital of Tierra del Fuego is one of the colder regions in Argentina. This area experiences a mild tundra climate. It is also very humid and experiences frequent rain, sleet and snow in the winter months.
  • Iguazú Falls – The climate along the Iguazú River and the Misiones Province is humid subtropical. The temperatures stay high all year. The chance of precipitation near the Iguazú Falls is high. The rainy season is from January to March.

How Safe Is Argentina?

There is criminal activity in Argentina, particularly in bigger cities.

The UK government reports frequent scams involving black and yellow taxis at airports in Buenos Aires. Some of these scams include pretending to help tourists with their money whilst secretly exchanging their bills for forgeries. When flying into Argentina, pre-arrange your ride from the airport using flat-rate “remise” services. When in town, always arrange for your taxi from secure locations such as hotels.

There is also a concern about “express kidnappings”. Victims are kidnapped and forced to withdraw as much money as they can from ATMs. Family, friends or coworkers are contacted and demanded to bring a ransom or as much money as possible. The victim is usually released once the ransom is paid. Some of these victims have included foreigners.

Street crime is a general problem. Common criminals include muggers, scam artists, pickpockets and purse-snatches. It is important to keep your guard up when in hotel lobbies, restaurants, at public transportation locations and on the street.

The UK Embassy reports many cases of stolen passports. Keep your passport and any valuables in a hotel safe and keep a photocopy of your passport on your person.

Extreme Sporting In Argentina

With abundant nature and sprawling, snowy mountains, Argentina is the perfect destination to try out extreme sports. Tourists can enjoy skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, diving, rafting, mountaineering and more.

But, whilst Argentina is the perfect paradise for these peculiar sports, it is still important to exercise caution before speeding down mountains or jumping into unknown waters.

Research all excursions to ensure that you know exactly what you are getting yourself into or if you are even capable of participating. This will prevent unwanted injury whilst you are abroad. Going with a reputable vendor or guide is extremely important as well.

What Should I Take To Argentina?

In addition to all travel documents and medications recommended by a Passport Health Travel Medicine Specialist, here are some items to consider packing:

  • Insect Repellant – Many viruses and potential illnesses in Argentina, including Zika, come from mosquitos or other insects. Packing a repellent with at least 20%-30% DEET will help keep those infecting pests away. Also consider packing neutral-colored and loose-fitting clothing that covers your arms and legs.
  • Motion Sickness Medicine – If you are planning to travel, you may have to take buses over bumpy roads or even boats over choppy waters. Having medication on-hand will help you avoid any discomfort, headaches or nausea.
  • Insect Repellent – Mosquitoes feast at night. Apply repellent whether you’re planning to go out on the town, or stay close to your lodging especially during wet seasons.
  • Sun Cream – The best way to protect your skin’s health and prevent sunburn is to apply sun cream. While it may not seem necessary in certain regions or if it is raining, skin damage can still occur.
  • Varied Clothing – You will need a variety of clothing to deal with the wide range of the temperatures you will face. While wearing shorts and a t-shirt may be comfortable in Buenos Aires, you may need a jacket if you go to areas such as Patagonia or Ushuaia. Bring an umbrella, as rain is common in some parts of the country.
  • Feminine Products – If you are a female traveller, ensure you pack enough sanitary napkins and tampons. Many bloggers and travellers have reported difficulty finding and buying feminine care products throughout parts of South America, particularly in Argentina.

Embassy of the United Kingdom in Argentina

If you are in Argentina and have an emergency (for example, been attacked, arrested or someone has died) contact the nearest consular services. Contact the embassy before arrival if you have additional questions on entry requirements, safety concerns or are in need of assistance.

British Embassy Buenos Aires Dr Luis Agote 2412 (1425) Buenos Aires, Argentina Telephone: +54 11 4808-2200 Emergency Phone: (011) 4808 2200 Fax: +54 11 4808-2235 Email: [email protected]

If you have any questions or concerns about travelling to Argentina or are wondering which jabs you may need for your trip, schedule an appointment with your local Passport Health travel medicine clinic or ring us up at or booking online today.

On This Page: Do I Need Vaccines for Argentina? Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Argentina? What is the Climate Like in Argentina? How Safe is Argentina? Extreme Sporting In Argentina What Should I Take To Argentina? Embassy of the United Kingdom in Argentina

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Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the Northern Mariana Islands.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Norway.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Oman.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Pakistan.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Palau.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Panama.

Papua New Guinea

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Papua New Guinea.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Paraguay.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Peru.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the Philippines.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Poland.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Portugal.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Puerto Rico.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Qatar.

Republic of the Congo

Fully vaccinated visitors from the United States can enter Republic of the Congo without restrictions.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Réunion.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Romania.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Rwanda.

Saint Barthélemy

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saint Barthélemy.

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saint Kitts and Nevis.

Saint Lucia

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saint Lucia.

Saint Martin

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saint Martin.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Samoa.

São Tomé and Príncipe

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter São Tomé and Príncipe.

Saudi Arabia

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Saudi Arabia.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Senegal.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Serbia.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Seychelles.

Sierra Leone

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Sierra Leone.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Singapore.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Slovakia.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Slovenia.

Solomon Islands

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the Solomon Islands.

South Africa

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter South Africa.

South Korea

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter South Korea.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Spain.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Sri Lanka.

St. Maarten

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter St. Maarten.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Sudan.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Suriname.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Sweden.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Switzerland.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Taiwan.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Tajikistan.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Tanzania.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Thailand.

The Bahamas

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter The Bahamas.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Togo.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Tonga.

Trinidad and Tobago

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Trinidad and Tobago.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Tunisia.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Türkiye.

Turkmenistan

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, will not be allowed to enter Turkmenistan.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Tuvalu.

U.S. Virgin Islands

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Uganda.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the United Arab Emirates.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter the United Kingdom.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Uruguay.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Uzbekistan.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Vanuatu.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Vietnam.

Wallis and Futuna

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Wallis and Futuna.

Western Sahara

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, will not be allowed to enter Western Sahara.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Zambia.

Most visitors from the United States, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Zimbabwe.

argentina travel vaccine requirements

Get trip-ready with at-home COVID-19 tests

How often is the data on this page updated.

We check for travel restriction information from government authorities daily, and update the page any time we get new information. The following information regarding travel restrictions for each country is correct to the best of our knowledge at the time of publication.

How many countries are closed to visitors?

As of Sep 11, 2 countries have completely restricted entry to non-citizens and 5 are open but require quarantine and/or a negative COVID test.

Where can I travel without COVID restrictions?

Currently you can travel from the United States to 197 countries without restrictions. Please check our map to learn more.

Are there any other types of travel restrictions besides COVID-19 tests and quarantines?

These are the two main types of restrictions or requirements needed to travel into another country. However, the COVID-19 testing options are continually widening as new methods are developed. Different countries may accept results from different or multiple test types, so be sure to check the individual country's specific requirements.

What should I do if I get COVID-19 while in another country?

If you get COVID-19 while in another country, follow the local authority's recommendations. These may include hospitalization, self-isolating and testing in that country. Be sure to contact your travel insurance company and travel provider as well and inform them of your situation.

What should I do if the borders of the country I am visiting close?

Depending on your home country, you may need to change your departure date and return home as soon as possible. If that's the case, contact your travel provider to find the earliest departure.

Additional resources

  • What you need to know
  • Airline policies
  • Hotel policies
  • Car policies
  • Tips for flying
  • Tips for hotel
  • Tips for vacation rental

If you're looking for personalized travel advice for your own travel plans like whether or not a restriction applies to your trip, we won't be able to answer any questions or offer advice. Please consult your local government's resources.

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argentina travel vaccine requirements

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad
  • Foreign travel advice

Before you travel check that:

  • your destination can provide the healthcare you may need
  • you have appropriate travel insurance for local treatment or unexpected medical evacuation

This is particularly important if you have a health condition or are pregnant.

Emergency medical number

Dial 107 or 911 and ask for an ambulance.

Contact your insurance or medical assistance company promptly if you’re referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Vaccinations

At least 8 weeks before your trip check:

  • the latest information on health risks and what vaccinations you need in TravelHealthPro’s Argentina guide
  • where to get vaccines and whether you have to pay on the NHS travel vaccinations page

Health risks

Health risks in Argentina include:

  • yellow fever

See the ‘Other risks’ section of the TravelHealthPro Argentina guide for more details.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or bought in the UK can be different in other countries.

TravelHealthPro explains best practice when travelling with medicines .

The NHS has information on whether you can take your medicine abroad .

Healthcare facilities

Medical facilities are good but can be expensive. Public hospitals tend to be crowded.

You can view a list of English-speaking doctors in in Argentina .

Travel and mental health

Read FCDO guidance on travel and mental health . There is also guidance on travelling with mental health conditions on TravelHealthPro .

Related content

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Travel vaccinations

When travelling outside Canada, you may be at risk for a number of vaccine preventable illnesses.

You should consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel. This is an opportunity to:

  • review your immunization history
  • make sure your provincial/territorial vaccination schedule is up-to-date
  • discuss any trip-related health concerns you may have
  • assess your needs based on where you plan to travel and what you plan to do

You may need additional vaccinations depending on your age, planned travel activities and local conditions. Preventing disease through vaccination is a lifelong process.

Use the reference below to determine which vaccinations may be recommended or required for your destination.

Vaccination recommendations by destination

Yellow fever vaccination.

Some countries require proof that you have received a yellow fever vaccination before allowing you to enter the country. Consult an embassy or consulate of your destination country in Canada for up-to-date information on its entry and exit requirements before you travel abroad.

Other countries may require you to have been vaccinated for yellow fever if you have passed through an area where yellow fever may occur .

Proof of vaccination must be documented on an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis . You must carry the original certificate with you.

In Canada, the vaccination is only given at designated yellow fever vaccination centres .

Immunization records

  • Download the free CANImmunize app from the iOS App Store or Google Play, and manage your family’s vaccination records on the go.
  • Carry copies of your family’s immunization records while you travel and leave the originals at home.
  • Sickness or injury
  • Travel Advice and Advisories
  • If you get sick after travelling
  • Receiving medical care in other countries
  • Travel health kit
  • Travel insurance
  • Well on Your Way - A Canadian’s Guide to Healthy Travel Abroad
  • Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada , Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • Recommended Immunization Schedules , PHAC

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Chile Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

  • Packing List

After Your Trip

Map - Chile

There are no notices currently in effect for Chile.

⇧ Top

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Chile.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Chile. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Chile.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Chile is free of dog rabies. However, rabies may still be present in wildlife species, particularly bats. CDC recommends rabies vaccination before travel only for people working directly with wildlife. These people may include veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers working with specimens from mammalian species.

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites, chagas disease (american trypanosomiasis).

  • Accidentally rub feces (poop) of the triatomine bug into the bug bite, other breaks in the skin, your eyes, or mouth
  • From pregnant woman to her baby, contaminated blood products (transfusions), or contaminated food or drink.
  • Avoid Bug Bites

Chagas disease

Airborne & droplet

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Chile, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the  Department of State Country Information Pages  for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Chile. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Chile include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Chile’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Chile may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Chile, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Chile for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

Map Disclaimer - The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on maps do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement are generally marked.

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IMAGES

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  2. Vaccinations for Traveling Abroad

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  3. Argentina plans to vaccinate 10 million against Covid-19 by Feb

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COMMENTS

  1. Argentina

    Dosing info - Hep B. Measles. Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series. Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book. Rabies. Argentina is free of dog rabies.

  2. Requirements on Entry to The Argentine Republic

    New rules for the current COVID-19 entry requirements. Since August 24th 2022, it is not required to present anymore neither the affidavit "Declaración Jurada", a COVID-19 test, nor a COVID-19 health insurance to enter Argentina for Argentine Citizens, Foreign Residents and Non-Resident Foreigners. It is also not required to do the quarantine.

  3. Vaccines

    Update on Change to U.S. Travel Policy Requiring COVID-19 Vaccination for nonimmigrant travel. The Administration will end the COVID-19 vaccine requirements for international air travelers at the end of the day on May 11, the same day that the COVID-19 public health emergency ends. ... Outside of Argentina: + ...

  4. Argentina International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  5. Argentina Vaccination Requirement: Do I need a vaccine to travel to

    If you plan on visiting a foreign country and think, 'Do I need a vaccine to travel to Argentina'. The answer is, yes, you do. The explanation being, you can be the transporter of infections from your local nation, and you can take up illnesses from the nation you are visiting. This will bring about spreading a pestilence between the two countries.

  6. Travel Vaccines and Advice for Argentina

    Yellow Fever. Mosquito. Recommended for travel to Corrientes and Misiones provinces. May be recommended for Formosa, Chaco, Jujuy and Salta. Rabies. Saliva of Infected Animals. High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-term travelers and those who may come in contact with animals. Routine Vaccinations for Argentina.

  7. Can I travel to Argentina? Travel Restrictions & Entry Requirements for

    Find continuously updated travel restrictions for Argentina such as border, vaccination, COVID-19 testing, and quarantine requirements.

  8. Travel advice and advisories for Argentina

    SUBE card - Government of Argentina (in Spanish) Air travel. We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards. ... Before travelling, verify your destination's COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional ...

  9. Travelers' Health

    CDC Travelers' Health Branch provides updated travel information, notices, and vaccine requirements to inform international travelers and provide guidance to the clinicians who serve them. ... If sick, do not travel and get tested. See more information about vaccination. Routine Vaccines.

  10. Entry requirements

    Vaccination requirements (other than COVID-19) At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the vaccinations and vaccination certificates you may need on TravelHealthPro's Argentina guide. Customs rules

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  12. Argentina Travel Advice & Safety

    Travelling to Chile from Argentina. Please see our Travel Advice for Chile. Australians need a visa to enter Chile. To learn about Chile's visa requirements please visit the Chilean Government's website. Yellow fever vaccination. You may need a valid yellow fever vaccination certificate to enter Argentina.

  13. Argentina travel advice

    FCDO travel advice for Argentina. Includes safety and security, insurance, entry requirements and legal differences.

  14. Vaccination Requirements Argentina

    You should obtain specific travel health advice in relation to your individual needs and your intended travel, including advice on vaccinations, anti-malarial and other medications based on your past vaccination history, your present medical condition and your intended itinerary. Our staff at travelvax.com.au are trained in the medical travel ...

  15. Travel Vaccines and Advice for Argentina

    Yellow Fever. Mosquito. Recommended for travel to Corrientes and Misiones provinces. May be recommended for Formosa, Chaco, Jujuy and Salta. Rabies. Saliva of Infected Animals. High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-stay travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.

  16. Where can I travel to? Travel Restrictions by Country

    Many countries are reopening their borders for international travel. Find out which countries are open to vaccinated travelers. Just enter your departure country above - the map will update to reflect countries' opening status and any entry requirements for air travelers. Before you book, be sure to double check your country's official ...

  17. NaTHNaC

    Vaccine Recommendations. Details of vaccination recommendations and requirements are provided below. All travellers. Travellers should be up to date with routine vaccination courses and boosters as recommended in the UK.These vaccinations include for example measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine.. Country-specific diphtheria recommendations are not provided here.

  18. Health

    Health risks. Health risks in Argentina include: yellow fever. Zika virus. dengue. See the 'Other risks' section of the TravelHealthPro Argentina guide for more details.

  19. PDF Argentina

    Argentina - Requirements for Entering the Country Updated With Administrative Decision N° 63/2022 (1), the Argentinean government on 26 January 2022 announced that as of 29 January 2022, Argentineans and foreign residents who re-enter the country with a complete vaccination schedule

  20. PDF 18 NOVEMBER 2022 (REVISED ON 3 JANUARY 2023)

    2 Annex 1 of the ITH provides a summary list of countries that WHO has determined with risk of yellow fever transmission - either across their entire territory or part(s) of it -, as well as of country requirements for proof of vaccination against yellow fever as a condition for entry.11 The rationale for vaccination against yellow fever vaccination in international travellers is two-folds:

  21. Travel vaccinations

    Travel vaccinations. When travelling outside Canada, you may be at risk for a number of vaccine preventable illnesses. You should consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel. This is an opportunity to: review your immunization history. make sure your provincial/territorial vaccination ...

  22. Chile

    Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Chile. Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series. Chile is free of dog rabies.