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Dartmouth Engineering Community

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About Dartmouth Engineering

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The best way to experience Dartmouth Engineering is to see it for yourself. Come explore our dynamic community and how we invest in human-centered engineering to make the world a better place.

On This Page

Undergraduate visits, graduate events & visits, the west end district, building maps & self-guided tour.

If you're interested in engineering and planning an in-person visit, but sure to register for a 30-minute info session with a professor or senior staff member, followed by a 30-minute tour/chat with a current student. These info sessions and tours are specific to Dartmouth Engineering. For a general campus tour, contact Dartmouth Undergraduate Admissions .

Engineering Info Sessions & Tours

Summer info sessions and tours are held on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 1:00pm ET . Check in with the Thayer Receptionist in the MacLean Engineering Sciences Center for session location. Dartmouth Engineering student-guided tours are not guaranteed. A self-guided tour will be available when classes are not in session.

Register for an Info Session

Dartmouth Engineering Undergraduate Admissions

dartmouth university campus tour

Engineering Open House

Thayer's Open House is a unique opportunity to learn more about engineering at Dartmouth, including academics, research projects, career services, and entrepreneurship. Free and open to all!

2025 date TBA

We offer both virtual and in-person events about our MEng, MEM, MS, and PhD programs to help you connect with faculty, staff, and students, and navigate the application process.

Event Schedule

Graduate Applicant Visit/Interview

Interviews and visits are set up for applicants at the recommendation of faculty members. Applicants are encouraged to reach out to faculty members they are interested in working with to discuss their research opportunities. If you have questions, please contact us at [email protected]

Hanover, Dartmouth's home, was ranked one of the " 10 best small college towns in the US " by readers of USA Today.

Dartmouth Campus

Thayer School of Engineering (Dartmouth Engineering) is located on Dartmouth's 269-acre main campus surrounded by pristine natural beauty. Dartmouth serves as an intellectual and cultural center for the town and surrounding communities, collectively called "The Upper Valley."

View on Google Maps 15 Thayer Drive, Hanover, NH 03755

The Class of 1982 Engineering and Computer Science Center (ECSC) is a significant expansion of Dartmouth's West End with research and teaching facilities including enhanced new homes for the Department of Computer Science and Magnuson Center for Entrepreneurship. The West End brings together key drivers of human-centered impact—research, experiential learning, and tech-transfer support—and features flexible spaces for hands-on design, fabrication, and problem-solving, giving students from across Dartmouth an unsurpassed environment for learning by doing.

Class of 1982 Engineering and Computer Science Center

West end building fly-overs, students react to dartmouth's west end buildings.

Custom Driving Directions – Google Maps

From Boston area (2.5 hours), or Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (1.5 hours)

  • Follow I-93 north to I-89 north
  • Take Exit 18 (Route 120, Lebanon-Hanover)
  • Turn right off the exit ramp
  • Follow Route 120 north, straight into town (about 4 miles)
  • Bear right onto Park St. at the light in Hanover next to the COOP food store and service station
  • At the third light (at the Berry Sports Center) turn left onto E. Wheelock Street
  • Drive past the Dartmouth Green, and at the second light turn right onto Thayer Drive.
  • The School is straight ahead and to the right.

You may ask the Thayer receptionist, located inside the entrance of the MacLean Engineering Sciences Center, about tours and parking information.

  • Located in Lebanon, NH about 5 miles, or 15-minute driving time, from campus.
  • For reservations, call (800) 227-3247 or visit CapeAir .
  • Located in Manchester, NH about 75 miles, or 1.5 hours driving time, from campus, is served by several major airlines.
  • Located in Boston, MA about 120 miles from Hanover, or 2.5 hours driving time, from campus, is served by many major national and international airlines.
  • Direct bus transportation is available via Dartmouth Coach , which runs daily bus service to and from the Dartmouth campus to Boston and Logan Airport.
  • Located in Hartford, CT about 150 miles, or 2.5 hours driving time, from campus, is served by several major airlines.

Bus & Train

  • Offers daily service between the Dartmouth campus and Boston's South Station and Logan Airport as well as the Yale Club in New York, adjacent to Grand Central Station.
  • Provides frequent service from Boston, New York, Montreal, and other points to White River Junction, Vermont—about a 15-minute drive to Hanover.
  • For information and reservations, call (800) 231-2222.
  • Serves the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire and Vermont, from Monday to Fridays. Rides are free on all Advance Transit bus routes.
  • "Vermonter" service, connects northern Vermont with New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC and arrives daily in White River Junction, Vermont—about 5 miles and 15-minute drive from Hanover.
  • For information and reservations, call (800) 872-7245.

dartmouth university campus tour

Visitor Parking Options

Paid visitor parking is available in the Emily and Errik Anderson Parking Garage under the Class of 1982 Engineering and Computer Science Center. Limited parking spaces are also available near the traffic circles on Thayer Drive and Tuck Mall. Additional visitor parking is located in G Parking Lot, which is about a 20-minute walk to Dartmouth Engineering. Free shuttle service is available from G-Lot to various areas of campus.

More information about public parking and rates are available on Dartmouth's Transportation page .

Visitor Parking Information & Map

dartmouth university campus tour

Dartmouth Engineering's classrooms, labs, and offices are primarily housed in three main facilities in the West End District: the Class of 1982 Engineering and Computer Science Center, MacLean Engineering Sciences Center, and Cummings Hall.

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Can't be here in person? Take a video tour.

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Search this Site

Below, please find information and links to help you plan your visit to campus! We have included a selection of travel, lodging and area attractions for your convenience– please note that we do not recommend or endorse any particular options.

  • Directions to Dartmouth
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  • Visiting Dartmouth
  • Explore the Green
  • Undergraduate Deans Office
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  • Hopkins Center for the Arts
  • Hood Museum
  • Ledyard Canoe Club

Last Updated: 4/25/22

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Upper Valley Field Trips

A collaborative effort of geog 7: landscapes of new england.

Upper Valley Field Trips

Dartmouth College Campus Tour

fieldtrip-zoomed

Hanover Inn

The first stop of the field trip is at the iconic Hanover Inn , located on the corner of Main and E Wheelock St, which overlooks the college Green. The Inn, originally called the Dartmouth Hotel, was founded in 1780 by General Ebenezer Brewster. The Inn grew over time as more people began living in and visiting Hanover and Dartmouth. The Inn suffered one fire and underwent several renovations during its transition from a house to its current state today. It now holds the record for the oldest continuous business in the entire state. The patrons of the Inn range from parents of students to alumni to visiting professors, and the Inn is vital in accommodating the large number of visitors that come to Dartmouth.

Hanover Inn, 1888.

Hanover Inn, 1888.

The Hop and the Hood

Optimized-Hop and Hood

The Hopkins Center for the Arts

If you turn to the left of the Hanover Inn you will see the Hopkins Center for the Arts and the Hood Museum of Art , where students, residents, and visitors alike can see live performances and art from around the world. The Hop, as it is commonly called, opened in 1962 and resembles the famed Lincoln Center in New York City; the Hop’s opening, however, actually preceded the Lincoln Center. The Hood building was completed in 1985, but the college collections have been built up since 1772 and now total about 65,000 pieces. The Inn, the Hop, and the Hood mark a meeting point between the town and campus. While the Hop and Hood buildings serve both Dartmouth and the town, as you cross the street you will notice that most buildings are college-owned buildings used primarily by Dartmouth students.

TheGreen

The Green viewed from Baker Tower

Cross the street from the Hop and you will find yourself on the college Green, the central hub of the campus from which everything else expands. The quadrangle design originally comes from Oxford and Cambridge, and is now found throughout most college campuses in the U.S. When Dartmouth and Hanover were still young, the Green, known as the Common, was utilized to hold town meetings and to graze cattle. Then, in the late 19 th century it was fenced in by the college to discourage public use. Today, the Green is open to the public, but still remains an area dominated by Dartmouth students during the school year.

Optimized-DHall

Dartmouth Hall in 2015

Dartmouth Hall

Dartmouth Hall in 1807

As you continue to walk away from the Hop and the Hood and stop in the middle of the Green you will see Dartmouth Hall to the right, one of the first buildings at the college. The original was built in 1784, but suffered several fires and was rebuilt using the original plans. It, along with the surrounding buildings that can be recognized by their similar design, served as both the academic and housing buildings for the college in its early years. Despite the fires, Dartmouth Hall remains very similar in appearance from when it was originally built. Very little material remains from the original hall, except for the beautiful granite steps.

Collis and others

Optimized-collis

Collis and Robinson Hall

If you look to the southwest corner of the the Green, you will see a row of brick buildings with stone highlights, which are some of the few examples of Romanesque architecture on campus. These buildings were all built at approximately the same time, around the year 1910. Most of these buildings are now used for administrative purposes, except for Collis, the southernmost one with large stone pillars. Collis was originally an academic building, but a donation was given in the 1970’s to turn it into a student center. Today, it houses a café and several social and study spaces.

Baker Library

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If you continue across the Green to the north you will come upon Baker Library. While the Green is the physical center of the campus, Baker is the academic center on campus. Constructed in 1928, the library was modeled after Independence Hall. It was named after Fisher Ames Baker, the uncle of George Fisher Baker, who donated the money to construct the building.

Baker Library; main corridor, undated

Baker Lobby, 1940s-1950s

For many years the lobby of Baker Library held card catalogs, but today is home to couches, chairs, and tables for collaborative work, along with various artifacts of Dartmouth history. In the basement, you can find the Orozco mural room ; upstairs, there are several conference rooms and the Tower Room. Furthermore, if you are looking for food, Baker Library recently added a small, outsourced café known as King Arthur Flour.

After walking through Baker Library, you will pass the “stacks,” which contains over six floors of hundreds of thousands of volumes, along with individual workspaces. It will become apparent as you walk past the stacks that you are entering the newer addition to the library.

Berry Library

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Walkway in Berry Library

From 1928 until 2000, Baker underwent several additions and renovations until the Berry section of the library was officially added. The Berry section of the library brought with it several new study spaces, additional computer areas, classrooms, a café, and most importantly, increased book capacity. The second floor of Berry is home to the Jones Media Center and Evans Map Room, while the third and fourth floors have many spaces to work quietly.

If you take the stairs down in Berry you will see Novack Café, owned and operated by Dartmouth. This is the most social space in the library and contains several meeting rooms too.

Webster Avenue

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Webster Avenue in 1947

As you exit the library and turn to the left you will come to Webster Avenue. Webster Avenue is home to the social center of campus.

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Greek Houses on Webster Avenue

This street is home to many of Dartmouth’s fraternities and sororities. In the 1920s, with the expansion of the Greek system at Dartmouth, and across the country, Webster Avenue, became home to several fraternities and sororities. Each house is built in its own unique style. At the end of the street, farthest from the library, is the president’s house.

Cutter-Shabazz “Quad”

If you walk past Webster Avenue towards the northern end of campus, there is smaller quadrangle with several buildings on its surroundings to your left. This area contains the Cutter-Shabazz building (which is modeled after the Baker Library), surrounded by the Sustainable Living Community, Webster Cottage and Choate House. The area resembles the Green, with Cutter Shabazz in place of Baker Library and the surrounding buildings taking the place of the building around the Green.

Webster Cottage is actually the oldest standing building at Dartmouth today. The cottage was built in 1780 and was the home of many inhabitants, including Daniel Webster. Today, it is currently home to the Hanover Historical Society . If you would like to visit, it is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2:30 to 4:30.

Cutter Shabazz during Vice President Joe Biden's visit

Cutter Shabazz during Vice President Joe Biden’s visit

Choate House, built in 1786, was originally where Webster Hall stands today. The building was moved several times and at one point housed the math department. Originally, Cutter-Shabbaz was built for the Clark Preparatory School in 1953 but was bought by Dartmouth several years later. Today it is home to the African-American Society; the Society hosts various events throughout the year, such as cookouts, dances, and speakers.

The Sustainable Living Community is an LLC, a Living Learning Community. These communities focus on placing Dartmouth students with others who share similar interests and wish to combine their academic experience with their social and living environment at Dartmouth. These communities’ focuses range widely, from language and culture to strictly academic interests such as Math or Computer Science.

Geisel School of Medicine

Lastly, if you continue down North Main Street St. you will eventually run into the intersection with Maynard St. You may end your tour here, or you can finish by visiting the Medical School.

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The Geisel School of Medicine is the fourth oldest medical school in the country, founded in 1797. Its location is of particular interest. While still on the campus, the school is on the very outskirts. This is consistent with the other graduate schools on Dartmouth’s campus, Tuck and Thayer. Additionally, as codes and safety regulations are constantly being updated, science/medical buildings must undergo renovations. As a result, most science and engineering buildings at colleges around the country are found in newer buildings on the outskirts of the camps. At Dartmouth, the Geisel School of Medicine fits this trend, as it is the most northern building on campus.

I hope you enjoyed the tour and please return sometime soon!

Explore Dartmouth's Changing Campus Through a Virtual Tour

From the West End to the Arts District and all corners of campus, support for The Call to Lead is enhancing the Dartmouth experience for everyone.

Let us do the walking while you explore the new developments on campus transforming Dartmouth’s future.

The West End

Begin your interactive virtual tour at the West End of campus, exploring the largest construction project in Dartmouth’s history, the $200 million Engineering and Computer Science Center.

The Center is the second largest building on campus and only steps away from the 55,000-square-foot Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy and Society, which serves as a crossroads for students and faculty who are embracing the topic of energy and society and the study of our energy future.

The Heart of Campus

Next, head to the heart of campus to explore the future of Dartmouth Hall, a building that has endured for more than two centuries as a touchstone for every student who passes through its doors. The newly renovated and enhanced building will be accessible for all, and will open its doors in fall 2022.

Just across The Green, check out the renovated and expanded Hood Museum of Art, designed by acclaimed architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. Then, stop into the Hop to hear stories of creation ahead of a re-imagined Hopkins Center for the Arts, coming this fall.

Be sure to head over to the newly opened Graham Indoor Practice Facility, next to Thompson Arena, for an exclusive look at the Ivy League’s largest facility of its kind. The 70,000-square-foot-space features a 280-by-200-foot practice space as well as dedicated batting tunnels that will allow Dartmouth’s eight varsity field sports teams to practice in any weather.

The North End

Close out your virtual tour on the North End of Campus, exploring the gracefully renovated Anonymous Hall. Named in honor of the countless alumni who have supported Dartmouth through deeds large and small, known and unknown, the building is home to the Frank J. Guarini School of Graduate and Advanced Studies and the Department of Linguistics.

Take a stroll around Occom Pond and stop by the Dartmouth Outing Club House, located on the North Shore. Since its construction in 1929 as a gift from the Class of 1900, the Dartmouth Outing Club House on Occom Pond has served as a social gathering place for outdoorsy students, alumni, faculty, and local residents.

After years of capable service, the recently renovated DOC House is ready to welcome new generations of the Dartmouth community, with new facilities inside and an upgraded entry porch and terraces outside. The renovation was funded entirely by the Class of 1969 as their 50th Reunion gift to the College.

The Boathouse and Moosilauke Lodge

The Friends of Dartmouth Rowing boathouse, on the banks of the Connecticut River, got a new lease on life with a 2019 renovation, adding two indoor moving water tanks to allow teams to train on schedule, regardless of rugged weather. Today’s reimagined boathouse  is ready to serve our crews for years to come.

Moosilauke Ravine Lodge has welcomed Dartmouth’s outdoor-loving community since 1939. The new lodge , dedicated in 2017, continues the tradition of hearty community meals, a rustic atmosphere, and warming fieldstone fireplaces. Six bunkhouses, each a gift from a Dartmouth class, add to the comfort of overnight guests (the lodge hosts an average of 4,000 each year).

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See Our Campus

Experience a rich quality of life, community, and culture..

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  360° Virtual Tour

Walk the Tuck grounds from anywhere, anytime. Our 360° campus tour lets you explore points of interest on your desktop or mobile device. Start your virtual tour today. 

Take a TOUR

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  Interactive Campus Map

Explore the Tuck campus and quickly locate buildings, administrative offices, parking, housing, and other points of interest. Experience the beautiful Tuck Campus now!

VIEW THE MAP

WATCH: Discover Our Campus

WATCH: The Tuck MBA: Be Here.

Interactive campus map, building map (pdf).

100 Tuck Hall Hanover, NH 03755 USA

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Dartmouth Tour Tuesdays

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Join us for the inaugural season of Tour Tuesdays!

Every Tuesday in July and August, we invite you to attend interactive tours, lab visits and other activities that showcase Dartmouth's incredible research, history and unique features. Free and open to all - staff, students, community members and visitors (minors must be accommpanied by an adult). 

RSVP to any of the following events here . Please  indicate which tours you would like to attend, and we will confirm with location and other details. Tours may fill quickly, and we will maintain wait lists.

  • 11:30-12:30  53 Commons tour and lunch
  • 1:00-2:30pm Paleoanthropology (fossil human) lab
  • 11:30-12:30 53 Commons tour and lunch
  • 2:30pm-2:50pm Webster Cottage
  • 3:00pm-3:20pm Webster Cottage
  • 4:00pm-4:20pm Webster Cottage
  • 12:15pm-1:45pm Sacred spaces
  • 2:00pm-2:45pm Data Experiences and Visualizations Studio: The DEV Studio
  • 11:15am-12:45pm Genomics
  • 2:30pm-2:50pm  Webster Cottage
  • 3:00pm-3:20pm  Webster Cottage
  • 3:30pm-3:50pm  Webster Cottage
  • 5:00pm-5:45pm Dartmouth Cemetery

August 6 th

  • 2:00pm-3:00pm Heating Plant/Steam Tunnels (No open toe shoes)

August 13 th

August 20 th

  • 12:00pm-1:15pm Rauner Library
  • 1:00-2:30pm Human anatomy lab

August 27 th

Tours in Development

  • Baker Tower
  • Greenhouses
  • College Arborist
  • Dartmouth Organic Farm
  • Athletic Facilities
  • Architectural Tour
  • All Libraries
  • Pine Park (Geology)
  • OSHER at Dartmouth
  • Government Department
  • Hanover Food Tour
  • Greek Life 1
  • Greek Life 2
  • Rassias Experience
  • Sherman art library
  • Jones Media Lab

Contact Information

For more information about Tour Tuesdays please feel free to reach out to us at  [email protected]

Dartmouth-Campus-Map-2023.pdf

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Paul Rudolph's Modernist Campus Tour

A legacy of an architect paul marvin rudolph: a world-class vision for a public university.

Welcome to the Virtual Self-Guided Architectural Tour of Paul Rudolph's Brutalist campus at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  

Tour Summary

Visitors, along the way, will learn about the life and career of renowned international architect Paul Marvin Rudolph. Explore Rudolph’s urbanist campus and become familiar with his aesthetic and design approaches for Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (now UMass Dartmouth). Discover the cultural significance of Rudolph’s Brutalist complex and why many consider this 1960s campus an architectural treasure of the Modernist era. Ultimately, gain an appreciation for this Brutalist icon representing mid-century America, an age of optimism and idealism.

The tour begins in parking "lot 3" outside the LARTS Building.  Follow along the walkways outlined in the virtual map.  Each stop includes a brief video highlighting an aspect of Paul Rudolph's Brutalist campus. The guided tour includes thirteen video stops (3-5 minutes each) and takes approximately forty-five (45) minutes to complete . Mobile Instructions (PDF)

Project Overview 

In April 2023, UMass Dartmouth launched its first virtual walking tour featuring Brutalist architect Paul Rudolph and his monumental, heroic architecture. The goal was to develop a web and mobile-responsive architecture tour to increase campus and public awareness and knowledge of architect Paul Marvin Rudolph and his contribution to modernist architecture and to instill an appreciation for his world-renowned campus, the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. This endeavor was funded by a Creative Economy Initiatives Grant from the UMass President’s Office and supported by UMassBrut .

  • Stop 1: Life & Career of Paul Marvin Rudolph
  • Stop 2: Paul Rudolph & His Masterplan
  • Stop 3: Rudolph’s Brutalist Campus
  • Stop 4: Love at First Sight
  • Stop 5: Is It Sculpture or Is It Architecture?
  • Stop 6: Hardly a Concrete Jungle
  • Stop 7: Raw Concrete: Breaking Boundaries
  • Stop 8: Architecture is Like Music
  • Stop 9: A Spatial Interplay
  • Stop 10: Campanile & The Public Square
  • Stop 11: Everchanging Perspectives
  • Stop 12: University Library: In Need of Care
  • Stop 13: Rudolph's Brutalist Vision Revitalized

Project Staff

  • Producer: Anna Dempsey, Professor of Art History & Allison J. Cywin, Librarian
  • Script: Anna Dempsey, Professor of Art History & Allison J. Cywin, Librarian
  • Director & Project Manager: Allison J. Cywin, Librarian
  • Researcher & Photographic Researcher: Anna D. Dempsey, Professor of Art History & Allison J. Cywin, Librarian
  • Video producer & Narrator : David Sardinha, Pineapple Studios
  • Interactive Map: Allison J. Cywin
  • Archivist: Judy Farrar, Archivist, Claire T. Carney Library Archives and Special Collections at UMass Dartmouth
  • Graphic Logo: Michael Swartz

Special Thanks

Special thanks to UMass President’s Office, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, College of Visual & Performing Arts, Claire T. Carney Library Archives and Special Collections at UMass Dartmouth, UMassBrut , Paul Rudolph Institute for Modern Architecture, Library of Congress (Prints and Drawings Department), Harvard University, and The Charnel House for their support with this project.

Special acknowledgments to those dedicated members of the UMass Dartmouth community, including Judy Farrar, Bruce Barnes, Lasse Antonsen, and Frederick V. Grifun, whose efforts to document, interview, and collect materials related to UMass Dartmouth’s architectural heritage through exhibitions, publications, oral histories, and other academic endeavors made this project possible.

Project Resources

  • Project Summary
  • Reference List (PDF)
  • Paul Rudolph and His Architecture.  Claire T. Carney Archives and Special Collections
  • UMassBrut (Join to support the Preservation of UMass Modernist Architectural Heritage)
  • University of Dartmouth Claire T. Carney Library Archives and Special Collection: Paul Rudolph & His Architecture

Other Resources

  • More Brutalist Architecture
  • Things to Do in the Region

Life on campus

Some of your most important college experiences will happen outside the classroom.

Last modified: Tue, Jun 20, 2023, 01:24 by Melissa Kinney

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Family Weekend 2024

Save the Date ’25 and ’28 parents and families! Mark your calendars for Family Weekend from Friday, September 27 to Sunday, September 29. Events begin around noon Friday and end mid-afternoon Sunday.

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Find Your Reunion Schedule

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Reunions 2024 Take Unity to New Heights

Jun 20, 2024

Celeste Gigliotti

If Reunions 2023 made a splash with its torrential rain, Reunions 2024 was its much-needed sunny successor. Boasting clear skies and more than 4,500 alumni, family, and friends flocking to campus, Reunions offered the wide range of programming and recreational fun it’s known and loved for.

Aerial shot of Reunions 2024 Community Lunch on the Green

Reveling in Camaraderie

Reunions have one primary purpose—to reunite—and Reunions 2024 achieved it with flying colors. Even torrential rain on Sunday morning could not dampen the sprits of the Class of 1974, who capped off their 50th Reunion weekend by leading the Commencement procession and welcoming in the Class of 2024 to the alumni family. The Classes of 1964 and 1969 made their returns to campus mid-week, with class tents available all day every day for socializing at their leisure. The second weekend hosted the largest population of attendees simultaneously, with eight Reunion classes of from the ’80s, ’90s, and ’00s gathering to kindle, and rekindle, the friendships they made at dear old Dartmouth.

Our affinity groups also capitalized on the opportunity to connect. The Black Alumni of Dartmouth Association, Dartmouth Asian Pacific American Alumni Association, Dartmouth Association of Latino Alumni), Dartmouth Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Alumni/ae Association, Native American Alumni Association of Dartmouth, and Women of Dartmouth all gathered for a reception in in the atrium of the Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy and Society. DGALA hosted its own Reunion breakfast the morning of the 15th, with President Sian Leah Beilock making a special appearance.

Three alums having fun at the Community Lunch

Embracing Traditions, New and Old

And while Reunions 2024 remained true to its roots, new traditions were also borne this year—most notably the first ever Community Lunch on the Green on Saturday. For the first time in Reunions history, all classes gathered to enjoy a meal together, enabling reconnection and reunion with fellow alums who never resided in Hanover at the same time. The Alumni Relations team went all out for the inaugural luncheon, with a barbecue spread, inflatables for the Dartmouth kids to enjoy, music, and ice cream and cotton candy galore. 

That opportunity for cross-class convening continued into the evening, where Saturday night’s On the Green festivities were able to return in their full glory. With a live band for the first time in several years and a fireworks display, Reunion-goers got to let loose and have fun. Green glow sticks added to the magic, and maple popcorn and candies were a tasty reminder they’d returned to the Upper Valley. 

And naturally, our Reunion classes made the most of the everything the beloved Upper Valley has to offer. The Class of 1988 broke out their kayaks and cruised down the beautiful Connecticut River. The Class of 1994 carved out time for a peaceful Occom walk as a group. The Classes of 2003, 2004, and 2005 joined together for a strength workout and yoga session at the Bema.

Sharing the Fun on Social

IG story of the Connecticut River from Reunions 2024

Getting Down to Business 

The week’s scheduled programming nourished the need to learn and critically engage. President Beilock joined Chief Health and Wellness Officer Estevan Garcia in a packed room to discuss the attention to mental health on campus and Dartmouth’s progress toward those institutional goals so far.

President Beilock and Estevan Garcia orating in front of a seated crowd

In the spirit of presidential priorities, the itinerary included a Dartmouth Dialogues session with co-directors of the Dialogue Project Dean Elizabeth Smith and Kristi Clemens. They provided an overview of the initiative, delved into the actions taken to date, and how alumni can support the continuation of productive, open discussion on campus. 

And esteemed actress and comedian Rachel Dratch ’88 returned to campus for a very special Back to Class session about the Hopkins Center for the Arts. She reflected on her time at the Hop and discussed the power and influence of its place on campus with Mary Lou Aleskie, the Howard Gilman ’44 Executive Director of the Hopkins Center.

Traditions old or new, skies rainy or clear, it was a triumphant week, and Dartmouth already looks forward to welcoming more alumni back to beloved Hanover. 

For more info about upcoming Reunions dates, visit the Reunions page .

Find yourself in our Reunions photos!

’74 and his family at Reunions 2024

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2024 Commencement Address by Roger Federer

The tennis champion says “effortless” is a myth.

Roger Federer speaking at a podium

Roger Federer Holds Court at Dartmouth Commencement

Hello, Class of 2024!

It’s an incredible feeling to be here with you.

I am so excited to join you today.

Really, you have no idea how excited I am. Keep in mind, this is literally the second time I have ever set foot on a college campus. Second time ever.

But for some reason, you are giving me a doctorate degree.

I just came here to give a speech, but I get to go home as “Dr. Roger.” That’s a pretty nice bonus.

“Dr. Roger.” This has to be my most unexpected victory ever!

President Beilock, the Board of Trustees, faculty members—thank you for this honor.

President Beilock, I’m incredibly grateful. And I’ll try my best not to choke.

I’m a little outside my comfort zone today. This is not my usual scene...

And these are not my usual clothes.

Do you dress like this every day at Dartmouth?

The robe is hard to move in. Keep in mind I’ve worn shorts almost every day for the last 35 years.

I’m not a person who gives a lot of speeches like this. Maybe the worst... but an important speech... was when I started out on the Swiss national team. I was 17 years old, and I was so nervous that I couldn’t even say more than four words: “Happy… to… be… here.”

Well, here we are, 25 years later. I still feel a little nervous, but I’ve got a lot more than four words to say to you. Starting with: I’m happy to be here! Happy to be with you, here on the Green.

As you might have heard... grass is my favorite surface.

“Big Green”... it must be destiny!

There is another reason I’m here, and I can sum it up in two words:

Or pong, as you call it. And I guess you can call it what you like—I’m told Dartmouth invented it!

Now, this sport... Wait. Is pong a sport?

Or is it a way of life?

Either way, Dartmouth is the Wimbledon of pong.

I’m glad I got to work on my shots with some of you. I’m actually thinking about turning pro.

But I know there’s more to Dartmouth than pong. I have spent an amazing couple of days here, and you have made Hanover feel like home. The mountains here are exactly like the Swiss Alps.

Just… shorter.

But I’m loving it here. I got a chance to hit some balls with my kids at the Boss Tennis Center... I did a Woccom… I got to climb the Baker Tower, saw some incredible views and took my kids to see the Dr. Seuss books at the library. Of course I also crushed some chocolate chip cookies from FoCo… and ate an EBA’s chicken sandwich from Lou’s.

But there is another big reason I’m here: Tony G., Class of ’93.

Are we rapping now?

Tony Godsick is my business partner, my longtime agent, one of my closest friends, and most important...

The proud father of Isabella, Class of 2024.

From Tony—and now Bella—I know how special this place truly is. And how loyal you are to each other, and how obsessive you are about this color Green. I was with their family, including Mary Joe and Nico, the day Bella got into Dartmouth. I remember how crazy happy she was. I saw a smile and a level of excitement on her face that I had never seen before...

But then I got here... and actually, everybody is smiling like this.

I can see how proud you are of this place... and this moment.

You have worked so hard to get here. I have huge respect for all you have achieved.

And for the family and friends who have helped you achieve it. Let’s give them a big hand.

I’m even more impressed, because I left school at the age of 16 to play tennis full-time.

So I never went to college... but I did graduate recently.

I graduated tennis.

I know the word is “retire.” “Roger Federer retired from tennis.” Retired... The word is awful.

You wouldn’t say you retired from college, right? Sounds terrible.

Like you, I’ve finished one big thing and I’m moving on to the next.

Like you, I’m figuring out what that is.

Graduates, I feel your pain.

I know what it’s like when people keep asking what your plan is for the rest of your life.

They ask me: “Now that you are not a professional tennis player, what do you do?”

I don’t know… and it’s OK not to know.

So what do I do with my time?

I’m a dad first, so, I guess, I drive my kids to school?

Play chess online against strangers?

Vacuum the house?

No, in truth, I’m loving the life of a tennis graduate. I graduated tennis in 2022, and you are graduating college in 2024. So I have a head start in answering the question of what’s next.

Today, I want to share a few lessons I’ve relied on through this transition.

Let’s call them… tennis lessons.

I hope they will be useful in the world beyond Dartmouth.

Here’s the first:

“Effortless”… is a myth.

I say that as someone who has heard that word a lot. “Effortless.”

People would say my play was effortless. Most of the time, they meant it as a compliment... But it used to frustrate me when they would say, “He barely broke a sweat!”

Or “Is he even trying?”

The truth is, I had to work very hard... to make it look easy.

I spent years whining... swearing… throwing my racket… before I learned to keep my cool.

The wakeup call came early in my career, when an opponent at the Italian Open publicly questioned my mental discipline. He said, “Roger will be the favorite for the first two hours, and then I’ll be the favorite after that.”

I was puzzled at first. But eventually, I realized what he was trying to say. Everybody can play well the first two hours. You’re fit, you’re fast, you’re clear... and after two hours, your legs get wobbly, your mind starts wandering, and your discipline starts to fade.

It made me understand... I have so much work ahead of me, and I’m ready to go on this journey now. I get it.

My parents, my coaches, my fitness coach, everyone had really been calling me out—and now even my rivals were doing it. Players!!! Thank you! I’m eternally grateful for what you did.

So I started training harder. A lot harder.

But then I realized: winning effortlessly is the ultimate achievement.

I got that reputation because my warm-ups at the tournaments were so casual that people didn’t think I had been training hard. But I had been working hard... before the tournament, when nobody was watching.

Maybe you’ve seen a version of this at Dartmouth.

How many times did you feel like your classmates were racking up “A” after “A” without even trying… while you were pulling all-nighters... loading up on caffeine… crying softly in a corner of Sanborn Library?

Hopefully, like me, you learned that “effortless” is a myth.

I didn’t get where I got on pure talent alone. I got there by trying to outwork my opponents.

I believed in myself. But BELIEF in yourself has to be earned.

There was a moment in 2003 when my self-belief really kicked in.

It was at the ATP Finals, where only the best eight players qualify.

I beat some top players I really admired—by aiming right at their strengths. Before, I would run away from their strengths. If a guy had a strong forehand, I would try to hit to his backhand. But now... I would try to go after his forehand. I tried to beat the baseliners from the baseline. I tried to beat the attackers by attacking. I tried to beat the net rushers from the net.

I took a chance by doing that. So why did I do it?

To amplify my game and expand my options. You need a whole arsenal of strengths... so if one of them breaks down, you’ve got something left.

When your game is clicking like that, winning is easy—relatively.

Then there are days when you just feel broken.

Your back hurts… your knee hurts… Maybe you’re a little sick… or scared…

But you still find a way to win.

And those are the victories we can be most proud of.

Because they prove that you can win not just when you are at your best, but especially when you aren’t.

Yes, talent matters. I’m not going to stand here and tell you it doesn’t.

But talent has a broad definition.

Most of the time, it’s not about having a gift. It’s about having grit.

In tennis, a great forehand with sick racquet head speed can be called a talent.

But in tennis... like in life... discipline is also a talent. And so is patience.

Trusting yourself is a talent. Embracing the process, loving the process, is a talent.

Managing your life, managing yourself... these can be talents, too.

Some people are born with them. Everybody has to work at them.

From this day forward, some people are going to assume that because you graduated from Dartmouth, it all comes easy for you.

And you know what? Let them believe that…

As long as you don’t.

OK, second lesson:

It’s only a point.

Let me explain.

You can work harder than you thought possible... and still lose. I have.

Tennis is brutal. There’s no getting around the fact that every tournament ends the same way... one player gets a trophy... Every other player gets back on a plane, stares out of the window, and thinks... “how the hell did I miss that shot?”

Imagine if, today, only one of you got a degree.

Congratulations, this year’s graduate! Let’s give her a hand.

The rest of you... the other one thousand of you... better luck next time!

So, you know, I tried not to lose.

But I did lose... sometimes big. For me, one of the biggest was the finals at Wimbledon in 2008. Me vs. Nadal. Some call it the greatest match of all time. OK, all respect to Rafa, but I think it would have been way way better if I had won...

Losing at Wimbledon was a big deal... because winning Wimbledon is everything.

Obviously, except winning the Dartmouth Masters pong title, sophomore summer.

I mean, I’ve gotten to play in some amazing venues around the world, but when you have the chance to walk onto Centre Court at Wimbledon... the cathedral of tennis... and when you finish as the champion... you feel the magnitude of the moment. There’s nothing like it.

In 2008, I was going for a record sixth consecutive title. I was playing for history.

I’m not going to walk you through the match, point by point. If I did, we would be here for hours.

Almost five hours, to be exact.

There were rain delays, the sun went down... Rafa won two sets, I won the next two sets in tiebreaks, and we found ourselves at seven all in the fifth.

I understand why people focus on the end... the final minutes so dark I could barely see the chalk on the grass. But looking back... I feel like I lost at the very first point of the match.

I looked across the net and I saw a guy who, just a few weeks earlier, crushed me in straight sets at the French Open, and I thought... this guy is maybe hungrier than I am... And he’s finally got my number.

It took me until the third set before I remembered... hey, buddy, you’re the five-time defending champion! And you’re on grass, by the way. You know how to do this... But that came too late, and Rafa won. And it was well-deserved.

Some defeats hurt more than others.

I knew I would never get another shot at six in a row.

I lost Wimbledon. I lost my number-one ranking. And suddenly, people said, “He had a great run. Is this the changing of the guard?”

But I knew what I had to do... keep working. And keep competing.

In tennis, perfection is impossible... In the 1,526 singles matches I played in my career, I won almost 80% of those matches... Now, I have a question for all of you... what percentage of the POINTS do you think I won in those matches?

In other words, even top-ranked tennis players win barely more than half of the points they play.

When you lose every second point, on average, you learn not to dwell on every shot.

You teach yourself to think: OK, I double-faulted. It’s only a point.

OK, I came to the net and I got passed again. It’s only a point.

Even a great shot, an overhead backhand smash that ends up on ESPN’s Top Ten Plays: that, too, is just a point.

Here’s why I am telling you this.

When you’re playing a point, it is the most important thing in the world.

But when it’s behind you, it’s behind you... This mindset is really crucial, because it frees you to fully commit to the next point… and the next one after that… with intensity, clarity and focus.

The truth is, whatever game you play in life... sometimes you’re going to lose. A point, a match, a season, a job... it’s a roller coaster, with many ups and downs.

And it’s natural, when you’re down, to doubt yourself. To feel sorry for yourself.

And by the way, your opponents have self-doubt, too. Don’t ever forget that.

But negative energy is wasted energy.

You want to become a master at overcoming hard moments. That to me is the sign of a champion.

The best in the world are not the best because they win every point... It’s because they know they’ll lose... again and again… and have learned how to deal with it.

You accept it. Cry it out if you need to... then force a smile.

You move on. Be relentless. Adapt and grow.

Work harder. Work smarter. Remember: work smarter.

Lesson three...

Are you guys still with me?

For a guy who left school at 16, this is a lot of lessons!

OK, here is the third one:

Life is bigger than the court.

A tennis court is a small space. 2,106 square feet, to be exact. That’s for singles matches.

Not much bigger than a dorm room.

OK, make that three or four dorm rooms in Mass Row.

I worked a lot, learned a lot, and ran a lot of miles in that small space... But the world is a whole lot bigger than that... Even when I was just starting out, I knew that tennis could show me the world... but tennis could never be the world.

I knew that if I was lucky, maybe I could play competitively until my late 30s. Maybe even… 41!

But even when I was in the top five... it was important to me to have a life... a rewarding life, full of travel, culture, friendships, and especially family... I never abandoned my roots, and I never forgot where I came from... but I also never lost my appetite to see this very big world.

I left home at 14 to go to school in the French part of Switzerland for two years, and I was horribly homesick at first... But I learned to love a life on the move.

Maybe these are the reasons I never burned out.

I was excited to travel the world, but not just as a tourist... I realized pretty early that I wanted to serve other people in other countries. Motivated by my South African mother, I started a foundation to empower children through education.

Early childhood education is something we take for granted in a place like Switzerland. But in sub-Saharan Africa, 75% of children don’t have access to preschool... Think about that: 75%.

Like all children... they need a good start if they are going to fulfill their potential. And so far, we’ve helped nearly 3 million children to get a quality education and helped to train more than 55,000 teachers.

It’s been an honor... and it’s been humbling.

An honor to help tackle this challenge, and humbling to see how complex it is.

Humbling to try to read stories to children in one of the languages of Lesotho.

Humbling also to arrive in rural Zambia and have to explain what tennis actually is... I vividly remember drawing a tennis court on the chalkboard for the kids to see, because I asked them what tennis was, and one kid said, “it’s the one with the table, right? With the paddles?”

Pong again. It’s everywhere.

I have to tell you, it’s a wonderful feeling to visit these incredibly rural places... and find classrooms full of children who are learning, and reading, and playing, like children everywhere should be allowed to do.

It’s also inspiring to see what they grow up to be: Some have become nurses... Teachers... Computer programmers.

It’s been an exciting journey... and I feel like we’re only at the beginning... with so much more to learn. I can’t believe we’ve just celebrated twenty years of this work... Especially because I started the foundation before I thought I was ready.

I was 22 at the time, like many of you are today. I was not ready for anything other than tennis. But sometimes... you’ve got to take a chance and then figure it out.

Philanthropy can mean a lot of things. It can mean starting a nonprofit, or donating money. But it can also mean contributing your ideas... your time... and your energy... to a mission that is larger than yourself. All of you have so much to give, and I hope you will find your own, unique ways to make a difference.

Because life really is much bigger than the court.

As a student at Dartmouth, you picked a major and went deep. But you also went wide. Engineers learned art history, athletes even sang a-cappella , and computer scientists learned to speak German.

Dartmouth’s legendary football coach Buddy Teevens used to recruit players by telling their parents: “Your son will be a great football player when it’s football time, a great student when it’s academic time, and a great person all the time.”

That is what a Dartmouth education is all about.

Tennis has given me so many memories. But my off-court experiences are the ones I carry forward just as much... The places I’ve gotten to travel… the platform that lets me give back… and, most of all… the people I’ve met along the way.

Tennis... like life... is a team sport. Yes, you stand alone on your side of the net. But your success depends on your team. Your coaches, your teammates, even your rivals... all these influences help to make you who you are.

It’s not an accident that my business partnership with Tony is called “TEAM8.” A play on words... “Teammate.” All the work we do together reflects that team spirit... the strong bond we have with each other and our colleagues... with the athletes we represent... and with partners and sponsors. These personal relationships matter most.

I learned this way of thinking from the best... my parents. They’ve always supported me, always encouraged me, and always understood what I most wanted and needed to be.

A family is a team. I feel so very lucky that my incredible wife, Mirka... who makes every joy in my life even brighter... and our four amazing children, Myla, Charlene, Leo, and Lenny, are here with me today.

And more important, that we are here for each other every day.

Graduates, I know the same is true for you. Your parents, your families... they made the sacrifices to get you here... They have shared your triumphs and your struggles... They will always, always be in your corner.

And not only them. As you head out into the world, don’t forget: you get to bring all of this with you... this culture, this energy, these people, this color Green... The friends who have pushed you and supported you to become the best version of yourselves… the friends who will never stop cheering for you, just like today.

And you will keep making friends in the Dartmouth community... Possibly even today... So right now, turn to the people on your left and your right... Maybe this is the first time you have met. You might not share experiences or viewpoints, but now you share this memory. And a whole lot more.

When I left tennis, I became a former tennis player. But you are not a former anything.

You are future record-breakers and world travelers… future volunteers and philanthropists... future winners and future leaders.

I’m here to tell you... from the other side of graduation... that leaving a familiar world behind and finding new ones is incredibly, deeply, wonderfully exciting.

So there, Dartmouth, are your tennis lessons for the day.

Effortless is a myth.

Wait—wait—I got one more lesson.

President Beilock, can I have my racquet real quick?

OK, so, for your forehand, you’ll want to use an eastern grip. Keep your knuckles apart a little bit. Obviously, you don’t want to squeeze the grip too hard... switching from forehand to backhand should be easy... Also, remember it all starts with the footwork, and the take-back is as important as the follow-through.

No, this is not a metaphor! It’s just good technique.

Dartmouth, this has been an incredible honor for me.

Thank you for the honorary degree. Thank you for making me part of your really big day.

I’m glad I got to meet so many of you these past few days. If you are ever in Switzerland, or anywhere else in the world, and you see me on the street... even 20 or 30 years from now... whether I have gray hair or no hair... I want you to stop me and say... “I was there that day on the Green. I’m a member of your class... the Class of 2024.”

I will never forget this day, and I know you won’t either.

You have worked so hard to get here, and left nothing on the court... or the pong table.

From one graduate to another, I can’t wait to see what you all do next.

Whatever game you choose, give it your best.

Go for your shots. Play free. Try everything.

And most of all, be kind to one another... and have fun out there.

Congratulations again, Class of 2024!

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Aerial of paddle boards and swimmers in Lake Morey

I was trying to pass on the things that I learned about winning and losing, and dealing with those situations, and about a positive mindset, and travel and philanthropy.

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Admissions Group Visit Requests

Thank you for your interest in visiting Dartmouth College. To request a Group Visit for groups of 10 or more, please use the calendar below. Dartmouth College offers special group tours to high school groups, community based organizations (CBOs), and other non-profit organizations. Campus tours, with a student guide, are 60-75 minutes long. Group visits are available by request only; please be aware that a request form does not guarantee that your group visit will be approved. Please allow three days for our Group Visit Coordinator to respond to your request. The available times and dates listed on the calendar are when we are most likely able to accommodate group visits. If you were hoping to visit on a date that is not available, or if you have additional questions or special requests, please email our Group Visit Coordinator at [email protected] .

USC student arrested in fatal stabbing near campus won't be charged, DA says

A University of Southern California student will not be charged in the fatal stabbing of a car burglary suspect near campus, prosecutors said Thursday.

Ivan Gallegos, 19, of Los Angeles, was booked into jail on suspicion of murder early Tuesday and held on $2 million bail following the attack Monday night, police said.

The victim, Xavier Cerf, 27, was pronounced dead at the scene — an alley behind USC's Greek Row — shortly after the confrontation Monday evening, according to the DA's office and the county medical examiner.

police investigation aerial

A charge evaluation worksheet produced by the DA's office concluded that Gallegos should not be charged, mainly because he was acting in self-defense after he and two others said they heard the man say he had a gun.

"We believe that Mr. Gallegos’s actions were driven by a genuine fear for his life and the lives of others," District Attorney George Gascón said in a statement Thursday.

USC spokesperson Lauren Bartlett said Tuesday that Gallegos was enrolled as a junior studying business administration.

The evaluation says Gallegos was at a fraternity house where he lives when he and two other students heard a car alarm activate at the rear of the property, which faces an alley, about 8 p.m. Monday.

They went to investigate because there had been a string of car break-ins, the evaluation says. Gallegos had a knife, and another witness had a stick, it says.

They found the victim inside a 2010 Mercedes-Benz associated with the house, it says. When he was confronted, Cerf told the three that the vehicle had been calling to him, the document says.

The evaluation says the victim was homeless.

The man began to step out of the vehicle, and when Gallegos confronted him, he said he had a gun, the evaluation says. All three of the students who had gone to investigate the break-in said they heard the man say he had a gun, it says.

The evaluation says that two of three called 911 and that a man with a gun who was breaking into cars had been injured in a stabbing.

Gallegos said the victim started to reach for his waist, so he used his left hand to grab the man’s hands, believing he might have been trying to grab a gun, and stabbed him with his right hand, the evaluation says. He stabbed him three more times during a struggle, the document says.

He and the two companions returned to the house to wait for officers, it says. The evaluation says there was no indication the victim had a gun.

Jail records indicate Gallegos was arrested about a half-hour after officers arrived. He was released at 12:22 p.m. Thursday, according to the jail.

The victim’s mother, Yema Jones, told NBC Los Angeles he was a dancer and comedian who moved to Los Angeles from Texas. He was recently hospitalized for 20 days for an unspecified mental health ailment and had been released the day of his death. "I’m lost. I’m confused. I’m hurt," she said.

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Dennis Romero is a breaking news reporter for NBC News Digital. 

Alex Rozier is a reporter for NBC Los Angeles.

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  1. A Typical Friday at Dartmouth College

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  1. Campus Tours

    11:30 Rauner Library — Special Collection and the Arts. 13:28 The Irving Institute — Sustainability and Interdisciplinary Research. 15:50 Engineering and Computer Science Center — The Liberal Arts and Academics. 22:22 Baker-Berry Library — Academic Resources and Advising. 24:36 Fahey Hall — Residential and Greek Life On Campus.

  2. Visit Dartmouth

    Virtual information sessions (45 minutes) feature a member of our Admissions Office, current students, and live Q&A via Zoom. Engage in a conversation about what makes Dartmouth Dartmouth: its place, its people, and its program. Virtual campus tours (75 minutes) feature current students presenting live via Zoom. You will have the opportunity to ask questions in real-time and hear about student ...

  3. Visit

    More than 10,079 fans, including an eight-year record of more than 2,000 students, saw Dartmouth defeat Yale Saturday at Memorial Field in a 24-17 overtime victory.

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    Visit Dartmouth from the comfort of your own home! Our virtual tours are ready when you are. Check out our main campus tour, our engineering tour, and our athletics tour. Related Links: Visit Dartmouth. Apply. Connect with a Student. Areas of Study. Admissions Blog.

  5. Campus

    The sweeping 269-acre Dartmouth campus gathers into one walkable community a liberal arts college, a medical school, a school of engineering, a business school, athletic and arts complexes (including a world-class museum), plus a number of cafes and other dining options. ... Review campus maps or take a virtual tour of the campus. Big Green ...

  6. Tips for Visiting

    New England weather can be unpredictable, so be sure to check the Hanover, NH weather forecast. Campus tours are 75-minute walking tours—please dress for functional comfort. Layers are always a wise choice! We sometimes adjust for inclement weather. If there is a chance of rain, please bring an umbrella. Tours go out in all types of weather.

  7. Admissions Calendar & In-Person Event Sign-up New

    Admissions Calendar & In-Person Event Sign-up. Thank you for your interest in Dartmouth! To display and register for events, select an available date from the calendar. Available dates are highlighted in green. All events are in Eastern Time. In-Person Information Sessions and Campus Tours (1 hour and 45 minutes) In addition, engineering ...

  8. The Ultimate Dartmouth Campus Visit Guide

    The Ultimate Dartmouth Campus Visit Guide. When I toured Dartmouth College for the first time as a Bound recipient, I was enamored by the entire campus, but I would have liked to know more about minor things prior to my visit. ... Last but not least, explore beyond Dartmouth College's campus! The main street of Hanover is just a stone's throw ...

  9. Take A Virtual Tour of Campus

    The main Dartmouth campus stretches across 269 acres, including undergraduate and graduate schools, athletic and arts complexes, and nature preserves. Starti...

  10. Visit

    Thayer School of Engineering (Dartmouth Engineering) is located on Dartmouth's 269-acre main campus surrounded by pristine natural beauty. Dartmouth serves as an intellectual and cultural center for the town and surrounding communities, collectively called "The Upper Valley." View on Google Maps. 15 Thayer Drive, Hanover, NH 03755.

  11. Visting Dartmouth

    Hanover Area Chamber of Commerce: (603) 646-3115 (on their web site, go to the business directory section and choose the Accommodations category) Sunapee Lodging and Information Line: (800) 258-3530. NH Office of Travel and Tourism: (603) 271-2666. New England Innkeepers' Association: (603) 954-6689.

  12. Visitor Information

    Below, please find information and links to help you plan your visit to campus! We have included a selection of travel, lodging and area attractions for your convenience- please note that we do not recommend or endorse any particular options. Travel. Directions to Dartmouth; Parking on Campus; Campus Maps; Dartmouth Coach; Advance Transit

  13. Dartmouth Virtual Campus Tour

    Explore our campus with our tour guides Emil '25, Mariya '25, Michaela '25, and Simon '24.00:04 Meet Your Tour Guides02:43 Indigenous Excellence and Academic...

  14. Dartmouth College Campus Tour

    Dartmouth College Campus Tour . Overview Dartmouth College was founded in 1769 by Eleazer Wheelock, a puritan minister who wished to educate local Native Americans in reading, writing and Christianity. The college was established in the town of Hanover, New Hampshire, which had been chartered only eight years before. The college was situated ...

  15. Explore Dartmouth's Changing Campus Through a Virtual Tour

    Begin your interactive virtual tour at the West End of campus, exploring the largest construction project in Dartmouth's history, the $200 million Engineering and Computer Science Center. The Center is the second largest building on campus and only steps away from the 55,000-square-foot Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy and Society, which ...

  16. Tuck School of Business

    360° Virtual Tour. Walk the Tuck grounds from anywhere, anytime. Our 360° campus tour lets you explore points of interest on your desktop or mobile device. Start your virtual tour today. Take a TOUR Interactive Campus Map. ... ©, The Trustees of Dartmouth College.

  17. Dartmouth Tour Tuesdays

    Please indicate which tours you would like to attend, and we will confirm with location and other details. Tours may fill quickly, and we will maintain wait lists. July 2 nd. 11:30-12:30 53 Commons tour and lunch; 1:00-2:30pm Paleoanthropology (fossil human) lab; July 9 th. 11:30-12:30 53 Commons tour and lunch; 2:30pm-2:50pm Webster Cottage

  18. Paul Rudolph's Modernist Campus Tour

    In April 2023, UMass Dartmouth launched its first virtual walking tour featuring Brutalist architect Paul Rudolph and his monumental, heroic architecture. The goal was to develop a web and mobile-responsive architecture tour to increase campus and public awareness and knowledge of architect Paul Marvin Rudolph and his contribution to modernist ...

  19. Dartmouth College

    Accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), Dartmouth's MPH degree program is offered in two formats: 11 months on the Dartmouth campus, recognized as one of the most beautiful college campuses in the country, or 22 months online with five total week-long on-campus sessions in which you'll spend time exchanging ideas ...

  20. Reunions 2024 Take Unity to New Heights

    For every 1,000 gifts that the Dartmouth College Fund receives by June 30, generous alumni will add an additional $100,000 to the total raised for Dartmouth students. ... joined Chief Health and Wellness Officer Estevan Garcia in a packed room to discuss the attention to mental health on campus and Dartmouth's progress toward those ...

  21. Distribution

    Dartmouth must update the campus infrastructure to move hot water instead of steam to use new decarbonization technologies. The first phase of upgrades will occur between summer 2024 and winter 2025. These upgrades are strategic and necessary to enable a new energy facility that will be located in the southeast portion of campus.

  22. 2024 Commencement Address by Roger Federer

    Dartmouth's legendary football coach Buddy Teevens used to recruit players by telling their parents: "Your son will be a great football player when it's football time, a great student when it's academic time, and a great person all the time." That is what a Dartmouth education is all about. Tennis has given me so many memories.

  23. Testing Policy

    For Dartmouth, the evidence supporting our reactivation of a required testing policy is clear. Our bottom line is simple: we believe a standardized testing requirement will improve—not detract from—our ability to bring the most promising and diverse students to our campus.

  24. Academic Honor Principle (old)

    Policy Statement. The Academic Honor Principle was updated in June 2024; each degree program has an associated policy (consistent with the universal principle) and process for adjudicating alleged violations of that policy.

  25. Dartmouth College

    Explore our On-Campus MS Explore our Online MS Not sure which program is right for you? Use our comparison chart to learn the benefits each program has to offer. Program Highlights. Health Data Science is a crucial, rapidly growing field, blending biostatistics, programming, and advanced computational and classification algorithms like machine learning to address complex challenges within the ...

  26. Maps

    📍Mobile map: Navigate Dartmouth with this comprehensive, searchable map, optimized for use on internet-enabled mobile devices.. 📍Printable map: (1.3 MB PDF file, optimized for 11"x17" print size). 📍Google Maps: Dartmouth and the Upper Valley

  27. Dartmouth College

    To request a Group Visit for groups of 10 or more, please use the calendar below. Dartmouth College offers special group tours to high school groups, community based organizations (CBOs), and other non-profit organizations. Campus tours, with a student guide, are 60-75 minutes long. Group visits are available by request only; please be aware ...

  28. USC student arrested in fatal stabbing near campus won't be charged, DA

    A University of Southern California student will not be charged in the fatal stabbing of a car burglary suspect near campus, prosecutors said Thursday. Ivan Gallegos, 19, of Los Angeles, was ...

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  30. THE 10 BEST Dzerzhinsky Sights & Landmarks to Visit (2023)

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