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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese islands

The purpose of the project is to carry out a study into the sustainability of the Maltese tourism sector. It will identify the baseline situation, identify gaps and challenges, highlight opportunities, and propose recommendations. The latter will help facilitate further development and evolution of Malta’s tourism sector, which is a key economic sector. The study will recognise the impact Covid-19 has had, and will have, on the tourism sector in the short-medium term, especially in terms of existing and future bed supply, and the implications associated with over supply. It will facilitate continued policy dialogue with stakeholders and policymakers to present tangible recommendations improving the quality and sustainability of the sector, while limiting its social and environmental impact and enhancing its long-term growth in terms of jobs and skills. The study will also help inform a series of workshops targeting employees, focusing on the main areas which emerge from the study.

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Social Partners Discuss the Tourism Carrying Capacity Report in Malta at MCESD Meeting

During the fourth MCESD meeting this year, discussions centred on the detailed report prepared by the Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA), a member of the MCESD Council, regarding the country’s carrying capacity with a focus on tourism and associated infrastructure. Social partners provided meaningful reactions to Malta’s potential tourism capacity, as outlined in the report commissioned by MHRA and prepared by Deloitte Malta. The presentation took place before the entire MCESD Council, in the presence of Hon. Andy Ellul, the Parliamentary Secretary for Social Dialogue, and Hon. Clayton Bartolo, the Minister for Tourism.

The MHRA President, Mr. Tony Zahra, introduced the topic, emphasising the significant role of the tourism industry in Malta. He highlighted that the report indicated Malta would need to attract 4.7 million tourists to accommodate the planned increase in hotel accommodations. Mr. Zahra forecasted a 2.5% increase in tourists visiting Malta in 2024 compared to 2019.

During Deloitte Malta ‘s presentation by Mr. Michael Zarb, concerns regarding Malta’s capacity to handle increasing tourist numbers were expressed, particularly in crowded zones like beaches, historical sites, and urban centres. The report proposed prioritising tourism management in these areas and the implementation of visitation controls to mitigate adverse impacts on residents’ quality of life.

The report also raised concerns on the capacity of Malta’s infrastructure, notably the strained sewage system in key tourist areas. Existing volume levels were observed to negatively impact both the tourist experience and the residents’ quality of life. Challenges additional included environmental impacts, and workforce shortages. Recommendations centre on the choices available to Government to achieve sustainable tourism growth.

The social partners thanked the MHRA for commissioning the study, emphasising the necessity for robust and strategic planning to bolster tourism in the face of stiff competition. They endorsed initiatives and projects aimed at enhancing Malta’s appeal while addressing residents’ and the local labour force’s concerns. Stressing the importance of preserving the quality of life for Maltese and Gozitan residents, they urged comprehensive analysis and strategic planning in key areas including workforce, development, transport, and retail. Furthermore, the social partners highlighted the necessity for increased investments to improve accessibility in less frequented areas, particularly beaches. Waste management also emerged as a significant topic in the discussions among the social partners.

Minister Clayton Bartolo welcomed the social partners’ feedback and stressed the importance of balancing quality and quantity in tourism. He highlighted government initiatives to improve connectivity and draw more visitors, particularly from the American market and higher spending profile locations in Europe and Asia. However, he underlined that the Government has no plan to attract tourism volumes of 4.7 million as projected in the report, urging hoteliers to invest prudently given fierce competition.

The Parliamentary Secretary for Social Dialogue, Hon. Andy Ellul, remarked, “I am encouraged by the comprehensive discussions at the MCESD meeting, where the MHRA’s report shed light on Malta’s tourism challenges. It is imperative for us to balance growth with sustainability, taking into account the concerns raised by social partners, as we strive to enhance our appeal without compromising the quality of life for our residents.”

During the second part of the meeting, Kooperativi Malta were invited to the MCESD Council to present the contribution to Malta’s socio-economic development. The CEO of Kooperativi Malta, Mr. Daniel Schembri, highlighted the important role of cooperatives in various fields that sustain many social and economic enterprises and contribute to the socio-economic well-being of the nation. Social partners responded with enthusiasm to the efforts of Kooperativi Malta and appreciated the importance of collaboration on a number of initiatives.

  • You may access the presentation on the Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands here.
  • You can access the full report on the Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands here.
  • You may access the presentation on Kooperativi Malta from here.

carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

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Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands which report has been drawn up by its consultants Deloitte and financed primarily by EU funds.

A point which made the headlines, resulting from the said report, is relative to the availability of tourism accommodation, including touristic development which is still in the pipeline. Over the next five years, the report says, there is a significant risk of an over-supply in the expected accommodation growth. Various media reports have emphasised that as a result of the projected supply of touristic accommodation, close to 5 million tourists would be required (at an average 80 per cent occupancy throughout the year) to ensure the sector’s long-term profitability. Such an influx of tourists, definitely, cannot be handled by the country.

This is definitely the result of a lack of adequate land use planning. Unfortunately, the Planning Authority has continuously encouraged a free-for-all, particularly through the relaxation of various planning policies applicable to touristic accommodation. In fact, Tony Zahra, MHRA President, has been quoted as saying that we do not have a “Planning Authority” but a “Permitting Authority”.   For once, he is quite obviously right.

Unfortunately, this attitude of the Planning Authority is not limited to the touristic sector: it is spread throughout the islands relative to all types of development. It is an attitude which has contributed considerably towards “overcrowding, overdevelopment and uglification” which the Deloitte report groups together as being the contributors to the poor urban environment which impacts both residents and tourists indiscriminately!

An interesting point made by the Deloitte report is that the tourist sector is continuously decreasing in importance as the provider of employment opportunities for Maltese residents. In fact, the report states that, in 2009, 82 per cent of those employed in the tourism sector were Maltese. By 2019 this had decreased to 40.6 per cent. A staggering decrease in excess of 50 per cent!   The report does not offer any specific explanation for this. Reliance on poor remuneration of seasonal and part-time labour is a most obvious contributor to the situation. Its correction would inevitably cut the tourism sector down in size and consequently increase the problem of over-supply! The Deloitte report is generally silent about this basic flaw.

The quality of the touristic product is impacted considerably not only by the poor urban environment, which is getting progressively worse. It is also negatively impacted by the exponential increase in traffic and, litter. Deloitte also identify the lack of product authenticity as a contributor to the decreasing quality of the touristic product. This is the result of the lack of Maltese working in the sector!

The report also hints at turismophobia. It records the preoccupation of those residing in touristic areas. They are less enthusiastic about tourism when compared to those living in other areas which are not in continuous contact with the tourist.

This ties in with a study carried out by academics at the University of Malta, Lino Briguglio and Marie Avellino, who, in a paper published in 2020 and entitled Has over-tourism reached the Maltese Islands had pointed out the need for a tourism policy which focuses on mitigating its negative impacts.

Tourism is not an activity that happens in a vacuum. It takes place in a community of persons, who should be assured that their quality of life is not impacted negatively as a result of the experience.

Tourism is not just about the numbers of tourists who visit, or the millions of euro spent or its contribution to the Gross National Product: it is also about our quality of life.

The profitability to be addressed should not be limited to financial parameters. As tourism is not just about the tourist: it is about each one of us.

Carmel Cacopardo is Chairperson of ADPD

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Tourism Carrying Capacity

Client: deloitte ltd., project background.

Tourism is an important pillar of the Maltese Islands’ economy, providing significant direct and indirect financial benefits. The growth in tourism saw a rapid increase in the supply of bed stock, raising fears about whether there is an oversupply on such a small island, particularly whether the industry was on a sustainable growth trajectory.

One way to understand the problem was to devise a tourism carrying capacity for the island of Malta.

AIS Environment was tasked to identify the environmental impacts brought by the tourism industry on:

Landscape quality

Biodiversity

Carrying Capacity

As part of its work, AIS identified the relevant causal loops between tourism and the territorial context, linked and superimposed the effects of tourism within the territorial context and identified the carrying capacity metrics by which policy could be formulated.

The work carried out by AIS Environment is presented in the final report which is published here

Further reading: Comino Carrying Capacity

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Overtourism, Environmental Degradation and Governance in Small Islands with Special Reference to Malta

  • First Online: 24 November 2020

Cite this chapter

carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  • Lino Briguglio 4 &
  • Marie Avellino 4  

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This chapter briefly reviews the literature on tourism carrying capacity, sustainable tourism and overtourism, three concepts interlinked with each other, and are often used to stress the costs of tourism development as well as the need for good environmental governance. In the literature, environmental degradation is viewed as one of the downsides of tourism. The chapter presents an overview of the Maltese tourist industry and reports on a survey relating to overtourism in Malta. The results of the survey indicate that most respondents were of the view that overtourism exists in Malta leading to environmental degradation, and this in spite of the lip-service given to sustainable tourism in official government policy statements.

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See Mulvihill ( 2016 ), Scicluna ( 2017 ) and Dodds ( 2007 ) for a list of tourism downsides in Malta.

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Briguglio, L., Avellino, M. (2021). Overtourism, Environmental Degradation and Governance in Small Islands with Special Reference to Malta. In: Roberts, J.L., Nath, S., Paul, S., Madhoo, Y.N. (eds) Shaping the Future of Small Islands. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-4883-3_17

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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled  Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands   which report has been drawn up by its consultants Deloitte and financed primarily by EU funds.

A point which made the headlines, resulting from the said report, is relative to the availability of tourism accommodation, including touristic development which is still in the pipeline. Over the next five years, the report says, there is a significant risk of an over-supply in the expected accommodation growth. Various media reports have emphasised that as a result of the projected supply of touristic accommodation, close to 5 million tourists would be required (at an average 80 per cent occupancy throughout the year) to ensure the sector’s long-term profitability. Such an influx of tourists, definitely, cannot be handled by the country.

This is definitely the result of an lack of adequate land use planning. Unfortunately, the Planning Authority has continuously encouraged a free-for-all, particularly through the relaxation of various planning policies applicable to touristic accommodation. In fact, Tony Zahra, MHRA President, has been quoted as saying that we do not have a “Planning Authority” but a “Permitting Authority”.  For once, he is quite obviously right.

Unfortunately, this attitude of the Planning Authority is not limited to the touristic sector: it is spread throughout the islands relative to all types of development. It is an attitude which has contributed considerably towards “overcrowding, overdevelopment and uglification” which the Deloitte report groups together as being the contributors to the poor urban environment which impacts both residents and tourists indiscriminately!

An interesting point made by the Deloitte report is that the tourist sector is continuously decreasing in importance as the provider of employment opportunities for Maltese residents. In fact, the report states that, in 2009, 82 per cent of those employed in the tourism sector were Maltese. By 2019 this had decreased to 40.6 per cent. A staggering decrease in excess of 50 per cent!  The report does not offer any specific explanation for this. Reliance on poor remuneration of seasonal and part-time labour is a most obvious contributor to the situation. Its correction would inevitably cut the tourism sector down in size and consequently increase the problem of over-supply! The Deloitte report is generally silent about this basic flaw.

The quality of the touristic product is impacted considerably not only by the poor urban environment, which is getting progressively worse. It is also negatively impacted by the exponential increase in traffic and litter. Deloitte also identify the lack of product authenticity as a contributor to the decreasing quality of the touristic product. This is the result of the lack of Maltese working in the sector!

The report also hints at turismophobia. It records the preoccupation of those residing in touristic areas. They are less enthusiastic about tourism when compared to those living in other areas which are not in continuous contact with the tourist.

This ties in with a study carried out by academics at the University of Malta, Lino Briguglio and Marie Avellino, who, in a paper published in 2020 and entitled  Has over-tourism reached the Maltese Islands ?had pointed out the need for a tourism policy which focuses on mitigating its negative impacts. 

Tourism is not an activity that happens in a vacuum. It takes place in a community of persons, who should be assured that their quality of life is not impacted negatively as a result of the experience.

Tourism is not just about the numbers of tourists who visit, or the millions of euro spent or its contribution to the Gross National Product: it is also about our quality of life.

The profitability to be addressed should not be limited to financial parameters. As tourism is not just about the tourist: it is about each one of us.

Carmel Cacopardo ADPD Chairperson Published in The Malta Independent – Sunday 2 October 2022

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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

Tourism carrying-capacity in Malta

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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

Tourism carrying-capacity in Malta Living with Tourism. How many more tourists can Malta accept? Date:     Wednesday, 6 December 2017 Venue: Room 113 Old Humanities Building, University of Malta Msida Campus Time:    18:00 to 20:00 This seminar offers a contribution, on behalf of the University of Malta, to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation’s (UNWTO) 2017 celebrations for the ‘International Year of Sustainable Tourism Development’. The seminar is being jointly organised by the Islands and Small States Institute (ISSI) and the Institute for Tourism Travel and Culture (ITTC). Background. In the Maltese Islands a high proportion of GDP is derived from tourism. At the same time, tourism tends to generate various environmental and social pressures. In 2017 news headlines from across Europe including Barcelona, Dubrovnik, Iceland and Venice highlighted growing social unease as a result of high rates of tourist inflows. This seminar aims to explore these notions with a focus on the Maltese islands.  Chair: Professor Andrew Jones, Institute for Travel, Tourism and Culture, University of Malta   Introduction: Mr Julian Zarb,  Institute for Travel, Tourism and Culture, University of Malta. Panel Discussion: Dr Marie-Louise Mangion, Public Policy; University of Malta Professor Lino Briguglio, Islands & Small States Institute, University of Malta.  Mr Leslie Vella, Deputy Chief Executive Malta Tourism Authority Mr Adrian Attard, Malta Hotel and Restaurants Association Stakeholders in the tourism industry, associated professionals, students and other interested individuals are invited to attend this evening seminar, and to drinks that will follow the seminar. Attendance is free of charge but those wishing to attend are to inform Ms Romina Carabott on [email protected] or telephone numbers +356 2340 2117, +356 2134 4879 by not later than 4 December 2017.

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carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands which report has been drawn up by its consultants Deloitte and financed primarily by EU funds.

A point which made the headlines, resulting from the said report, is relative to the availability of tourism accommodation, including touristic development which is still in the pipeline. Over the next five years, the report says, there is a significant risk of an over-supply in the expected accommodation growth. Various media reports have emphasised that as a result of the projected supply of touristic accommodation, close to 5 million tourists would be required (at an average 80 per cent occupancy throughout the year) to ensure the sector’s long-term profitability. Such an influx of tourists, definitely, cannot be handled by the country.

This is definitely the result of an lack of adequate land use planning. Unfortunately, the Planning Authority has continuously encouraged a free-for-all, particularly through the relaxation of various planning policies applicable to touristic accommodation. In fact, Tony Zahra, MHRA President, has been quoted as saying that we do not have a “Planning Authority” but a “Permitting Authority”.  For once, he is quite obviously right.

Unfortunately, this attitude of the Planning Authority is not limited to the touristic sector: it is spread throughout the islands relative to all types of development. It is an attitude which has contributed considerably towards “overcrowding, overdevelopment and uglification” which the Deloitte report groups together as being the contributors to the poor urban environment which impacts both residents and tourists indiscriminately!

An interesting point made by the Deloitte report is that the tourist sector is continuously decreasing in importance as the provider of employment opportunities for Maltese residents. In fact, the report states that, in 2009, 82 per cent of those employed in the tourism sector were Maltese. By 2019 this had decreased to 40.6 per cent. A staggering decrease in excess of 50 per cent!  The report does not offer any specific explanation for this. Reliance on poor remuneration of seasonal and part-time labour is a most obvious contributor to the situation. Its correction would inevitably cut the tourism sector down in size and consequently increase the problem of over-supply! The Deloitte report is generally silent about this basic flaw.

The quality of the touristic product is impacted considerably not only by the poor urban environment, which is getting progressively worse. It is also negatively impacted by the exponential increase in traffic and litter. Deloitte also identify the lack of product authenticity as a contributor to the decreasing quality of the touristic product. This is the result of the lack of Maltese working in the sector!

The report also hints at turismophobia. It records the preoccupation of those residing in touristic areas. They are less enthusiastic about tourism when compared to those living in other areas which are not in continuous contact with the tourist.

This ties in with a study carried out by academics at the University of Malta, Lino Briguglio and Marie Avellino , who, in a paper published in 2020 and entitled Has over-tourism reached the Maltese Islands ? had pointed out the need for a tourism policy which focuses on mitigating its negative impacts. 

Tourism is not an activity that happens in a vacuum. It takes place in a community of persons, who should be assured that their quality of life is not impacted negatively as a result of the experience.

Tourism is not just about the numbers of tourists who visit, or the millions of euro spent or its contribution to the Gross National Product: it is also about our quality of life.

The profitability to be addressed should not be limited to financial parameters. As tourism is not just about the tourist: it is about each one of us.

published in The Malta Independent on Sunday: 2 October 2022

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IMAGES

  1. A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  2. Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  3. Carrying Capacity Methodology for Tourism

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  4. Inbound tourists visiting the Maltese Islands during (2015-2018 period

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  5. Tourism carrying capacity

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

  6. Tourism carrying capacity dimensions. Source: By author.

    carrying capacity study for tourism in the maltese islands

VIDEO

  1. MV Carrying Capacity Study Stakeholder Engagement meeting with USACE May 15, 2024

  2. Carrying a full sized cross for 21km/13 miles in aid of Puttinu Cares

  3. THE MALTESE ISLANDS

  4. #malta #maltese #marsaxlokk #tourism #funnyvideo

  5. The COLOURFUL doors of MALTA! 🇲🇹 🚪 🌈 #malta #travel #visitmalta #doors

  6. COMPLETE PROCESS FROM APPLICATION TO STUDY VISA MALTA

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands

    Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands In connection with our engagement contract dated 19th November 2021 (Contract reference no. MHRA/ESF/01/2021), we enclose our report for a Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands. We draw your attention to the Methodology section in the Annexure in

  2. Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    A presentation was delivered by Deloitte Malta during an MCESD Council Meeting on 2nd February, 2024. The presentation aimed to provide Social Partners with an update on the Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands, focusing on tourism and associated infrastructure. This study was commissioned by the MHRA. You can access the presentation […]

  3. PDF Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands

    Findings. The total number of Maltese working in the sector reduced from 7,974 in 2010 to 5,964 in 2019. In 2019, only around 40% of workers in the sector were Maltese. This: reduces the authenticity of the tourism product; adds infrastructure pressures (e.g traffic and sewage from population increase);

  4. PDF Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands

    Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands February 2024 Operational Programme II -European Structural and Investment Funds 2014-2020 "Investing in human capital to create more opportunities and promote the well-being of society" Project part-financed by the European Social Fund

  5. A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese islands

    A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese islands. The purpose of the project is to carry out a study into the sustainability of the Maltese tourism sector. It will identify the baseline situation, identify gaps and challenges, highlight opportunities, and propose recommendations. The latter will help facilitate further development ...

  6. A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has today issued a Call for Tenders as part of a project part-financed by the European Social Fund ESF 04.148 entitled: A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese Islands. The purpose of the project is to carry out a study into the sustainability of the Maltese tourism sector. It will ...

  7. Carrying Capacity Assessment for Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    (1) The GESC of island tourism destination is 0.6816, and the ecological deficit is 287849.0216 ha, with ecological carrying capacity being 46.71%, indicating that the Zhoushan Islands have ...

  8. Malta needs 4.7 million tourists to achieve 80% year-long occupancy

    The Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands, commissioned by the Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association and carried out by Deloitte, has also identified a series of issues ...

  9. PDF OCCASIONAL PAPERS ON ISLANDS AND SMALL STATES ISSN 1024-6282 Number

    Keywords: overtourism, tourism management, sustainable tourism, Maltese Islands, carrying capacity, resident attitudes 1. Introduction ... topics associated with the main theme of this study. A review of tourism developments in Malta between 2000 and 2018 is given in Section 3. Section 4 describes the survey

  10. OAR@UM: Carrying capacity assessment for tourism in the Maltese Islands

    Mangion, M. L. (2001). Carrying capacity assessment for tourism in the Maltese Islands. Valletta: Ministry of Tourism. Abstract: Tourism is a very substantial contributor to the creation of our nation's wealth. Popular consensus casts the industry in the role of a major player and prime motor of the Maltese economy.

  11. Social Partners Discuss the Tourism Carrying Capacity Report in Malta

    Stressing the importance of preserving the quality of life for Maltese and Gozitan residents, they urged comprehensive analysis and strategic planning in key areas including workforce, development, transport, and retail. ... You may access the presentation on the Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands here. You can access ...

  12. Carrying capacity exercise suggests Malta needs 4.7 million tourists to

    The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) presents the Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands by Deloitte Malta. A study commissioned by the Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) and conducted by Deloitte Malta, clearly shows that once all bed stock that has regulatory approval comes on line, that ...

  13. Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

    The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands which report has been drawn up by its consultants

  14. Tourism Carrying Capacity

    Tourism is an important pillar of the Maltese Islands' economy, providing significant direct and indirect financial benefits. The growth in tourism saw a rapid increase in the supply of bed stock, raising fears about whether there is an oversupply on such a small island, particularly whether the industry was on a sustainable growth trajectory.

  15. Overtourism, Environmental Degradation and Governance in Small Islands

    1.1 Objectives of the Study. The objectives of this chapter are twofold, namely (a) to present a literature review on themes associated with the title of this chapter, and (b) to report the results of a survey on the attitudes towards tourism in Malta (Briguglio and Avellino 2019), so as to examine whether overtourism exists in Malta and whether the Maltese people associate tourism with ...

  16. Projects

    Projects A Carrying Capacity Study of Tourism in the Maltese Islands EU Funded Project Ref. ESF 04.148 Project Description - The purpose of the project is to carry out a study into the sustainability of the Maltese tourism sector. It will identify the baseline situation, identify gaps and challenges, highlight opportunities, and propose recommendations. The […]

  17. Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

    Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report. 02/10/2022. The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands which report has been drawn up by its consultants Deloitte and financed primarily by EU funds. A point which made the headlines, resulting ...

  18. Carrying capacity assessment for tourism in the Maltese Islands

    Carrying capacity assessment for tourism in the Maltese Islands By: Ministry of Tourism Contributor(s): Malta Tourism Authority Material type: Text Publisher: Valletta : Malta Tourism Authority, 2001 Description: 38p ISBN: 9993262706 DDC classification: 338.479485

  19. Tourism carrying-capacity in Malta

    Background. In the Maltese Islands a high proportion of GDP is derived from tourism. At the same time, tourism tends to generate various environmental and social pressures. In 2017 news headlines from across Europe including Barcelona, Dubrovnik, Iceland and Venice highlighted growing social unease as a result of high rates of tourist inflows.

  20. Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands

    The Deloitte report published by the MHRA, in July 2022, entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands has pointed out that the total of existing and planned hotel accommodation would require approximately 5 million tourists per annum to ensure an 80 percent occupancy. This does not take into consideration non-hotel ...

  21. Systematic Literature Review on Methods of Assessing Carrying Capacity

    Carrying capacity is paramount to recreation and tourism management, which depends on sustainability between resource protection and experience quality. Many studies have examined carrying capacity from several perspectives, but the various methods of assessing carrying capacity have not yet been reviewed. The purpose of this study is to assess the methods of carrying capacity, their trend ...

  22. Home

    Associate Members Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese islands

  23. Tourism: reflections on the Deloitte report

    The Malta Hotels and Restaurants Association (MHRA) has just published a report entitled Carrying Capacity Study for Tourism in the Maltese Islands which report has been drawn up by its consultants Deloitte and financed primarily by EU funds.. A point which made the headlines, resulting from the said report, is relative to the availability of tourism accommodation, including touristic ...