• Find Your Representative
  • Electronic Files
  • Obtain Documents

Congressional Reports

Icon: Share using Facebook

Last updated on 04-03-2024

To print this page: Push Control + P on your keyboard To search this page: Push Control + F on your keyboard To help us improve this information: Click Feedback at the top of any page

Congressional Reports, 104th Congress to Present

Search Browse

Jump to: Sample Searches │ Sample URLs │ Metadata Fields and Values │ Congressional Reports Citation Patterns │ Related Resources

About Congressional Reports

What are Congressional Reports?

Congressional Reports originate from congressional committees and deal with proposed legislation and issues under investigation. Congressional Reports, along with Congressional Documents, are part of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set , commonly referred to as the Serial Set.

What is available?

  • govinfo contains select House, Senate, executive, and conference reports from the 104th Congress (1995-96) forward. Additional documents from previous congresses are also available.
  • The system is updated irregularly for the current Congress, as digital versions of the reports become available.
  • Reports are available as ASCII text and Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files.
  • Some reports may be available through other govinfo collections.

Types of Congressional Reports

House and Senate Reports

House and Senate Reports contain reports of congressional committees concerning proposed legislation and/or contain findings on matters under investigation.

Senate Executive Reports

Senate Executive Reports contain reports of the Committee on Foreign Relations relating to Treaties between the United States and foreign nations, which have been submitted to the U.S. Senate for ratification, or reports of various Senate Committees regarding nomination of individuals.

Conference Reports

Conference Reports are agreements on legislation that is negotiated between the House and Senate via conference committees. It is printed and submitted to each chamber for its consideration, such as approval or disapproval.

From the earliest days, differences on legislation between the House and Senate have been committed to conference committees to work out a settlement. The most usual case is that in which a bill passes one Chamber with amendments unacceptable to the other. In such a case, the Chamber that disagrees to the amendments generally asks for a conference, and the Speaker of the House and the Presiding Officer of the Senate appoint the “managers,” as the conferees are called. Generally, they are selected from the committee or committees having charge of the bill.

After attempting to resolve the points in disagreement, the conference committee issues a report to each Chamber. If the report is accepted by both Chambers, the bill is then enrolled and sent to the President. If the report is rejected by either Chamber, the matter in disagreement comes up for disposition anew as if there had been no conference. Unless all differences between the two Houses are resolved, the bill fails. (From “Our American Government”, H. Doc. 108-94, p. 34)

Searching Congressional Reports

You can locate Congressional Reports by:

  • Using the Basic Search for keyword and metadata fielded searches,
  • Using the Advanced Search ; fields specific to the CRPT will display after you select Congressional Reports in the Refine by Collection column,
  • Using the Citation Search to retrieve a single document in PDF format if you know the Congress number, report type and number, and doucment heading,
  • Narrowing search results by clicking on links in the Refine Your Search panel on the left hand side of the page (the sections under Refine Your Search correspond to the metadata available for the Reports), and
  • Browsing on the Congressional Reports browse page.

General govinfo Search Tips

Search Examples

Search by Congress Number and Chamber - These examples will search for reports from the House of Representatives from the 110th congress.

  • Using Basic Search, enter: collection:crpt and congress:110 chamber:house
  • Select Congressional Reports under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Congress Number in the first box and select 110 in the second box.
  • Click + Additional Criteria and select Chamber of Congress then select House of Representatives in the next box.

Search for Conference Reports by Keyword - These examples will search for conference reports with the keywords fire and safety .

  • Using Basic Search, enter: fire safety and confreport:true
  • Select Congressional Reports under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Conference Report in the first box and select True in the second box.
  • Click + Additional Criteria and enter fire safety in the next box.

Search by Report Number - These examples will search for reports with 640 as the report number.

  • Using Basic Search, enter: collection:crpt reportnum:640
  • Using Advanced Search, select Congressional Documents under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Report Number in the first box and enter 640 in the second box.

Search by Congress Member - These examples will search for reports with Reid as the congress member.

  • Using Basic Search, enter: collection:crpt and member:reid
  • Using Advanced Search, select Congressional Reports under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Congress Member in the first box and enter Reid in the second box.

Search by Keyword and Committee - These examples will search for reports from the agriculture, nutrition, and forestry committee with the keyword watershed

  • Using Basic Search, enter: watershed and collection:crpt and committee:"agriculture, nutrition, and forestry"
  • Select Congressional Reports under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Committee in the first box and enter "agriculture, nutrition, and forestry" in the second box.
  • Click + Additional Criteria and enter watershed

Search by Citation - These examples will search for House Report 110-640.

  • Using Basic Search, enter: collection:crpt and citation:"H. Rept. 110-640"
  • Using Advanced Search, select Congressional Reports under Refine by Collection, then under Search In select Citation in the first box and enter H. Rept. 110-640 in the second box.
  • Using Citation Search, select Congressional Reports from Select Collection box, select H. Rept. from Select Type box, select 110th Congress from Select Congress box, and enter 640 in the next box.

Sample Congressional Reports URLs

govinfo uses two key pieces of information to construct predictable URLs to reports and Details pages.

  • Package ID is used to identify an individual report.
  • Granule ID is used to identify volumes, parts or errata that may exist for a single report.

Tip: You can also use the link service and API to construct predictable links.

Details Page for a Congressional Report (Single Part or Volume) Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/ {Package ID} Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/CRPT-109srpt322

PDF File for a Congressional Report (Single Part or Volume) Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/ {Package ID}/pdf/{Package ID}.pdf Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CRPT-109srpt322/pdf/CRPT-109srpt322.pdf

HTML File for a Congressional Document (Single Part or Volume) Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/ {Package ID}/html/{Package ID}.htm Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CRPT-109srpt322/html/CRPT-109srpt322.htm

Details Page for a Part, Volume or Errata of a Congressional Document Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/ {Package ID}/{Granule ID} Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/CRPT-107srpt158/CRPT-107srpt158-vol2

PDF File for a Part, Volume or Errata of a Congressional Document Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/ {Package ID}/pdf/{Granule ID}.pdf Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CRPT-107srpt158/CRPT-107srpt158-vol2.pdf

XML File for a Part, Volume or Errata of a Congressional Document Structure: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/ {Package ID}/html/{Granule ID}.htm Example: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CRPT-107srpt158/html/CRPT-107srpt158-vol2.htm

Congressional Reports Metadata Fields and Values

Metadata fields and values can be used to increase the relevancy of your searches. Metadata fields and values are used throughout govinfo for:

  • Refining Your Search,
  • Browsing Government Publications,
  • Field Operators,
  • Advanced Search, and
  • Display on Details pages.

Metadata fields and values can be entered into the Basic Search box using field operators. The metadata fields and values available for Congressional Reports are listed in the table below, along with examples for each metadata field. Using Field Operators

Some of the metadata fields are made available for use in Advanced Search. The metadata values can be entered in the same format for the fields available on the Advanced Search Page. Using Advanced Search

Congressional Reports Citation Patterns

These patterns are available when creating searches using Congressional Reports citations.

In the Basic Search box, simply use one of the citation patterns listed in the Search Examples column below. If the report number value that you use is available on the website, the document will be returned.

*all terms in italics are newly accepted search patterns

Congressional Reports Related Resources

  • Featured House , Senate and Joint Publications - House or Senate select documents published by Congress or jointly by the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.
  • Conference Reports of the U.S. Congress - website for agreements on legislation that are negotiated between the House and Senate via conference committees.
  • Congressional Documents - Documents of congressional committees that cover a wide variety of topics and may include reports of executive departments and independent organizations, reports of special investigations made for Congress, and annual reports of non-governmental organizations.
  • Browse by Congressional Committee - Browse reports issued by individual committees, including Bills, Documents, and Hearings.
  • Contact your local Federal Depository Library - Federal Depository Library Directory
  • Purchase the Congressional Serial Set - From GPO's Online Bookstore

congressional travel report

House Committee on Ethics

House Committee on Ethics

Search form.

  • Committee Members
  • Committee Staff
  • Committee Events
  • Committee Jurisdiction
  • Committee History
  • Committee Advice
  • Committee Rules
  • Committee Jobs
  • Committee Statements
  • FAQs About Campaign Activity
  • FAQs About Gifts
  • FAQ About Casework
  • FAQs About Financial Disclosure
  • FAQs about Future Employment and Recusal
  • FAQs About Official Allowances
  • FAQs About Official and Outside Organizations
  • FAQs About Outside Employment
  • FAQs About Staff Rights and Duties
  • FAQs About Training
  • FAQs About Travel
  • Gifts Guidance
  • Gift Waivers
  • Gift Pink Sheets
  • Travel Guidance
  • Travel Regulations
  • Travel Forms
  • Travel Calculator
  • Travel Pink Sheets
  • Campaign Activity FAQs
  • Campaign Contributions and Contributors
  • Campaign Work by House Employees
  • General Prohibition Against Using Official Resources for Campaign or Political Purposes
  • Other Applicable Laws, Rules, and Standards of Conduct
  • Proper Use of Campaign Funds and Resources
  • Campaign Activity Pink Sheets
  • General Information About Financial Disclosure
  • Financial Disclosure Forms and Filing
  • Financial Disclosure Guidance
  • Periodic Transaction Report Calculator
  • Past Financial Disclosures
  • Retention of and Public Access to Reports
  • Specific Disclosure Requirements
  • Termination Reports
  • Common Financial Disclosure Mistakes
  • Financial Disclosure Pink Sheets
  • New Employee
  • Existing Employee
  • Senior Staff
  • Training Pink Sheets
  • Art Competition Form
  • Future Employment Forms
  • Forms for Members Practicing Medicine
  • STEM Competition
  • Solicitation Waiver
  • Teaching Forms
  • Legal Expense Fund Form
  • Outside Positions Forms
  • Committee Reports
  • General Advisories
  • Historical Documents
  • Press Releases
  • Summary of Activities

House Members and employees often receive invitations to travel, both in their official and personal capacities.  Except as the House gift rule (House Rule 25, clause 5) otherwise provides, such travel expenses are a gift to the Member, officer, or employee.  Like any other gift, travel expenses are subject to the basic gift prohibitions – including the prohibition against soliciting a gift – and they may be accepted only in accordance with the provisions of the gift rule.  Therefore, before accepting travel, a Member, officer, or employee should exercise special care to ensure compliance with the gift rule and other applicable laws, rules, and regulations.  For questions regarding travel, please contact the Committee’s Office of Advice and Education.

Public Citizen

JOIN THE MOVEMENT Get Updates Valid email is required

medium"> Donate

  • Giving Through Your Will
  • Gift of Stocks or Mutual Funds
  • Tax-Deductible Giving
  • Charitable Gift Annuities
  • Gifts From Your Retirement Account
  • Life Insurance Donations

What are you looking for? Search

August 9, 2019

Congressional Travel Rules

By Caralyn Esser and Craig Holman

Read the .PDF of Congressional Travel Rules

Travel by Members, Senators and congressional staff are subject to specific requirements described in the Rules of the House of Representatives and the Standing Rules of the Senate. Usually the travel regulations are similar for both houses of Congress, but the House and Senate separately approved rules governing privately-sponsored travel with minor differences.

According to the rules, travel expenses usually include transportation, lodging, food and refreshments, [1] but not expenditures for entertainment or recreational activities. [2] The travel rules are distinguished from the gift rules largely by geographical radius around the Capitol or a Member’s home district. Within a 35-mile radius of the Capitol or home district, the gift rules dominate. Outside that 35-mile radius, many of the gift rules, such as limits on expenditures for meals and hospitality, are superseded by the travel rules. [3] (Occasional travel expenses within the 35-mile radius are permitted for giving speeches.)

Types of Travel

Seven types of travel are governed by congressional rules:

  • Travel in connection with the individual’s official duties that is paid for by a private source;
  • Travel entirely unrelated to official duties that is paid for by a private source;
  • Travel entirely unrelated to official duties that is paid for by a personal friend;
  • Travel paid for by the Federal Government, or by a state or local government;
  • Travel paid for by a foreign government or an international organization;
  • Travel for a political purpose that is paid for by a political organization; and
  • Official travel paid for or authorized by the House or

All seven types of travel are subject to different sets of regulations that are summarized below.

I.A.   Officially Connected Travel Paid by a Private Source – General Requirements

Privately-sponsored travel for officially-related purposes is the type of travel that had been most commonly subject to abuse. This is where private entities – corporations, unions and other special interest groups – provide free transportation, meals and lodging for Members, Senators and staff for “officially-connected duties,” such as giving a speech to constituents, participating in a conference, or attending a fact-finding trip. Until passage of the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007 (S. 1), these trips often used to be little more than junkets, as lobbyists made use of the laxer travel rules to wine and dine Members, Senators and congressional staff on behalf of paying clients. Such abuses were the source of the new House and Senate travel rules restricting the role of lobbyists and lobbying organizations on officially- connected trips.

Today, a Member, Senator, or staff may accept travel expenses to attend a meeting, speaking engagement, fact-finding trip or similar event related to official duties, from a private source only if:

a) The private source is directly and immediately associated with the event and the location of the event bears a relationship to the officially-connected purpose of the trip. [4] When a non-profit organization, for instance, pays for officially-connected travel, the organization must (1) be publicly disclosed as a trip sponsor on the applicable travel disclosure forms and (2) be directly involved in the event. If the organization pays the travel expenses with donations that are earmarked, either formally or informally, for the trip, each such donor is deemed a “private source” for the trip and must be disclosed and intimately involved in the event. In terms of location, the rules distinguish between travel to locations arranged without regard to congressional participation, which is deemed presumptively reasonable, as opposed to travel arranged largely for congressional participation, which must be located at a site directly related to official business.

b)  The private source is not a registered lobbyist or a registered foreign agent. [5]

  • The prohibition against accepting travel expenses from a registered lobbyist, an agent of a foreign principal, or a lobbying firm applies even when the lobbyist, agent or firm will later be reimbursed for those expenses by a non-lobbyist
  • “Registered lobbyist” is any person registered under the [6]
  • “Foreign agent” covers any person registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, usually foreign governments or entities supported by foreign governments. [7] However, the Members, Senators and staff of Congress may accept some specific travel expenses from foreign agents subject to regulations of other types of travel – travel paid for by a foreign government or an international organization outside the United
  • Important additional requirements restricting the role of lobbying organizations are discussed

c)  Travel expenditures cover brief time periods. [8]

  • For the House it is limited to four days total for domestic trips and seven days for trips outside the United States, excluding days taken in whole or in part in traveling to and from the United
  • For the Senate the limits are three and seven days respectively (in both cases time of traveling is excluded).
  • A Member, Senator or staff can travel beyond the day limits if he or she is participating in consecutive but distinctive trips financed by different organizations, or he or she is willing to extend the trip at his or her own expense. In the latter case, the Member, Senator or staff may still accept return transportation.

d) The private source offers to cover only transportation, lodging and related expenses that are necessary to accomplish the purpose of the trip, and thus it may not always be proper to accept expenses for the full three-, four- or seven-day period. [9] The new House and Senate rules further stipulate that travel expenses should be “reasonable.” Reasonable expenses are defined as expenses commensurate with other attendees at an event that is organized without regard to congressional participation (e.g. academic conference), or expenses compatible with per diem rates for trips organized largely for congressional participation (e.g. fact-finding trip).

e) Travel expenditures regarding entertainment or recreational activities are generally not permitted. [10] However, Members, Senators and staff may accept such expenditures if they are provided to all attendees as an integral part of the event, or alternatively if they conform to the gift

f) No more than one relative accompanies a Member, Senator or employee of Congress at the expense of the private sponsor. [11] A Member, Senator or staff may accept payment from a private sponsor for the expenses of one relative only, not a spouse and a child. However, the Member, Senator or staff can be accompanied by other individuals at his or her own expense.

This provision has recently come under closer scrutiny for its tax implications. The IRS requires that payments by a private source for the travel of a family member, if the family member is not serving a bona fide business purpose, as additional income to the recipient, subject to tax. Public Citizen filed a complaint with the IRS alleging that many, if not all, Members, Senators and staff routinely fail to report this income and pay taxes on it. The congressional ethics committees have no rule or advice to Members, Senators and staff of the potential tax implications of family travel paid for by a third party.

g) After each trip taken by a Member, Senator or staff a travel disclosure form that lists the expenses by the private source must be completed, signed and filed with the Clerk of the House or the Secretary of the Senate. [12] The form must include good faith estimates of the transportation, lodging, meal and other expenses paid, set out separately, and a determination that such expenses were ‘necessary’ and related to the individual’s official duties. In the House, this disclosure form must be filed within 15 days of returning from the trip. In the Senate, the disclosure form must be filed within 30 days of the trip. Furthermore, Members, Senators and officers, as well as employees who file a Financial Disclosure Statement, must also disclose each such trip on Schedule VII of their annual financial disclosure

I.B.   Officially Connected Travel Paid by a Private Source – Specific Requirements Relative to Different House and Senate Rules

a) Trips sponsored by lobbying organizations [13]

1.In the House , a private entity that retains or employs a lobbyist is prohibited from sponsoring officially-connected travel , except in the following limited circumstances:

  • The trip is pre-approved by the ethics
  • The trip is for a one-day event, exclusive of travel time and one night’s
  • A second night’s stay may be permitted if it is necessary to accomplish the purpose of the one-day
  • An institution of higher education, even if it hires a lobbyist, is exempt from the one-day trip.

2.In the Senate , registered lobbyists and the entities that employ them are prohibited from sponsoring officially-connected travel, except in the following limited circumstances:

  • The trip is pre-approved by the ethics committee
  • The trip is necessary to participate in a one day (travel time excluded) meeting or speaking engagement, fact-finding trip or similar
  • A second night’s stay may be permitted if it is necessary to accomplish the purpose of the trip.
  • A 501(c)(3) charity, even if it hires a lobbyist, is exempt from the one-day trip

b)  Lobbyist participation in travel events [14]

  • In the House , registered lobbyists are prohibited from participating in travel events, except for de minimis Even for permissible one-day events sponsored by a lobbying organization, a lobbyist may participate in meetings at the destination of the trip, but the lobbyist cannot accompany the Member or staff on the travel; organize, finance or arrange the trip; or participate in more than a negligible fashion in the event. This restriction on lobbyist participation does not apply to an event sponsored by an institution of higher learning. Nevertheless, registered lobbyists and agents of foreign principals may not directly finance any trips.
  • In the Senate , registered lobbyists may not plan, organize, arrange or participate in officially-connected trips except for de minimis Even for permissible one-day events sponsored by a lobbying organization, a lobbyist may participate in meetings at the destination of the trip, but the lobbyist cannot accompany the Senator or staff on the travel; organize, finance or arrange the trip; or participate in more than a negligible fashion in the event. This restriction on lobbyist participation does not apply to events sponsored by a 501(c)3 charity. However, the restriction does apply to events sponsored by charities. Nevertheless, registered lobbyists and agents of foreign principals may not directly finance any trips.

c)  Transportation of Members and Senators by corporate jets [15]

  • In the House , Members may not use official, personal or campaign funds to pay for the use of privately-owned aircraft on trips, unless the aircraft is owned by the Member, a family member or a personal friend. Since privately-sponsored trips are considered reimbursement to the House, a private entity may not supply a private jet at no cost for an officially-connected trip. A sponsor may pay for up to business-class transportation on commercial aircraft or rail. A private source may provide charter fare or first-class fare only if it can be demonstrated necessary to accommodate a disability, security concerns, or other exceptional
  • In the Senate , Members and employees are required to pay full market value for airfares (charter rates) for flights on private jets not operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), except if the aircraft is owned or leased by the Senator involved or an immediate family member of the Senator (including an aircraft owned by an entity that is not a public corporation in which the candidate or an immediate family member of the candidate has an ownership interest), so long as the Senator does not use the aircraft more than the candidate’s or immediate family member’s proportionate share of ownership allows. The term `immediate family member’ means, with respect to a Senator, a father, mother, son, daughter, brother, sister, husband, wife, father-in-law, or mother-in-law.

d)  Formal approval of trips [16]

  • In the House , all privately-sponsored trips for Members and staff must be pre-approved by the House ethics committee . The committee must certify both the sponsor and the nature of the trip prior to travel. The sponsor must submit written certification that it will abide by all the conditions and restrictions regarding the payment, arranging and participation in the event. Members and staff must also receive written approval that the trip complies with the restrictions on duration, location and purpose of congressional travel. Pre-approval authorizations are made immediately available to the public. Post-travel disclosure of expenses is required within 15 days after the traveler
  • In the Senate , all privately-sponsored trips for Senators and staff must be pre-approved by the Senate ethics committee. The committee must certify both the sponsor and the nature of the trip prior to travel. The sponsor must submit written certification that it will abide by all the conditions and restrictions regarding the payment, arranging and participation in the event.

Senators and staff must also receive written approval that the trip complies with the restrictions on duration, location and purpose of congressional travel. Pre-approval authorizations are made immediately available to the public. Post-travel disclosure of expenses is required within 30 days after the traveler returns.

II.   Travel Unrelated to Official Duties and Paid by a Private Source [17]

A Member, Senator or employee of Congress may accept transportation, lodging, meals and other benefits unrelated to official duties paid for by a private source if it is related to outside business or employment. This type of travel is not as strictly regulated as officially connected travel – it is not subject to time limits, the limitation that only one relative may accompany, or the prohibition on recreational activities.

But two important restrictions still apply:

  • The travel benefits may not have been offered or enhanced because of the official position of the Member, Senator or staff
  • The benefits must be identical to those customarily provided to others in similar business circumstances.

Unlike officially-connected travel, the travel expenditures unrelated to official duties should not be reported on the 15-day travel disclosure forms filed with the Clerk of the House or the 30-day travel disclosure forms filed with the Secretary of the Senate. But unofficial travel funded by a private source that exceeds $250 in value in a calendar year must be reported on Schedule VII of the annual Financial Disclosure Statements of Members and those employees required to file an annual statement.

III.   Travel Unrelated to Official Duties and Paid by Personal Friend [18]

This kind of travel is subject to regulations imposed on other unofficial travel paid for by a private source (see above). In addition, if travel expenditures exceed $250 in value they may not be accepted on the basis of personal friendship unless the ethics committee issues a written determination that the personal friendship provision applies. Therefore, Members, Senators and congressional staff should submit an advance written request to the Committee. This request and the Committee’s response are confidential. Usually, travel paid for on the basis of personal friendship that exceeds $250 in value should be reported on the annual Financial Disclosure Statement but under some circumstances the Committee may waive the reporting requirement.

IV.   Travel Paid for by Federal, State or Local Government [19]

The gift rules of both houses of Congress allow accepting travel from any governmental entity in the United States. This type of travel is not considered a gift and does not have any regulations regarding trip duration, spouses or children. Such trips don’t have to be disclosed on either the travel disclosure forms or on annual Financial Disclosure Statements.

V.   Travel Paid for by a Foreign Government or International Organization [20]

The U.S. Constitution prohibits Members, Senators and employees of Congress from receiving gifts including travel, from a foreign state or its representative without the consent of Congress. That’s why Congress has consented to the acceptance of travel by the officials only in limited circumstances – under the provisions of the Foreign Gifts and Decorations Act (FGDA) and the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act (MECEA). Both acts contain very complicated and distinctive sets of regulations. The basic features include:

Foreign Gifts and Decorations Act:

  • Any travel paid for by a foreign government under FGDA regulations must relate directly to the official duties of the Member, officer, or
  • That Act defines the term of “foreign government” to include not only foreign governments per se but also international or multinational organizations whose membership is composed of units of foreign governments, and any agent or representative closely affiliated with such a government or organization while acting as such.
  • The trip must take place totally outside of the United States to be consistent with the interests of the United States and be permitted by the Standards
  • Travel expenses for an accompanying spouse or dependent may be accepted.
  • Travel is usually subject to the seven-day limit when it is taken in connection with a trip that is otherwise paid for with private
  • Such travel expenses should be disclosed within 30 days after leaving the host country in a special form filed with the ethics committee, but they should not be reported on the annual Financial Disclosure

Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act:

  • This Act applies to travel related to cultural exchange programs that finance visits and interchanges between the United States and other
  • Members and congressional staff may accept travel expenses from a foreign government in order to participate in MECEA programs approved by the Director of the United States Information
  • Such travel expenses are not considered gifts and are to be paid by the sponsoring government, not by any private
  • Under MECEA, the traveling Member, officer or employee may not accept travel expenses for a spouse or
  • Travel expenses associated with approved exchange cultural programs do not need to be disclosed on the travel disclosure forms, but they must be reported on the annual Financial Disclosure Statement.

VI.   Travel Paid for by a Political Organization [21]

A Member, Senator or employee of Congress may accept travel expenses provided by a political organization or party committee in connection with a fundraising or campaign event sponsored by that organization. These are campaign trips in support of a candidate or party committee. If expenses are paid for by the political organization, it is considered either an in-kind contribution from the political organization to the campaign or a party expenditure. The travel expenses may also be paid for or reimbursed by the campaign itself. These expenses are not to be reported on the travel disclosure forms. The expenses need be reported on the annual Financial Disclosure Statement of the Member or staff only if that travel is not filed with the Federal Election Commission.

VII.   Official Travel Paid for or Authorized by the House or Senate [22]

Official travel usually includes travel paid for out of Congressional funds, as well as the travel of Members, Senators or staff abroad as part of an official delegation. All official travel must be paid for or authorized by the House or Senate. A private source generally may not pay any portion of the expenses of a trip having an official purpose. Official travel is not to be reported either on the travel disclosure forms or on the annual Financial Disclosure Statement. There are surprisingly few regulations, and very little oversight and public disclosure, of official taxpayer funded travel.

VIII.   CODEL Reforms

In May of 2010, the former speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi issued new limits for House members. The new limits restrict members of the house from flying business-class unless the scheduled flight time exceeds 14 hours. Members of committees must seek authorization for travel for oversight purposes. The Speaker made a point to emphasize that DOD aircraft support is extremely limited and stipulated that it be requested through the Office of Interparliamentary Affairs and not the DOD directly. Finally, the new rules designate a quarterly filing period in which travel expenditures must be disclosed to the Clerk of the House [ 23 ].

Prepared by Bryan Kappe, Public Citizen (May 2011)

Making Government Work

Protecting Democracy : Ethics & Lobbying Reform , Money in Politics

You might be interested in

Revolving congress: the revolving door class of 2019 flocks to k street.

May 30, 2019

A Key Cog in Charles Koch’s Master Plan

June 3, 2019

Caught in the Crosshairs of Corporate Power: How Americans are Harmed When They Lack a Voice in Washington

March 5, 2019

Gift Rules for the Executive Branch

Stay updated on public citizen, follow public citizen, support our work.

congressional travel report

An official website of the United States government

Here’s how you know

congressional travel report

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock A locked padlock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

CBP Seal, U.S. Customs and Border Protection:  U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Links to CBP.gov homepage

  • Documents Library

CBP Trade and Travel Fiscal Year 2022 Report

U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s mission of protecting the borders of the United States and facilitating legitimate trade and travel is not only a critical component of national security, it is also a significant driving force of the country’s economic prosperity. CBP is committed to publishing the results of its key trade and travel programs and operations. This report summarizes CBP’s Fiscal Year 2022 trade and travel facilitation and enforcement efforts.

Update May 10, 2024

Information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

  • Travel Advisories |
  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

Find U.S. Embassies & Consulates

Travel.state.gov, congressional liaison, special issuance agency, u.s. passports, international travel, intercountry adoption, international parental child abduction, records and authentications, popular links, travel advisories, mytravelgov, stay connected, legal resources, legal information, info for u.s. law enforcement, replace or certify documents, external link.

You are about to leave travel.state.gov for an external website that is not maintained by the U.S. Department of State.

Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message.

You are about to visit:

Biden administration acknowledges possible Israeli weapons misuse in report to Congress

congressional travel report

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration acknowledged Friday that Israel likely used U.S.-made arms to inflict a higher number of civilian casualties in Gaza than is broadly deemed acceptable but stopped short of saying the close ally had violated U.S. weapons policy or international humanitarian law.

The State Department found that it is "reasonable to assess" that there are possible violations with hundreds of investigations open. But it could not definitively assess violations occurred, a senior State Department official who requested anonymity to discuss the unclassified document said.

The report covers the period through late April. It was transmitted to lawmakers on Friday afternoon.

In the report the Biden administration argued that a lack of U.S. government personnel on the ground and Hamas' penchant for hiding behind civilian populations made it "difficult to assess or reach conclusive findings onindividual incidents."

"Nevertheless, given Israel’s significant reliance on U.S.-made defense articles, it is reasonable to assess that defense articles covered under NSM-20 have been used by Israeli security forces since October 7 in instancesinconsistent with its IHL obligations or with established best practices for mitigating civilian harm," the report said.

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

The report itself was not expected to force changes but the State Department official said it has allowed the U.S. to go to Israel and ask for specifics. There are still information gaps that the U.S. is pushing Israel to close, the official said.

The report's release follows several days of delay and a warning from Biden to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that the U.S. would put an indefinite pause on weapons that have been used in civilian populations.

White House national security spokesman John Kirby said Friday afternoon that President Joe Biden was "aware of the contents" of the report and was "fully briefed on it" but would not say when the commander in chief was read in.

The State Department missed an original deadline of Wednesday to submit the report to Congress. Biden had pledged to provide an initial report by May 8 on U.S. weapons transfers in a national security memorandum he issued in February. Reports are due once annually after that.

Biden's memo in February called on the secretary of state "to obtain certain credible and reliable written assurances from foreign governments" receiving U.S. weapons and pledges his administration will "provide periodic congressional reports to enable meaningful oversight."

The pledge came amid a push from Democratic lawmakers for the Biden administration to press Israel on the treatment of civilians in Gaza.

In addition to Israel, the State Department says it "sought and obtained credible and reliable assurances" from the governments of Colombia, Iraq, Kenya, Nigeria, Somalia and Ukraine that they were meeting the criteria, too.

"While in some countries there have been circumstances over the reporting period that raise serious concerns, the (U.S. government) currently assesses the assurances provided by each recipient country to be credible and reliable so as to allow the provision of defense articles covered under NSM-20 to continue," the report said.

Biden said Wednesday that he would not send heavy payload bombs, artillery shells and other offensive weapons to Israel that have been used in population centers in Gaza with Netanyahu's government considering a major ground invasion in Rafah, where more than 1 million Palestinians had taken refuge. The southern Gaza city was facing a mass exodus on Friday as the Israeli military and Hamas militants battled on its edges.

His administration has vowed to continue providing Israel with defensive weapons.

Human rights experts have accused Israel's military of crossing the line in its war against Hamas. Gaza's Hamas-run health ministry says more than 34,500 Palestinians have died since the war began on Oct. 7.

Amnesty International assessed in a late April report that Israel had used U.S.-supplied weapons to engage in "serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, and in a manner that is inconsistent with U.S. law and policy." The organization called on the Biden administration to suspend the transfer of weapons to Israel over the alleged misuse and denials of humanitarian assistance to civilians.

A former State Department official, who quit last year over concerns the U.S. stance on the Israel-Hamas war, is helping to lead an independent task force. The group sent a report to the Biden administration last month accusing Israel of a "systematic disregard for fundamental principles of U.S. and international law."

State addressed the allegations in its Friday report, writing that while Israel asserts that it has taken steps to protect civilians, human rights groups deemed "Israeli civilian harm mitigation efforts as inconsistent, ineffective, and inadequate, failing to provide protection to vulnerable civilians who cannot or chose not to relocate."

"While Israel has the knowledge, experience, and tools to implement best practices for mitigating civilian harm in its military operations, the results on the ground, including high levels of civilian casualties, raise substantial questions as to whether the IDF is using them effectively in all cases," the report stated.

The distribution of humanitarian aid also continues to be a serious problem, the State Department said in a summary of the report's key findings. However, it did not assess that the Israeli government was intentionally fueling the crisis or violating U.S. law.

"While the U.S. has had deep concerns during the period since October 7 about action and inaction by Israel that contributed significantly to a lack of sustained and predictable delivery of needed assistance at scale, and the overall level reaching Palestinian civilians – while improved – remains insufficient, we do not currently assess that the Israeli government is prohibiting or otherwise restricting the transport or delivery of U.S. humanitarian assistance within the meaning of section 620I of the Foreign Assistance Act," the summary said.

The Center for American Progress, which typically agrees with Biden but has broken with the administration on Israel policy, chided the State Department over the findings in a statement Friday from its president and CEO Patrick Gaspard.

"It’s hard to believe that the administration sees what’s happening in Gaza yet fails to conclude that Israel has violated the terms for use of American weapons," Gaspard said.

Senator Jim Risch, R-Idaho, the ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee accused Biden's administration of "trying to have it both ways" in a statement.

“NSM-20 is aimed squarely at Israel in the near-term, but the additional highly politicized reporting requirements will eventually be aimed at other American allies and partners across the globe, further impeding the delivery of security assistance and undermining our ability to deter China and Russia," Risch said.

Maryland Democratic Sen. Chris Van Hollen, who was behind the push by lawmakers for written assurances, also told reporters the report "contradicts itself." It acknowledges that there is evidence that Israel broke the law but "the administration ducked all the hard questions" about whether action is needed, Van Hollen said.

"If this conduct complies with international standards, God help us all, because that would set a very low bar for what is allowed," he added. "I think what they're trying to do is make clear that they recognize how bad the situation is, but they don't want to have to take any action to hold the Netanyahu government accountable for what's happening."

Contributing: Riley Beggin

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Senate Approves Bill to Reauthorize F.A.A. and Improve Air Travel

The Senate also passed a short-term extension of the current F.A.A. law to give the House time to clear the longer-term package early next week.

A traveler walks through an airport. Delta airplanes are seen through a window in the background.

By Kayla Guo

Reporting from the Capitol

The Senate on Thursday passed legislation to reauthorize federal aviation programs for the next five years and put in place new safety measures and consumer protections for passengers, at a moment of intense uncertainty and disruption in the air travel system.

The bill , which still must win final approval in the House before becoming law, would provide more than $105 billion to the Federal Aviation Administration and another $738 million to the National Transportation Safety Board for airport modernization, technology programs and safety. It would also bolster the hiring and training of air traffic controllers, codify airlines’ refund obligations to passengers, ensure fee-free family seating and strengthen protections for passengers with disabilities.

“Aviation safety has been front of mind for millions of Americans recently, and this F.A.A. bill is the best thing Congress can do to give Americans the peace of mind they deserve,” Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the majority leader, said on the Senate floor on Thursday evening.

It passed in an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 88 to 4, just one day before the current law is scheduled to lapse. The Senate also unanimously approved a short-term extension to allow time for the House to take up and clear the longer-term package next week, a step that would send it to President Biden.

The legislation is a bipartisan compromise negotiated over months by the Senate and House committees with jurisdiction over the F.A.A., after Congress authorized several short-term extensions of the agency when lawmakers failed to meet earlier deadlines. The House passed its version of the bill almost a year ago in a lopsided vote of 351 to 69.

Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington, chairwoman of the Commerce Committee, celebrated the bill’s provisions on consumer protections, aviation safety, air traffic controllers, airport infrastructure and work force development on the floor after passage.

“This is a big moment for aviation,” Ms. Cantwell said. “We have had safety issues and concerns that we need to make a big investment. This legislation is that investment — in safety standards, in protecting consumers and advancing a work force and technology that will allow the United States to be the gold standard in aviation.”

Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, the top Republican on the Commerce Committee, said: “This legislation is a strong, bipartisan, bicameral bill that includes hundreds of priorities for senators and representatives, both Republican and Democrat. This bill gives the FAA the safety tools it needs at a critical time.”

As one of the few remaining bills considered a must-pass item this year, the F.A.A. package, which prompted several regional disputes, became a magnet for dozens of amendments and policy riders that threatened to delay it in the Senate.

With the legislation threatening to stall, the House on Wednesday approved a one-week extension for the F.A.A. before leaving Washington for the weekend. The Senate followed suit on Thursday, steering around lingering disputes that had threatened to scuttle the effort and cause a brief lapse for the F.A.A.

The debate came at a time of acute uncertainty about the aviation system, which has had a recent spate of concerning episodes such as dangerous near collisions on runways, plane malfunctions and thousands of flight delays and cancellations.

It was unclear for much of Thursday whether the Senate would be able to push through the legislation and the extension, as senators demanded votes on amendments or threatened to block speedy passage. No amendments were ultimately brought to a vote.

The most intense regional fight was over a provision in the bill that would add five round-trip long-haul flights out of Ronald Reagan National Airport outside Washington. Proponents, which include Delta Air Lines, have said they want to expand access to the nation’s capital and increase competition.

The proposal incensed lawmakers representing the area , who argued that the airport maintains the busiest runway in the country and cannot support additional flights. Senators Tim Kaine and Mark Warner of Virginia and Benjamin L. Cardin and Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, all Democrats, filed an amendment to strike the new flights.

Mr. Kaine and Mr. Warner threatened to hold the bill up if they did not receive a vote. But Mr. Cruz blocked an effort to bring up a compromise amendment that would have given the transportation secretary the final say on new flights after considering any effects they would have on delays and passenger safety.

“The Senate abdicated its responsibility to protect the safety of the 25 million people who fly through D.C.A. every year,” Mr. Kaine and Mr. Warner said in a statement. “Some of our colleagues were too afraid to let the experts make the call. They didn’t want to show the American people that they care more about a few lawmakers’ desire for direct flights than they care about the safety and convenience of the traveling public. That is shameful and an embarrassment.”

The senators from Virginia and Maryland were the only votes against the bill.

Another group of senators failed to secure a vote on a proposal to halt the Transportation Security Administration’s expansion of facial recognition technology at airports and restrict it where it is in use.

Senators had also proposed adding a number of unrelated bills, including one that would compensate people harmed by exposure to the nation’s nuclear weapons program , legislation to fully fund the replacement of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, and a credit card competition measure. Senators Marsha Blackburn, Republican of Tennessee, and Richard Blumenthal, Democrat of Connecticut, were pushing for a vote on their bill to protect minors online into Thursday. None of them made it into the final product.

An earlier version of this article misstated the name of the bridge in Baltimore that collapsed. It is the Francis Scott Key Bridge, not the Francis Key Scott Bridge.

How we handle corrections

Kayla Guo covers Congress for The New York Times as the 2023-24 reporting fellow based in Washington. More about Kayla Guo

A Divided Congress: Latest News and Analysis

Marjorie Taylor Greene: The hard-right congresswoman from Georgia failed spectacularly in her bid to depose Speaker Mike Johnson. But for a figure who sees her power in creating chaos, the loss was the point .

Reauthorize FAA and Improve Air Travel: The Senate passed legislation to reauthorize federal aviation programs and put in place new safety measures and consumer protections, at a moment of intense uncertainty  and disruption in the air travel system.

Mike Johnson: The House speaker easily batted down an attempt  by Greene to oust him from his post, after Democrats linked arms with most Republicans  to block the motion.

Antisemitism Hearing: A Republican-led House committee turned its attention to three of the most politically liberal school districts  in the country, accusing them of tolerating antisemitism, but the district leaders pushed back forcefully .

Legalizing Marijuana: Senate Democrats reintroduced broad legislation to legalize cannabis on the federal level, a major policy shift with wide public support , but it is unlikely to be enacted this year ahead of November’s elections and in a divided government.

Read the Latest on Page Six

trending now in US News

Trump blasts Biden as 'total moron' before historic crowd of 100K at NJ rally

Trump blasts Biden as 'total moron' before historic crowd of 100K...

Trump flies VP contender with him to massive Wildwood, NJ rally

Trump flies VP contender with him to massive Wildwood, NJ rally

Meghan Markle ignites fierce debate over questionable dress worn ‘’ during Nigeria trip: ‘Done as a snub’

Meghan Markle ignites fierce debate over questionable dress worn...

Mom mauled to death by pack of 'aggressive dogs' that targeted her kids — days before Mother's Day

Mom mauled to death by pack of 'aggressive dogs' that targeted...

Mom of sicko seen in gut-wrenching video lasso woman before sex assault says she ‘facilitated’ his arrest

Mom of sicko seen in gut-wrenching video lasso woman before sex...

Queers for Palestine block exit to Disney World, infuriating drivers before they're promptly arrested

Queers for Palestine block exit to Disney World, infuriating...

Concertgoer partially paralyzed after singer's stage dive into crowd at NY show

Concertgoer partially paralyzed after singer's stage dive into...

96-year-old 'Bumma' turns tables on relentless scam callers trying to swindle her: 'I'm going to be raptured'

96-year-old 'Bumma' turns tables on relentless scam callers...

Rep. nancy mace accuses former staffers of ‘sabotaging’ her as ex-employee claims she’s ‘unwell’: report.

  • View Author Archive
  • Get author RSS feed

Thanks for contacting us. We've received your submission.

Rep. Nancy Mace (R-SC) lashed out at her former staffers Friday, accusing them of hacking her phone, mismanaging funds and destroying electronic devices as part of an effort to sabotage her tenure in Congress. 

“I knew that they were sabotaging the office for a while,” the South Carolina Republican told the Daily Mail . “I didn’t know to the extent that they were doing it.

“They were signing my name on documents they didn’t have permission to do — one of them submerged their electronic devices under water so we couldn’t access their files. They deleted files, some of them deleted files off our server, so there’d be no documentation for the new staff that were coming in,” the 46-year-old alleged. 

Nancy Mace

The 46-year-old congresswoman’s office has been plagued by staff departures since her October 2023 vote to oust former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.). 

Between December 2023 and February 2024, nine of Mace’s staff members left her office , the outlet reported.  

Former employees have described the work environment in Mace’s office as “toxic,” even alleging that the congresswoman would openly discuss her sex life with her ex-fiancé. 

In January, her former chief of staff, Dan Hanlon, launched a short-lived bid to primary her in South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District but ended his campaign two months later. 

Mace claimed that it has been difficult to keep new staffers from quitting because of the actions of some disgruntled employees.

“We had another former staffer that would leak the names of the new employees we were hiring so that negative stories could be written about them,” she told the Daily Mail. 

“We even had interns quit because old staff threatened the interns, threatened that they would never get a job on the hill if they worked in my office.”

Nancy Mace

Mace further alleged that a former staffer hacked her devices and was able to track the whereabouts of her and her two children for months. 

“Literally, they could see where I was at all times. They could see my kids’ calendars, my doctors’ appointments, my medical information,” the South Carolina Republican said.  

“The stories I have from some of my former staff are horrific, and were a massive invasion of my privacy.

“We’re finding thousands of dollars in bills they didn’t pay …  paperwork that didn’t get filed that was supposed to,” she claimed, telling the outlet that she was furious when she found out that former staffers had left nearly $1 million in budgeted money for her office unspent.

“That money could have also gone toward salaries, bonuses – especially if you’re entry-level, it’s really hard to get by in DC,” she argued. “It was really outrageous.”

Money left unspent by congressional offices is remitted back to the US Treasury Department. 

Two former staffers denied several of Mace’s claims, telling the Daily Mail that the congresswoman failed to approve hundreds of thousands of dollars in office spending and that the personal calendars of members of Congress are routinely shared with staff. 

“No one hacked her accounts. She set them all up,” one of them said. 

“This seems to be stemming from paranoia and trust issues,” another ex-employee shot back.

“She’s clearly unwell and I hope she gets help.” 

The former staffer added that the allegation that a device was submerged in water was simply a case of water spilling onto a computer. 

As for the congresswoman’s claim that aides signed her name on documents without permission, the ex-staffer said Mace directed her team to use a signature stamp “for clerical tasks that she didn’t want to be bothered with.”

Mace, the first Republican woman elected to the House of Representatives from South Carolina, has served in Congress since 2021 and is up for re-election in November.

Share this article:

IMAGES

  1. Congressional Gifts and Travel, Legislative Proposals for the 109th

    congressional travel report

  2. 2022 Congressional Arts Report Card

    congressional travel report

  3. Congressional Travel over Time, Selected Congresses. Data compiled from

    congressional travel report

  4. Congressional Travel

    congressional travel report

  5. Data App: TX Congressional Travel

    congressional travel report

  6. TX Congressional Travel on Special Interests' Dime

    congressional travel report

COMMENTS

  1. Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives

    Members, officers, and staff of the U.S. House of Representatives are required by certain House Rules and federal statutes to file official documents on travel, income, gifts, etc. and to make this information available to the public as Public Disclosure documents. These documents are filed with the Clerk of the House and are available from the Legislative Resource Center, B81 Cannon House ...

  2. Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives

    Public disclosure documents filed with the Clerk are available from: Legislative Resource Center. B81 Cannon House Office Building. Washington, DC 20515-6612. (202) 226-5200. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm.

  3. Privately Funded Travel by Members of the House of Representatives

    The Clerk of the House publishes periodic reports of travel sponsored by non-governmental sources. Records covering travel by members of the House of Representatives and their staff are available since 2008. ... Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies: Original: April 21, 2024 - April 24, 2024: Jay Kronzer: Mark Green: R: TN ...

  4. Congressional travel derided as junkets back on the rise

    Congressional travel expenses spiked in 2016 to more than $19 million when new intelligence committees helmed by Republicans sought to get out into the field. The year before, Rep. Devin Nunes, R ...

  5. PDF Openthebooks Oversight Report Congressional Third Party Paid Travel

    Our Report Made Possible By: "I know that restoring transparency is not only the surest way to achieve results, but also to earn back the trust in government…" U.S. Sen. Barack Obama CONGRESSIONAL THIRD PARTY PAID TRAVEL Thousands Of Paid-For Congressional Trips, Millions Of Dollars In Federal Grants, And Hundreds Of

  6. About LegiStorm

    About LegiStorm's Congressional Travel Database. Trips FAQ. LegiStorm's congressional travel database provides details on 55,204 privately financed trips costing $141.5 million taken by members of Congress and their staff since the beginning of 2000. This information was obtained from the disclosure forms members of Congress and their staff are ...

  7. Congressional Reports

    You can locate Congressional Reports by: Using the Basic Search for keyword and metadata fielded searches,; Using the Advanced Search; fields specific to the CRPT will display after you select Congressional Reports in the Refine by Collection column,; Using the Citation Search to retrieve a single document in PDF format if you know the Congress number, report type and number, and doucment heading,

  8. PDF Congressional Record—House H231

    Reports concerning the foreign currencies and U.S. dollars utilized for Official Foreign Travel during the third and fourth quarters of 2022, pursuant to Public Law 95-384, are as follows: REPORT OF EXPENDITURES FOR OFFICIAL FOREIGN TRAVEL, COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, EXPENDED BETWEEN OCT. 1 AND DEC. 31, 2022

  9. PDF S6802 Congressional Record—Senate

    s6802 congressional record—senatenovember 17, 2022 consolidated report of expenditure of funds for foreign travel by members and employees of the u.s. senate, under authority of sec. 22, p.l. 95-384—22 u.s.c. 1754(b), committee on intelligence for travel from july 1 to sept. 30, 2022.—continued name and country name of currency

  10. Disclosure of International Travel by Congress

    In the 114th Congress, one measure related to disclosure of international travel by Congress has been introduced. H.R. 147, the Congressional Foreign Travel Cost Disclosure Act, was introduced January 6, 2015, by Representative Walter B. Jones, Jr., of North Carolina. The measure would require DOD to determine and disclose its transportation ...

  11. CRS Reports

    CRS serves as nonpartisan shared staff to congressional committees and Members of Congress. It operates solely at the behest of and under the direction of Congress. Information in a CRS Report should not be relied upon for purposes other than public understanding of information that has been provided by CRS to Members of Congress in connection ...

  12. Congressional Salaries and Allowances: In Brief

    Second, the report provides information on allowances available to Representatives and Senators to support them in their official and representational duties. These allowances cover official office expenses, including staff, mail, travel between a Member's district or state and Washington, DC, equipment, and other goods and services. Although

  13. LegiStorm Congressional Travel Database FAQ

    Since Republicans chaired committees for the vast majority of the timespan covered by the LegiStorm travel database (Jan. 1, 2000 - present), you will more frequently find cases where Democrat staffers have travel approved by Republican members of Congress. However, some staffers have simply changed party affiliation.

  14. Travel

    House Members and employees often receive invitations to travel, both in their official and personal capacities. Except as the House gift rule (House Rule 25, clause 5) otherwise provides, such travel expenses are a gift to the Member, officer, or employee. Like any other gift, travel expenses are subject to the basic gift prohibitions - including the prohibition against soliciting a gift ...

  15. Travel

    For more information about accepting travel that is unrelated to your official duties, see Gifts. ... To ensure your MECEA trip has been approved, contact the State Department's Congressional Liaison prior to traveling. If you are required to file Financial Disclosure Reports, you must report MECEA travel on Part 6 (Travel) of your Financial ...

  16. Congressional Travel Rules

    The trip is necessary to participate in a one day (travel time excluded) meeting or speaking engagement, fact-finding trip or similar. A second night's stay may be permitted if it is necessary to accomplish the purpose of the trip. A 501 (c) (3) charity, even if it hires a lobbyist, is exempt from the one-day trip.

  17. Reports

    The Thirty-Fifth Report of the Congressional Oversight Commission March 31, 2023 Read More » « Previous Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Next ...

  18. Congressional Liaison

    External links to other Internet sites and listings of private entities on this page are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as the U.S. Department of State or U.S. government endorsement of the entity, its views, the products or services it provides, or the accuracy of information contained therein.

  19. Taxpayers fund a first-class congressional foreign travel boom

    The pricey flights were part of a surge in foreign travel. Congress spent at least $14.7 million on taxpayer-funded trips in fiscal year 2016, a 27% increase over the year before, according to ...

  20. House Committee Reports

    REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES of the COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES for the ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEENTH CONGRESS FIRST SESSION JANUARY 3, 2021-JANUARY 3, 2022 SECOND SESSION JANUARY 3, 2022-DECEMBER 18, 2022 together with DISSENTING VIEWS. H. Rept. 117-703. COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES A N N U A L.

  21. Travel and Tourism in the U.S.: Prospects and Problems. Congressional

    Congressional Travel and Tourism Caucus, U.S. House of Representatives, H2-246, Washington, D.C. 20515. 1980. 72p. Journal of Travel Research 1982 20: 3, 39-39 Download Citation. If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Simply select your manager software from ...

  22. CBP Trade and Travel Fiscal Year 2022 Report

    CBP is committed to publishing the results of its key trade and travel programs and operations. This report summarizes CBP's Fiscal Year 2022 trade and travel facilitation and enforcement efforts. Attachment. Attachment column arrow image representing sort order (up is ascending, down is descending, and up/down is unsorted.

  23. Travel

    Travel.state.gov is the official website for U.S. citizens who want to travel abroad. Find information on visas, passports, health, safety, and more.

  24. Biden admin acknowledges possible Israeli weapons misuse in report

    The State Department missed an original deadline of Wednesday to submit the report to Congress. Biden had pledged to provide an initial report by May 8 on U.S. weapons transfers in a national ...

  25. Senate Passes Bill to Reauthorize FAA and Improve Air Travel

    The Senate also passed a short-term extension of the current F.A.A. law to give the House time to clear the longer-term package early next week. By Kayla Guo Reporting from the Capitol The Senate ...

  26. Hill watchdog says GOP Rep. Nehls may have misused campaign funds ...

    The Office of Congressional Ethics, a nonpartisan Capitol Hill watchdog, said there is "probable cause" to believe GOP Rep. Troy Nehls of Texas misused campaign funds for personal use ...

  27. PDF Congressional Guidance for A National Maritime Strategy

    Congressional uidance or ational aritime trategy 1 AMERICA'S MARITIME SECTOR IS OF VITAL ECONOMIC AND NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Decades of neglect by the U.S. government and private industry has weakened our shipbuilding capacity and maritime workforce, contributing to a declining U.S.-flag shipping fleet to bring American goods to

  28. Congressmen demand answers after CNN report contradicts Pentagon

    Nine Republican members of Congress have written to US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin urging him to explain discrepancies between CNN reporting last month about the ISIS-K attack that led to ...

  29. Rep. Nancy Mace accuses former staffers of 'sabotaging' her: report

    00:00. 00:57. Rep. Nancy Mace (R-SC) lashed out at her former staffers Friday, accusing them of hacking her phone, mismanaging funds and destroying electronic devices as part of an effort to ...

  30. Blinken report expected to criticize Israel, but say it isn't breaking

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken is expected to submit to Congress as soon as Friday a highly critical report about Israel's conduct in Gaza that stops short of concluding it has violated the terms for its use of U.S. weapons, three U.S. officials said.. Why it matters: The report assessing whether Israel complied with international law and restricted humanitarian aid to Gaza sparked the most ...