Gymnastics Zone

Gymnastics innovation.

advert

Definition: Tour Jeté

Tour Jeté : A ballet and gymnastics type of leap 1/2 twisting switch split action of the legs taking off one foot and landing on the other the other. It is, in essence, a jeté, which is a leap from one foot to the other, made with a kicking movement of the leg, done with a half turn.

A Ballet Student Doing a Series of Tour Jetés

Tour Jeté by Male Dancer

Click to Share:

Tags: Ballet , Gymnastics Dance

No comments yet.

Leave a reply.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

Popular Topics

  • Ask The Gymnastics Coach
  • Gymnastic Summer Camps
  • Gymnastics Strength Training
  • Gymnastics Terms
  • Team Parents
  • Gym Management
  • Gymnastics Safety

Wingate Tri-Meet

Wingate tri-meet - acrobatics & tumbling, coker vs wingate, lander vs mars hill, technique tuesday: progressions for tour jete 1/2.

null

Unlock this video, live events, and more with a subscription!

Already a subscriber? Log In

This week's gymnastics technique video features Kathryn Geddert, coach of World Champion and Olympic Gold medalist Jordyn Wieber from Twistars Gymnastics. Kathryn shares drill progressions she uses to help her gymnasts master the Tour Jete1/2 or Strug on beam and floor. Kathryn talks about each stage of the progression and what should be focused on during each stage.

  • Kathryn Geddert

Gymnastics Terms Glossary

Adolph : A front somersault with 3½ twists. Aerial : A cartwheel (side aerial) or front walkover (front aerial) where the hands do not come in contact with the floor. Amplitude : The amount of lift, repulsion, or extension of a particular skill. Apparatus : A piece of equipment used in gymnastics training or competition. Arabesque : A pose on one leg with the other leg extended behind the body. Arch position : A curvature of the body in a reverse direction. Assemble' : A simple dance maneuver where the legs are brought together in the air to a landing with legs still together. Attitude : The mental frame of reference displayed by a gymnast.

Back handspring : A move where a gymnast takes off from one or two feet, jumps backward onto the hands and pikes down to land on the feet; also known as a “flic-flac” or “flip-flop”. Back : A backward somersault. Back-in, full-out : Two continuous backwards somersaults with a full twist performed during the second somersault. Balance beam : A sixteen-foot beam, 4-inches wide and approximately 4-feet above the floor, used for routines involving leaps, turns and tumbling moves in women’s artistic gymnastics. Balance' : A connection of three dance steps with a demi-plie' on the first step and releve' on the last two steps. Balance : A static position like a scale or handstand position. Barani : Similar to a forward somersault with a half-twist, only the twist occurs early in the somersault. Basic Stand : A stand with the legs together and extended, torso erect, head neutral. Beatboard / Reuter Board : The vault board used in the men’s and women’s vault at the Olympic level. Bed: The area of a trampoline on which competitors bounce. Body wave : A wave-like movement of the entire body passing through the hips, shoulders, arms and head. Bridge : An arched position with the feet and hands flat on the floor and the abdomen up.

Cabriole' : A leap where one leg is raised to the front and the other leg is brought up swiftly underneath and beats against it before the gymnast lands on the foot used for take-off. Candlestick: A balance position high on the shoulders, with the hip angle open and body extended. Cartwheel : A sideways / lateral kick to handstand then step down sideways with arms and legs extended. Cast : From a front support (on uneven bars or horizontal bar), hands in overgrip, flexing at the hips (90 degrees) and immediately thrusting the legs backward and upward while maintaining the support position with extended arms. Cat leap : A leap where a gymnast takes off from one foot, raising one knee and then the other. Chaine' turn : A turn on the balls of the feet. Chasse ': A movement of the feet, either forwards or sideways which gives the impression of one foot chasing the other. (Often mispronounced as "Sa-shay.") Clear Stride Support : On Uneven Bars - one leg on each side of bar (one leg forward, one leg backward). Hands support the body so that it remains off of the bar. Clear : Movements in which only the hands (not the body) are in contact with the apparatus. Composition : The structure of a gymnastics routine. Compulsories : Pre-designed routines that contain specific movements required of all gymnasts. Contraction : Forward, then retract the abdominal wall backward. Counterswing: A backward swing on the bars. Coupe' : A term describing the position of the leg. The leg is bent with the toe pointed on or behind the ankle, depending on the position of the support leg (parallel or turned out). Cross : A position on the men's rings where the arms are straight out sideways, supporting the body, which is held vertically.

Demi-plie' : Position of the legs and feet used in preparation for jumps and turns and in landings. The knees are slightly flexed and turned out along with the feet. Develope' : The unfolding of a leg into an open position in the air. Diagonal tumbling : Male and female gymnasts commonly place their difficult tumbling skills on the diagonal, which is tumbling from corner to corner across the middle of the floor rather than tumbling from corner to corner on the sides of the floor area. Difficulty : A rating that measures the difficulty of specific moves and is factored into the total score after judges have scored the execution of the moves. Dismount : The final skill performed in a routine that must be stuck on landing, that is to take no steps on completion and then salute to the judges. Double stag ring leap : Similar to the double stag leap, but with the back arched so that the foot of the back leg is at or above head height. Double stag : A split leap where both legs are bent in the front and the back.

Element : A single skill or dance movement that has been assigned a degree of difficulty and or value in a gymnastics routine. Execution : The form, style, amplitude, timing and technique used to complete the skills included in a routine in their appropriate sequence.

Flank : A skill in which the body passes over a piece of equipment with the side of the body facing the apparatus. Flexibility : Flexibility is the range of motion through which a body part, such as the shoulders or legs, can move without feeling pain, while maintaining strength and stability of the joint. Flic-flac / Flip-flop : A move where a gymnast takes off from one or two feet, jumps backward onto the hands and lands on the feet; also known as a “flip-flop” or “back handspring”. Floor exercise : An event in men’s and women’s artistic gymnastics where a gymnast performs a series of exercises on an open 42' by 42' square of mats (with springs underneath) covered with carpet. Flyaway : An Uneven Bar dismount performed from a long swing to finish with a salto. Fouette : Push off one leg while kicking the other leg forward and upward executing a 180 degree turn, and land on the take-off leg. The other leg remains extended rearward. Front Support : Any support position where the arms are straight and extended in front of the body. Full-in, back-out : A double back ward’s somersault with a full twist performed during the first somersault.

Giant : A swing through 360 degrees around the bar, with the body fully extended. Glide : A forward swing on the low bar that finishes with the body extended. Grand jete : A scissor-like movement from one leg to the other with legs outstretched in the air. Grand plie : A position where the gymnast stands with legs fully bent. Half-in, half-out: A double somersault with a half-twist on each somersault.

Handspring : (Front handspring) A common term for a gymnastics element where the gymnast kicks up to and through a handstand by punching out of the shoulders and driving the heels over to land in a stand. (Back handspring) From a stand the gymnast jumps backward to land in a handstand position from which he or she pikes down to a stand. Handstand : Hands are flat on the floor, shoulder width apart, and the body completely extended and straight, legs together. Headstand : Place the hands and forehead on the floor in a triangular shape (head in front of hands), and extend the hips and legs straight upward over the triangular base of support. High bar : A bar standing approximately 9' high used in men’s artistic gymnastics; also called the “horizontal bar”. Hitchkick : Push upward off one leg while swinging the other leg forward and upward, switching legs in the air, and landing on the other foot, in a demi-plie'. Hop : Take off one foot to land on the same foot. Hurdle : A long, low, and powerful skip step, which may be preceded by a run. The hurdle is a transition from a run or jump into a gymnastics skill.

Inverted : Any position in which the lower body is moved into a position above the upper body. Inward turn : A turn in the direction of the supporting leg or arm; also known as a “reverse turn”. Jete' : A graceful move where a gymnast springs from one foot to the other. Jump : Moving from both feet to both feet.

Kip : A move from a hanging position below an apparatus to a support position above it, usually completed from a glide swing.

Landing Mat : A four to eight-inch mat filled with foam and ethyfoam to soften the landing when a gymnast dismounts the apparatus. Layout : A straight or slightly arched position of the body. Leap: Moving from one foot to the other foot showing flight. Leg circle : A standard pommel-horse move where a gymnast keeps the legs together and swings them in a full circle around the horse, with each hand lifted in turn from the pommel to let the legs pass. Lever : From a basic stand on one foot, the free leg is lifted behind with the arms stretched overhead, creating a straight line from the fingertips to toes. The hip joint acts as a fulcrum about which the arms and legs pivot as a unit. Lever positions should be seen when moving into or out of handstand skills. Lunge : A lunge is a position in which one leg is flexed approximately 90 degrees, and the other leg is straight and extended. The body is stretched and upright over the flexed leg.

Mixed grip : One hand in overgrip and the other in undergrip. Mount : The initial skill of a gymnastics routine.

Opposition : A position of the arms whereby one arm is placed in a forward-middle position and the opposite arm in side-middle. Optionals : Routines created by the gymnast which portray their best skills and personality. Overgrip : Grasping the bar with the thumbs pointing towards each other.

Panel Mats : Basic mats which are constructed of a single layer of resilient foam, ranging in thickness from one to two inches, that can be folded into panels approximately two feet wide. Parallel bars: An apparatus consisting of two wood-laminated fiberglass rails on uprights, adjustable in height and used for swinging, vaulting and balancing exercises in men’s artistic gymnastics. Passe' : A position of the leg whereby one leg is bent with the toe pointed against the inside of the knee of the support leg. (May be performed with the knee pointed forward or sideward) Pike: A position where the body is bent forward at the hips to 90 degrees or more while the legs are kept straight, with the thighs close to the upper body. Pirouette : To turn on one foot around the body’s longitudinal axis, as defined by the spine, in dance elements. Also descriptive of a move when the body is in a handstand position and the hands are used to rotate the body around it's longitudinal axis. Pivot : A sharp 1/2 turn around a single point of support, like one hand or a turn on the ball of the foot. Plane : An imaginary surface where moves are performed, i.e., lateral, frontal, horizontal or diagonal. Plie' : A position with the knees bent and the back straight. Pommel horse : A men's event similar to the vault horse but with two wooden pommels about which circling movements of the legs are performed. Presentation : (present) - a movement of the arms whereby the arm(s) open from forward-middle to a side-middle position. Prone : Lying face down with the body straight.

Randy : A front somersault with 2½ twists. Rear Support : Any support position where the arms are straight and extended behind the body. Rear : A descriptive term indicating that the body passes over or around an apparatus with the back of the body leading or facing the apparatus. Rebound : A quick jump using very little flexion of the hips, knees, or ankles. Release : To leave the bar to perform a move before grasping it again. Releve' : A swift rise or lift onto the ball of the foot. Reverse turn : A turn in the direction of the supporting leg; also known as an “inward turn”. Rhythm : The speed or tempo at which a skill/dance step is performed. Ring leap : A leap where the legs are in a splits position, with the front leg straight and the back leg bent, while the back, head and arms are arched backward, forming a “ring” shape. Rings: Two parallel rings, suspended from a cable and straps and held, one in each hand, for a series of exercises in men’s artistic gymnastics particularly requiring stillness of the body; also called the “still rings”. Round-off : A round-off is a dynamic turning movement. Step forward and push off one leg while swinging the legs upward in a fast cartwheel type motion. As the body becomes inverted, execute a 90-degree turn, push off the hand, the legs are brought together just before landing facing the direction from which the performer started. Routine : A combination of gymnastic, acrobatic, and dance elements displaying a full range of skills on one apparatus. Rudy : A front somersault with 1½ twists.

Scale : A balance on one leg, with the other leg raised backward, sideward or forward and the upper body lowered slightly. Scissor kick : A jump from one foot to the other with legs straightened as they swing forward, simulating the motion of scissors. Scissors : A standard pommel-horse skill where the legs straddle the horse as they swing around it and the hands are lifted in turn to let the leg pass. Sequence : Two or more positions or skills, which are performed together creating a different skill or activity. Side splits : A position where a gymnast sits on the floor with the legs at full horizontal extension on opposite sides of the body, forming a 180-degree split. Sissone : Stepping forward on one foot, bringing the other foot forward to a position behind the first, jump and separate the legs to a split position, and land on the first leg. Skill : A specific move that competitors are required to perform. SLP : Safety Landing Position. When landing from a gymnastics skill the athlete lands with knees bent, lower back rounded, and arms up next to the ears. Snap : A very quick movement of the body, usually form a 3/4 handstand position, moving the feet to the ground bringing the body to a near upright position. Somersault : A flip or rollover in the air where a gymnast rotates around the axis of the hips. Split leap : A forward leap from one foot, landing on the opposite foot and assuming a split position in mid-air. Splits : A position where one leg is extended forward and the other backward, at right angles to the body. Spot : To spot is to physically guide and/or assist a gymnast while performing a skill. Coaches spot for safety and when they are teaching new skills. Spotters : Usually the coach or an individual whose job it is to protect competitors from injury should they fall. Springboard / Vault Board : The device used to launch a gymnast into the air over a vault horse. Usually has 3 to 6 springs mounted between two boards, the top board being covered with carpet. Squared hips : A position of the body whereby both hips are flat and facing forward. Squat : Support on the balls of the feet with the knees and hips flexed so that the seat is near, but not touching the floor with the heels and torso erect. Stag leap : A leap where the front leg is bent at the knee and the other leg extends straight back behind the body. Stick : A gymnast "sticks" a landing when he/she executes a landing with correct technique and no movement of the feet. Straddle : A position in which the legs are straight and extended sideward. Straight Stand : Standing with the heels together at a position of attention. Stretch Position : Standing straight with the arms extended above your head. Stride support : A position on the bars whereby the weight is balanced on the hands with one leg on each side of the bar.(one leg forward, one leg backward) Supine (Layout Position): Lying flat on the back with the body straight, arms extended above the head.

Tkatchev : Named after Russian gymnast Alexander Tkatchev, a move from a backward giant to a backward straddle release over the bar. Tour jete' : Push off one leg while kicking the other leg forward and upward executing a 180 degree turn, switch the legs in the air, and land on the first leg. The take-off leg is extended rearward. Tripod : Place the hands and forehead on the floor in a triangular shape (head in front of hands), and extend the hips above the triangular base. The body is piked with the knees bent, resting on the elbows. Tuck : A position where the knees and hips are bent and drawn into the chest. Turn : A rotation on the body’s axis supported by one or both feet. Twist : A move in acrobatic skills where a gymnast rotates around the body’s longitudinal axis, defined by the spine.

Undergrip : Grasping the bar with both thumbs facing out, away from each other. Uneven bars : An apparatus in women’s artistic gymnastics with a top bar almost 10 feet above the floor and a lower bar 4 1/2' high, used for a continuous series of grip changes, releases, new grasps and other complex moves.

Vault : A solid apparatus similar to the pommel horse, but lacking handles, and used in men’s and women’s artistic gymnastics for a variety of handsprings from a running approach. V-sit : A position where the legs are raised off the floor close together and the body is supported by the hands to form a “V” shape.

Walkover : A gymnast kicks up from a standing position through a handstand position to a standing position while “walking” through the air with the feet. Waltz Step : Three consecutive steps, demi-plie' through 4th position on the first step and releve' on the next two steps. Wedge : A developmental mat filled with soft, shock absorbent foam. Its distinct shape is a sloping triangle with various heights and widths.

Yurchenko vault : Named after Soviet gymnast Natalia Yurchenko, a vault that begins with a round-off entry onto the vault board and continues with a back handspring onto the horse and a back 1½ somersault off.

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Gymnastics Coaching.com

tumbling, tramp, diving, acrobatics, circus, cheer, dance, martial arts, X sports … and more

BGtv – developing tour jete

W ith coach Tracey Skirton .

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube .

Share this:

Published by.

' src=

Career gymnastics coach who loves the outdoors, and the internet. View all posts by Rick Mc

Leave a comment Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Making Sense of Composition – Level 10 Floor

This article has been updated to reflect the changes in the 2022-2026 DP Code of Points.

Have you ever watched a floor routine that looked amazing, but then it scored low? I know I have! Especially before I started judging, it just didn’t make sense! What was the problem? Composition deductions! 

But what exactly does that mean? We’ll take a closer look today. 

This is the third article in a three-part series. In case you missed the first two articles, you can read here about Level 8 and Level 9 composition deductions.

This series discusses composition deductions on floor for levels 8, 9, and 10. In 2018, USAG made changes to their compositional deductions, in order to make the “up to the level” deductions more specific. There are three categories of “Up to the Level” deductions: Acro, Dance, and Dismount. In this article, I will discuss these deductions in detail as they relate to Level 10 floor.

Value Parts in a Level 10 Floor Routine

When a coach and gymnast are constructing a routine, they will first want to consider the skills, or Value Parts, that are allowable for the gymnast’s level. For those who are unfamiliar, skills in the J.O. Program are valued from A to E, with A skills being the easiest, and E skills being the most difficult. Level 10 gymnasts are allowed to perform any elements, A through E, for both acro and dance skills. Level 10’s will want to fulfill their Special Requirements and compositional requirements using skills that showcase the gymnast’s strengths, meet the difficulty level to the best of the gymnast’s ability, and that minimize deductions.

gymnast tumbling on floor composition

Acro Composition Deductions in a Level 10 Floor Routine

The composition deductions for acro level are split into two categories: 3-pass routines and 2-pass routines. The deductions are different in the two categories, with more strict rules for 2-pass routines. If a gymnast does a 3-pass routine, and has a D in all three passes, or 2 D’s and a B+C bonus combination, she will receive no deduction. If she has no D saltos in any of her passes, she will get the maximum 0.20 deduction. For a 2-pass routine, she must perform E saltos in both passes, or an E and D+A direct connection, for no deduction. If she has no D/E saltos, or one D and a C+A or less difficult 2nd pass, she will receive the maximum 0.20 deduction. Here are some examples:

3-pass Routine

  • Double pike (D) 2 1/2 twist, punch front (D+A +.20) Rudi (D) NO deduction
  • Full-in (E) Double back (D) 1 1/2 twist, front layout (C+B +.20) NO deduction
  • Arabian double front (E) Front double full (E) Front full, front tuck (C+A +0.10) 0.05 deduction
  • Double back (D) Rudi (D) Front tuck through to double full (A+C, no bonus) 0.10 deduction
  • Double pike (D) 1 1/2 twist, front layout (C+B +0.20) Front-full, front tuck (C+A +0.10) 0.10 deduction
  • Rudi (D) Front layout, front-full (B+C +0.20) Double full (C) 0.15 deduction
  • Double back (D) 1 1/2 twist, front tuck (C+A +0.10) Front pike through to front-full (B+C indirect, no bonus) 0.15 deduction
  • 1 1/2 twist, front layout (C+B +0.20) Double full (C) Front-full (C) 0.20 deduction

2 pass routine

  • Double layout (E) Front double full, front tuck (E+A) NO deduction
  • Double front (E) 2 1/2 twist, front tuck (D+A) NO deduction
  • Front tuck through to double back (A+D indirect, +0.10) Rudi, layout stepout (D+A direct, +0.20) 0.05 deduction
  • Front double full (E) Whip through to double pike (A+D indirect, +0.10) 0.05 deduction
  • Whip, 2 1/2 twist (A+D direct, +0.10) Rudi (D) 0.10 deduction
  • Full-in (E) Front-full, front tuck (C+A direct, +0.10) 0.10 deduction
  • Double layout (E) Front-full, front pike (C+B +0.20) 0.10 deduction
  • Front double full (E) 1 1/2 twist, front-full (C+C +0.20) 0.10 deduction
  • Double back (D) Front-full, front layout (C+B +0.20) 0.15 deduction
  • Rudi, layout stepout (D+A, +0.20) Double full (C) 0.15 deduction
  • Full-in (E) Front layout, front pike (B+B) 0.15 deduction
  • Double pike (D) Front tuck through to 1 1/2 twist (A+C indirect, no CV) 0.20 deduction
  • Front-full, front layout (C+B) 1 1/2 twist, front pike (C+B) 0.20 deduction

Gymnast doing double stag ring leap on Level 10 floor

Dance Composition Deductions

To receive no deduction for dance composition, the gymnast must perform 3 C elements OR 2 D/E elements, either in combination or isolated. She will receive the maximum deduction if she performs only 1 C element, or 2 B elements.

  • Switch-side, Popa (C+C) Double turn (C) NO deduction
  • Cat leap, switch-full (A+D) Tuck jump double (D) NO deduction
  • Switch-ring, switch-1/2 (C+C) 1 1/2 turn (B) 0.05 deduction
  • Tour jete 1/2, tuck jump (C+A) Ring jump 1/1 (D) 0.05 deduction
  • Split jump full, wolf jump full (C+C) 0.10 deduction
  • Switch leap, sissone (B+A) Triple turn (D) 0.10 deduction
  • Cat leap 1 1/2 (C) Split leap, side leap (A+B) 0.15 deduction
  • Split leap, cat leap 2/1 (A+D) 0.15 deduction
  • Double turn (C) Split leap, jump 1/1 (A+A) 0.20 deduction
  • Switch leap, straddle jump (B+B) 0.20 deduction

Gymnast pose after dismount Level 10 floor

Dismount Composition Deductions

To receive no deduction for dismount composition on floor, the gymnast must perform a D/E salto, or a C+B direct connection of two saltos. She will receive the maximum deduction if she performs an indirect A+C connection, or an isolated C salto or less difficult.

  • D/E (Double back, Rudi, 2 1/2 twist, etc) NO deduction
  • Front-full, front pike (C+B direct) NO deduction
  • Front pike stepout through to 1 1/2 twist (B+C indirect) 0.05 deduction
  • 1 1/2 twist, front tuck (C+A direct) 0.05 deduction
  • Front tuck stepout through to double full (A+C indirect) 0.10 deduction
  • Isolated front-full (C) or less difficult 0.10 deduction

The one gray area with Level 10 dismount deductions is a B+B direct tumbling pass. This pass still receives bonus, so it could be considered a 0.05 deduction, similar to the C+A direct connection. However, neither skill is a minimum C value, so the full 0.10 deduction could also be considered.

Other Composition Deductions

  • Lack of minimum “B” turn: 0.2. If the gymnast attempts a B turn but it is more than 90 degrees incomplete, or if she does not attempt one at all, she will receive this deduction. It doesn’t come off the start value, but instead is taken at the end of the routine.
  • Lack of minimum of C salto: 0.3.
  • Failure to perform saltos or aerials in two different directions: 0.1. The gymnast must perform a backward salto/aerial, and a forward or sideward salto/aerial. An Arabian salto is considered a forward salto. Aerial cartwheels or walkovers will fulfill this compositional requirement, even though they do not fulfill the salto Special Requirement.
  • Overuse of dance elements with same shape: 0.1. This deduction would be taken only for more than two straddle jumps (with/without turn), or more than two elements with a wolf or tuck position (with/without turn).
  • Insufficient use of floor exercise area: up to 0.1. This deduction could be applied if the gymnast stays in the same section of the floor mat for most of her routine.

As you can see, there are many different components of composition deductions for Level 10 floor. If you’re meeting all of these categories and are still unsure of the deductions, general deductions and specific execution are the next place to look. Put it all together and the result will be fantastic!

I love watching Level 10 floor because of the exciting skills and combinations you will see! Are there any of your favorites that I didn’t mention here?

Further Reading

The Ideal Composition for a Level 10 Bar Routine

Making Sense of Composition: Level 10 Beam

Making Sense of Composition: Level 8 Floor

Making Sense of Composition: Level 9 Floor

How to Demonstrate Artistry in Gymnastics

USA Gymnastics Development Program Code of Points, 2022-2026.

  • To save this word, you'll need to log in. Log In

Definition of tour jeté

called also jeté en tournant

Word History

French, literally, thrown turn

Love words?

You must — there are over 200,000 words in our free online dictionary, but you are looking for one that’s only in the Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary.

Start your free trial today and get unlimited access to America's largest dictionary, with:

  • More than 250,000 words that aren't in our free dictionary
  • Expanded definitions, etymologies, and usage notes
  • Advanced search features

Dictionary Entries Near tour jeté

Cite this entry.

“Tour jeté.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tour%20jet%C3%A9. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!

Play Quordle: Guess all four words in a limited number of tries.  Each of your guesses must be a real 5-letter word.

Can you solve 4 words at once?

Word of the day.

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Popular in Grammar & Usage

8 grammar terms you used to know, but forgot, homophones, homographs, and homonyms, your vs. you're: how to use them correctly, every letter is silent, sometimes: a-z list of examples, more commonly mispronounced words, popular in wordplay, the words of the week - mar. 1, 'blue moon,' 'wolf moon,' and other moons to look for throughout the year, 10 scrabble words without any vowels, 12 more bird names that sound like insults (and sometimes are), 8 uncommon words related to love, games & quizzes.

Play Blossom: Solve today's spelling word game by finding as many words as you can using just 7 letters. Longer words score more points.

  • Search forums
  • Featured Threads

Follow along with the video below to see how to install our site as a web app on your home screen.

Note: This feature may not be available in some browsers.

WAG   Leaps and jumps turning direction

  • Thread starter Learning Parent GB
  • Start date Jan 31, 2019
  • Tags jump leap
  • ChalkBucket Forums
  • Women's Artistic Gymnastics (WAG)

DON'T LURK... Join The Discussion!

Members see fewer ads.

Learning Parent GB

Learning Parent GB

  • Jan 31, 2019

I've been trying to picture various leaps and jumps with turns and read an old thread on here and got myself thoroughly confused. I'm imagining a gymnast with a best left leg split, just because that is what my DD has, but this isn't about her gymnastics but me getting my head around it without asking her. Split jump half: Jump half turn to the left then split then land Split jump full: Half turn to the left, split, half turn to the left OR Half turn to the right, split, half turn to the right Tour jete: Left leg forward, half turn to the right as left leg swings forward again. Is this a full tour jete? If you do a further half turn on the way down to end up facing the way you were going to start with, is that a tour jete with half turn? Or do you need to do that bit anyway? Changeleg half: Left leg forward then as it swings back you do the half turn to your left to end up in your preferred front leg split. Changeleg full: As above, but then a half turn to your left as you come down to make it a full turn. Feel free to laugh away. When I watch a routine I get confused between a tour jete and a split leap with a turn. Yet as I have written it down they each turn in opposite directions. IF you can point me in the direction of a slow mo video or nice diagram then I will love you forever!  

I can't help. But wanted to tell you that I can't tell the difference either. My daughter just tells me which one she does. So you aren't alone.  

Carabistouille

Yeah, everything you have written is correct. About the split jump full, I have seen it done both ways. I prefer to do "turn left, split left, turn left" but some people prefer to do it "turn right, split left, turn right". It makes the last half turn easier. A tour jeté is only the half turn version (Left leg forward, half turn to the right as left leg swings forward again). If you add a half turn, it's a tour jeté half, if you add a full turn, a tour jeté full. A split leap full is the same as a tour jeté half. You got the switch half/full correct. If you want to practice, you might find this video useful : Unfortunately it's in French, but you only need to know that "saut changement tour" means "switch full" and that "saut grand jeté tour" means "tour jeté half"/"split leap full".  

Thank you. I'm sure getting stuff right was only by accident! I watched back last year's videos of my DD to try and work it out. I think she does a tour jete half in her leap series, and then a split jump full but it turns in the opposite direction. But as that is a jump and the tour jete half is a leap, then it must feel different to her. That's partly why I didn't want to ask her - I don't want her to overthink it trying to explain it to me. When she relaxes and doesn't overthink things then everything is better.  

Even watching the video I keep thinking I've got it then getting it wrong. You can tell I'm not a gymnast. But I will keep trying. (To understand, not to be a gymnast!)  

Zivaah

A nice way to distinguish switch with turn and the tour jete technique is looking at the direction of the leap. Switch leaps with turn always travel a long distance whereas tour jete is going more into the height! For the split jump with turn, I teach it this way: turn right, split left, turn right. It indeed makes the last turn way easier. But both ways are possible.  

Learning Parent GB said: I think she does a tour jete half in her leap series, and then a split jump full but it turns in the opposite direction. But as that is a jump and the tour jete half is a leap, then it must feel different to her. Click to expand...
Carabistouille said: Yep, this is perfectly normal. If your good split if left, then your tour jeté half will turn to the right. Split jump can turn either way, but turning to the left is very common, especially if the gymnast twists left. If you want to practice the switch half/tour jeté yourself, try standing on your right foot (you can hold on to a wall or something), then swing your left leg forward, then, staying on your (right) foot : - swing your left leg backward while turning your body to the left (so your left leg ends up being in front of you) => this is a switch half - turn to the right (so your left leg is now behing you), then swing your left leg forward again => this is a tour jeté (without the jump and the split obviously, but you get the idea) Click to expand...

Aussie_coach

I usually teach kids to turn the opposite direction to their split. So turn left, split right, turn left but you have the occasional kid for whom it just works better the other way.  

wandrewsjr

Carabistouille said: Yeah, everything you have written is correct. About the split jump full, I have seen it done both ways. I prefer to do "turn left, split left, turn left" but some people prefer to do it "turn right, split left, turn right". It makes the last half turn easier. A tour jeté is only the half turn version (Left leg forward, half turn to the right as left leg swings forward again). If you add a half turn, it's a tour jeté half, if you add a full turn, a tour jeté full. A split leap full is the same as a tour jeté half. You got the switch half/full correct. If you want to practice, you might find this video useful : Unfortunately it's in French, but you only need to know that "saut changement tour" means "switch full" and that "saut grand jeté tour" means "tour jeté half"/"split leap full". Click to expand...

* And whether there is insufficient height of the swing leg or insufficient split after leg change.  

wandrewsjr said: This is a great video! I have to review the switch full vs tour jete half thing all the time. Now add in having to watch the feet to see if they are cheating the entry or not getting completely around at finish to decide whether they get credit for a full rotation. And whether the lead leg is bent and never extends and shouldn't get switch credit. I find these upper level dance skills the hardest to evaluate. Click to expand...
Learning Parent GB said: So for a switch leap it has to go forward 45 degrees before it swings back the other way. Is that right? What is the rule for a tour jete? One thing I do get is the angle that they land and wondering whether they would have been better going for a half rather than a full if they land three quarters of the way around. Click to expand...
  • Latest: Anonymous (d2e5)
  • Today at 1:04 PM
  • Latest: TumbleTimes4
  • Today at 12:11 PM

raenndrops

  • Latest: raenndrops
  • Today at 10:55 AM

Xcel or Development Program: Which Is The Right Path For Your Gymnast?

JBS

Questioning Coach - Preteam - How to address

What to add in a parent survey, let’s talk skills/strategies for recruiting.

littlegirlsdream

Nutrition for Gymnasts when training through evening meal times?

Gymnaverse :: recent activity, college gym news, similar threads.

  • Dec 15, 2023
  • Tyler Smith
  • Jan 19, 2024

GymnastMomX2

  • GymnastMomX2
  • Dec 6, 2023
  • GymnastPotterhead
  • Aug 21, 2023
  • platinum requirements

xcelerate

  • Feb 14, 2024

Splat

  • Latest: Carabistouille
  • Today at 8:01 AM

Jenny

  • Latest: Jenny
  • Today at 6:08 AM
  • Style chooser
  • Change width
  • Terms and rules
  • Privacy policy
  • Dance Magazine
  • Dance Spirit
  • Dance Teacher
  • The Dance Edit
  • Events Calendar
  • College Guide
  • Newsletters

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

7 Tips for a More Powerful Tour Jeté

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

It’s a staple of grand allégro, but tour jeté—also called grand jeté entournant or entrelacé—is not easy. Miami City Ballet School’s Geta Constantinescu shares how she helps her students fly higher.

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Prepare with care: “Let’s say you piqué arabesque on the right leg,” says Miami City Ballet School faculty member Geta Constantinescu. As you chassé sideways, “that right leg has to go in back, not in front of the left leg. Many don’t even notice that little mistake!” The left foot is then available as you turn to step forward onto it, going into the tour jeté.

Plié both legs generously as you brush the leg through first position , so you don’t jump from just one. “Use the floor to help elevate yourself.”

Be direct: Instead of brushing to grand battement devant, Constantinescu often sees dancers go through a rond de jambe or “something not very clear,” she says. “What is front, where is the toe going when you toss it in the air?” She suggests practicing the brush en avant in tendu and adagio combinations, to “imprint” that pathway.

Let the arms assist: Coordinate your port de bras with your grand battement. The arms go up through high fifth as you take off. They begin to open, Constantinescu says, “right at the top of the jump.”

Practice your takeoff and landing at the barre with this combination: Grand battement devant on demi-point, turning towards the barre as you close fifth to finish on the other side with the opposite leg in arabesque plié.

Think “forward”: As the legs switch, think of the arabesque in the air as a “demi-penché” to create space for a greater split. “Feel connected from the lower belly to the heart center as the leg goes back,” says Constantinescu. “That lifting of the sternum supports the line of the demi-penché.”

Imagine you’re “kicking a ball” with the front leg as the back leg scissors into arabesque, like in a big sissone ouvert. “This will incorporate that quality of split in the air.”

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Ask Amy: I’m Starting Pointe Soon. Does It Hurt?

A cute white piggy bank wearing a pink rhinestone tiara and tiny pink tutu rests on top of a pink table. Below its feet is a one dollar bill, and loose change is scattered off to its right side.

In Need of Financial Aid? Here Are Tips for Funding Your Summer Intensive

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Technique, Performance, and Networking Align in Next Generation Ballet’s New Summer Intensive Partnership

A young woman in a blue shirt smiles and poses with a reusable water bottle, her brown hair pulled into a bun.

Nutrition Advice for Your Best Summer Intensive Auditions

This CGM Knows…

The Ins and Outs of the Gymnastics World

Gymnastics – Elite Floor Exercise – FIG Scoring

  • Posted on August 18, 2016
  • Elite Gymnastics , FIG Scoring
  • No Comments

Elite Floor Routine at Olympics

We all know that the scoring in gymnastics is a bit confusing, but it isn’t as bad as NBC would have you think it is with their red, yellow and green marks which both simplify it beyond recognition, without really discussing what makes up a good or bad score and leaves out the difficulty score all together.  I also feel that NBC, by talking down to us , does a disservice to gymnastics fans, old and new.   Don’t even get me started on this comment

From International Gymnast: For those of you complaining (still) about NBC’s Olympic coverage, get ready for more of the same: “The people who watch the Olympics are not particularly sports fans. More women watch the games than men, and for the women, they’re less interested in the result and more interested in the journey. It’s sort of like the ultimate reality show and miniseries wrapped into one.” John Miller, NBC’s chief marketing officer.

Geez, really?  That comment Makes me a bit sick.  Will we ever get past the idea that women are mindless fluff bags.  Ugh.

Anyway for those of you that would like to understand what is being performed and the basics of how it is scored, I will be posting about each event one by one.  Let’s start with floor.

Floor Exercise

There are two parts to scoring a gymnastics routine.

Difficulty Score

This part of the score is a combination of three things…

Composition Requirements

Each routine must contain certain skills and requirements.  For floor at the elite level these requirements are…

  • A dance passage including two different leaps or hops.  The objective is to create a large flowing and traveling movement.
  • A salto (flip where hands DO NOT touch the floor) in two directions – Must do a salto backwards and then either forward or sideways
  • A Salto with a long angle turn of at least 360 degrees.  This means a twisting flip where the hands don’t touch the floor, such as a front 1 1/2 twist or a back double twist or a full twisting back tuck.
  • A Salto with a double flip – like a double back tuck, pike or layout
  • The last tumbling pass that a gymnast does must be of a D difficulty value to receive full credit, lower level skills will receive less points toward  – each skill is given a letter value for how difficult it is with A being the easiest and currently I being the most difficult

Each of these requirements is worth .5 points for a total of 2.5 points toward the difficulty score

Top 8 skills

Each skill is given a value based on it’s difficulty.  An A skill is worth .1 with a tenth added for each level of difficulty up through and I being worth .9

For floor, the top 8 skills are counted as part of the D-score with a maximum of 5 tumbling elements and a minimum of 3 dance elements counting.  This will mostly consist of C,D and E skills with the best in the world throwing in some really crazy even higher level skills

The adding of these skills will make up the difference between the top gymnasts and the rest.  I will lay out a couple of examples below.

Connection Bonus

If a gymnast completes two skills of a certain value connected to one another then they can receive and extra .1 or .2 added to their D-Score.

For floor exercise, this basically means a D or higher skill connected to an A or B skill or connecting of two C or higher skills.  Only skills without hand support count for connections.

You can also get a connection for connecting a dance element to an acro element and you will see many gymnasts leaping or jumping out at the end of their tumbling passes to get this connection bonus.

There is also a connection bonus for two directly connected turns.

I find this the most confusing part of the code so I have included a video in the resources section below from one of my favorite YouTube Channels.  Hopefully this will help clear it up a bit.

Add it all Together

So the D-Score is a total of the above three things all added together.

2.5 for Composition

Top 8 skills difficulty value

Difficulty Score (D-Score)

Execution Score

This is where deductions come for how well a gymnast executes the skill as well and things like artistry and performance.

The Execution score is more like the traditional 10.0.  The score starts from a 10 and points are taken off of that for every mistake a gymnast makes.

This includes things like bent legs, crossed legs, form breaks, steps on the landing and other technical deductions but it also includes things like expressiveness, confidence, quality of choreography, musicality and specific apparatus deductions.  For floor this can included standing in the corner for too long before a tumbling pass or improper distribution of elements, such as they can’t start their routine directly into a tumbling pass.  The difficulty of skills must also be distributed with dance elements of high difficulty as well as tumbling of high value.

As you can tell some of this is very subjective and the part that makes this a subjectively judged sport.

The execution score is added to the difficulty score to produce the final score.

Let’s take a look at a couple of examples

Simone biles – 2016 p&g championships (us national championships).

She scored 16.050 (6.9 D-Score + 9.150 Execution)

Full Twisting Double Layout – H Straddle jump with a full twist + stag jump – C+A Biles + sissone – G+A – .1 Connection Bonus Front Arial – A Double Wolf Turn – D Switch Leap + Tour Jete full – B+D Double Double – Double Back with 2 Twists – H Switch Full – D Full In Double Back Tuck – E

Composition – 2.5 + Top 8 Skills – Tumbling -HHGE  Dance – DDDC – 4.3 + Connection Bonus – .1 = 6.9 D-Value

As a contrast let’s take a look at another gymnast who is an amazing little up and coming firecracker from The host country of Brazil.  One of my favorite’s to watch.

Flavia Saraiva – Floor Exercise 2016 Rio Test Event

She scored a 14.65 (5.8 Difficulty + 8.85 Execution)

Back 1.5 twist + Front 2x Twist – C+D – .2 bonus Full Turn – A Full In Double Back – E Switch Ring + Tour Jete full – C+D Double Back Pike – D Switch leap with full turn – D Double Back Tuck – D

Composition – 2.5 + Top 8 Skills – Tumbling -EDDDC  Dance -DDC  – 3.1 + Connection Bonus – .2 = 5.8 D-Value

FIG Code of Points 2013-2016

Here is a great video that outlines what combonations of tumbling and dance can receive connection bonus.  Enjoy!

photo credit: radu09 women gymnastics olympics 2012 sandra izbasa 01 via photopin (license)

Wanna Share It?

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)

Related Post

2016 rio olympics – women’s gymnastics break down.

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Morgan Vs. Melanie – Floor Final – What’s the Deal?

Be part of the conversation cancel reply.

What it's like competing for the most remote team in NCAA gymnastics

  • D'Arcy Maine, ESPN.com

Copy Link

MARIE-SOPHIE BOGGASCH KNEW "absolutely nothing" about Alaska -- the state or the school -- before she arrived in Anchorage for her official recruiting visit in 2012.

She was a talented elite gymnast in Germany, finishing as high as 12th in the national championships in 2011. But she didn't become aware of NCAA gymnastics until February of what was the equivalent of her senior year of high school. She began the recruiting process soon after -- years later than most other potential college athletes. By then, most schools had used up all of their scholarships for the incoming academic year, and the University of Alaska at Anchorage was the only program to offer her a full scholarship spot.

It was 4,662 miles away from home -- and a minimum of three flights and about 21 hours of travel -- but Boggasch knew it was right for her from the moment she set foot on campus. She loved the coaching staff, the welcoming nature of everyone she encountered, the area's natural beauty and the school's aviation department.

Almost twelve years later, she is still there -- and is now the head coach.

The school and the team, she said, have given her everything, in and out of the gym. She met her husband there. It's allowed her to become a pilot with her own plane and foster her love for the outdoors. While she always imagined she would end up somewhere warm and near the beach, it's where her life is, and she loves everything about it.

But leading one of the NCAA's most remote college gymnastics team is not without a unique set of challenges. The University of Alaska at Anchorage is over 2,200 miles away from its nearest possible opponent, resulting in long travel days, budget constraints and scheduling headaches. This year, the Seawolves had just two meets at home, both held during its first weekend of the season, which resulted in "Senior Night" being held in January.

It makes for a drastically different experience than virtually every other program in the country, but Boggasch and her team -- which includes gymnasts from six countries and eight states -- wouldn't have it any other way. It's what they know and who they are.

"For us, all of this is just normal. I've never seen it any other way," Boggasch said last week. "This is a very special group and a very special team. I think the drive and determination is unparalleled. Many on the team have had to fight to make sure they, and we, had a home in this sport in the future. And that's made us such a tight-knit group.

"We try to go above and beyond just the gymnastics aspect and make sure we're creating good people. And every day we try to have the most fun -- and always have the most glitter."

MONTANA FAIRBAIRN, A junior from Alberta, Canada, couldn't wait to attend UAA. From the moment Boggasch picked her and her dad up from the airport during her recruiting visit in January of 2020, she knew it felt like home. She too loved the welcoming atmosphere -- from those on the team and everyone she encountered -- and the expansive mountain views everywhere she turned. Some extended family members were surprised at her decision to go so far away from home, but ultimately everyone was thrilled she had achieved her longtime goal of earning a full scholarship to a Division I program.

The world had changed in the months between her commitment to the school and when she arrived on campus in August of 2020. Due to the travel restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic, her parents weren't allowed to come with her to get her settled. Joined by fellow Canadian freshman teammate Emily Walker, the two teenagers made the multiple-flight trek alone. Within hours of getting to their dorm, both had received a Zoom invitation for a meeting that day.

Fairbairn still can't believe what happened next.

"Some girls were still on airplanes, and others at the airport waiting to board their flights, and Marie-Sophie came on the call and said, 'They're cutting our program,'" Fairbairn said. "My heart shattered. I'm like, 'Are you kidding me? I just got here.'"

On Aug. 19, 2020, the university announced it would be cutting the women's gymnastics team, in addition to the men's hockey team and the women and men's skiing teams at the conclusion of the 2020-2021 school year. As gymnastics and hockey are the only programs at the school that competed at the Division I level -- the other sports are all Division II - the announcement said the decision would save the school $2.5 million per year.

But no one was going to go down without a fight. Not Fairbairn or her teammates. Nor the hockey and ski teams. And most certainly not Boggasch. She had been promoted from assistant to the interim head coach just weeks earlier and she was not going to let the program that meant so much to her disappear on her watch.

"I don't think I ever really had a doubt in my mind that we were going to fight for it," Boggasch said. "Of course the emotions were high, the stakes were high, and calling the team and telling them was the hardest part. We had a transfer, whose former team had been cut [at Seattle Pacific University], and she was on the jetway for her flight to come here. I can't imagine what she was feeling.

"But very quickly we came up with plans of actions on how to make ourselves more potentially self-sustainable, and what we could do to prove that we're worth the investment. I think as gymnasts we have a competitive, fiery energy and we want to win. We looked at this as another challenge we were determined to beat."

The university initially didn't offer any pathways to save the programs. But that didn't stop Boggasch, assistant coach Kendra McPheters, and the gymnasts on the team from speaking out anywhere and everywhere they could, from town halls to state legislators' offices to Board of Regents meetings. Eventually, after about a month of a public advocacy campaign, which also included a flood of letters and emails from Seawolves supporters, they were told if they could raise $880,000 -- about two years of the program's operating budget -- the team could be reinstated.

They got to work.

The 2021 season was canceled due to the pandemic, and the team turned their efforts and energy into full-time fundraising. Boggasch started a spreadsheet of local businesses to which members of the team could reach out. The list grew to around 1,500 and the gymnasts divided and conquered. Fairbairn, who was just 17, had never had to seek out donations from strangers before.

"I think it showed recruits that this is a program really worth fighting for." Marie-Sophie Boggasch

"I don't even know how many businesses I called," Fairbairn said. "It felt like every business in Alaska was on that list, I'm not exaggerating. We would ask if they would donate any amount of money or if they could provide an item for a silent auction. I really had to get out of my comfort zone as a little freshman and talk. It was hard but it was so worth it."

Some businesses were able to make sizable donations, and many others gave what they could -- small financial contributions or other offerings. Of all the teams in jeopardy of being cut, Boggasch said gymnastics had the most donors.

In February of 2021, the school announced the team had raised enough to compete for one more year. While the gymnasts were relieved to have at least a final season to compete, they kept pushing. Finally, after almost two full years of non-stop fundraising and advocacy, and with donations coming in from 37 states and six countries, the gymnastics team was officially, and permanently, reinstated in June of 2022 . They had raised $880,000. The hockey and ski teams were also reinstated after reaching their respective goals.

Boggasch, who had lost the "interim" title in 2021, could now finally just focus on being a gymnastics coach. While recruiting for a program with an uncertain future might seem like an impossible task, Boggasch found the opposite to be true. Few gymnasts transferred and she had found an unprecedented number of athletes interested in the program.

"You would think it would be hard to convince someone to come when you're not sure if there will even be a team but because we had such a public fight, and did so much public advocacy, I think it showed recruits that this is a program really worth fighting for," Boggasch said. "It weirdly got our name out there. I wish the attention had come from something completely positive but it showed just how special this team is and that we were worth saving."

There were seven freshmen gymnasts for the 2023 season -- one of the biggest classes in team history. The roster included members from Hawaii, El Salvador and Australia.

THE COMMUNITY SUPPORT remains invaluable. With donor funds, the team was able to hire Hannah Hartung as a second assistant coach ahead of the 2024 season.

It has also allowed Boggasch to successfully argue to bring more of her gymnasts for road meets. Previously the team had a strict limit of 12 per trip -- which often would result in single-event specialists being left behind even if they were capable of high scores -- but now there is more flexibility and no set number. The full 20-gymnast roster doesn't all travel, but it has provided Boggasch a chance to bring "a healthy squad" capable of the highest possible team score.

The budget always remains top of mind, though.

Boggasch, who is in charge of making the team's competitive schedule and works closely with a travel agent, has tried to convince several programs to make the trip to Anchorage for a weekend. Because of the distance, Alaska schedules two meets per weekend -- typically on Friday night and Sunday afternoon -- and Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) rival UC Davis was the only school to make the journey this season. Another team was scheduled for a weekend in February but canceled shortly before the official schedule release. It was too late to find another opponent, hence "Senior Night" being at the very beginning of the season.

The rest of the season has been spent on the road. Their first trip of 2024 was over 3,000 miles away in January, with a Friday meet at Bridgeport and a Sunday meet at Brown.

That meant leaving campus on Wednesday afternoon -- several hours ahead of the team's initial schedule due to a late flight cancellation that morning -- then driving to the airport for the more-than three-hour flight to Seattle. Because they were in Seattle earlier than planned, they then stayed in an airport hotel for about five hours in hopes of getting some sleep. From there it was a five-hour flight to JFK in New York.

Upon arrival, the team rented three vans, driven by the coaches -- another cost-costing measure because vans are significantly less expensive than renting a bus that requires a driver -- and made the 60-mile drive to Bridgeport, Connecticut. They arrived at their hotel around 8 p.m. on Thursday.

The Seawolves competed on Friday night at Bridgeport, coming in second (191.125) in a quad meet. Before making the drive to Providence, Rhode Island, they took the vans in the opposite direction on a team outing to New York City. Some of the gymnasts had never been before.

"We always try to have these fun excursions and highlights as part of these trips," Boggasch said. "There's rarely any unplanned downtime and we usually have a pretty good idea months in advance how we're going to spend our days."

Boggasch, who had been to New York once during her freshman year, was determined to see everything -- the Empire State Building, Grand Central, the Statue of Liberty (from across the river), the Chrysler Building, the financial district, Madison Square Garden and the High Line. A few of the gymnasts tagged along with her for many of the stops, but everyone was free to do their own thing.

"I saw the Brooklyn Bridge and Central Park, but I really just wanted to sit down," Fairbairn said with a laugh. "It was cold, we were in between competitions and I just wasn't up for walking around. But it was still fun."

From there, the team made the 180-mile drive to Brown. On Sunday afternoon, the squad came in second again, this time with a 192.425, in a tri-meet. Monday is usually the only day off during travel weeks, so Boggasch tries to begin the trek home on Sunday. In the past they've left directly from the meet "with glitter still in our hair" said Fairbairn. But this time, Boggasch found cheaper flights on Monday morning, so they stayed in Providence for another night before starting the long trip home. The Seawolves arrived back on campus late that night. Boggasch tries to schedule a week off after a travel week, so the team didn't compete the following weekend.

During other trips the Seawolves remain in one place, as they did during back-to-back meets at Centenary in Shreveport, Louisiana, earlier this month. That journey featured an alligator walking tour during the off-day. (Fairbairn said they didn't see any alligators.)

Those types of trips allow the gymnasts to catch up on schoolwork, and many members of the team brought their laptops to the hotel lobby as a makeshift study hall on the day in between competitions. Fairbairn, who currently has a 4.0 GPA, said their road-heavy schedule can result in missed classes and presents challenges in keeping up with academics, but said her professors have typically been accommodating.

The final weekend in February had originally been the one when the team was planning to host home meets, so when the visiting team canceled, Boggasch scrambled at the last minute to find opponents who had availability -- and also were in areas with tourist attractions. She was successful. The team competed at Illinois State on Friday and at Northern Illinois on Sunday. That left Saturday open to explore Chicago -- and the team even scored a reservation at the original location of famous deep-dish pizzeria Giordano's.

Spending hours and hours crammed into cross-country economy seats on airplanes and in the back of vans might not sound like the ideal conditions ahead of a gymnastics competition. But despite the obvious obstacles, the Seawolves have thrived this season.

Their average score has increased by about 1.5 points from last season and the team's goal of surpassing the program's all-time high score (194.2) feels within reach. Fairbairn, who earned a career-high score of her own on balance beam with a 9.85 at Brown, said the mark has been a motivating factor throughout the season.

"Our best so far is a 192.425, but if we can all put our best stuff together, on the same day, we can break the record," Fairbairn said. "Everyone having their best days on the same day is of course hard but I just feel like this team can achieve that. I'm very realistic and I don't think I've thought this was possible in the past but I know this team can do it. It's an incredible feeling to know what we're capable of."

The Seawolves have two more regular-season meets -- a tri-meet at UC Davis on March 8 and a dual meet at Sacramento State on March 10 -- and then the MPSF conference championships on March 23, also in Sacramento. Boggasch, who was the 2015 conference runner-up on bars, has high hopes for her team for the rest of the season -- but she believes this is just the beginning.

"I would love for everybody to see how much hard work has gone into this team and just give us a couple of years until it really is going to pay off," Boggasch said. "I think we'll see that in the scores and the rankings. We're so grateful for everyone who supported us and we want them to see the transition from us no longer just surviving but excelling. We'll get there."

  • Travel Safety

More Articles

  • The Differences Between Cheerleading & Gymnastics
  • LEGO Compatible Building Blocks
  • What Is a Lifetime Sport?
  • How to Install an Alpha Omega Elite Car Seat
  • Imaginarium Medieval Castle Instructions

What Are the ABC Elements in Gymnastics?

All optional women's gymnastics levels, which are Levels 7 through 10, require gymnasts to perform a certain number of skills. These skills are assigned an element value of A through E, with A being basic beginner skills and E being the most advanced skills. A, B and C skills are required in all level routines, and D and E skills earn bonuses in Level 9 and 10. D and E skills are too advanced for Levels 7 and 8, and you are penalized if you include any of those skills. There is an unlimited amount of A, B and C skills, so listed are only the basics.

Requirements

USA Gymnastics states that Level 7 gymnasts need to include six As and two Bs in their bars, beam and floor routines. Level 8 gymnasts need four As and four Bs. Level 9s need three As, four Bs and one C. Level 10s need three As, three Bs and two Cs. These are only the minimum requirements, so you may include more skills in your routines if you wish, but more skills can mean more deductions, so add extra skills only if you have mastered them.

Beginning optional bar routines all need to have swinging and circling elements. Kips and front hip circles are A skills, as well as the flyaway dismount. Giants, in which the gymnast makes a full circle around the bar in handstand, are a B skill. Cast to handstands also are a B skill. Once the gymnast reaches Level 8, the gymnast needs bar transitions with a flight element. A straddle back to low bar is a B skill, but if you land in a handstand on the low bar, it becomes a C skill.

According to the Junior Olympic Code of Points, most basic tuck, split, wolf and straddle jumps and leaps are A elements, but, add a quarter to a half turn, and they become B elements. If some leaps and jumps involve a full turn in the air, they become C elements. A full 360-degree turn on one leg is an A skill. A one-and-a-half turn on one foot is a B skill and a double or 720-degree turn is a C skill. Handstands are A elements, but add a forward roll or begin with a backward roll, and they are B elements. Back walkovers and cartwheels are A skills 1 . Round-offs, back handsprings and front handsprings are B skills 1 . Standing back and front saltos are C skills 1 .

Many of the elements on beam are the same skill level on floor, except most leaps with a 360-degree turn are still considered B elements, not C. In addition, ring leaps and tour jetes with a 180-degree split and back foot at head height are B elements. All round-off, handspring and back salto variations are A elements. If the salto is in a straight body position with a 180- to 360-degree twist, it is a B element. If it is 540- to 720-degree twist, it is a C element.

Related Articles

  • How to Troubleshoot Slot Cars
  • Games for Kids With Toothpicks
  • Imaginarium Spiral Directions
  • DIY Wooden Swingset on a Budget
  • Hot Wheels Track Instructions
  • Evenflo ExerSaucer Assembly Instructions
  • What Is the Difference Between LEGO & DUPLO?
  • How to Assemble a Disney Princess Indoor/Outdoor Tent
  • What Is the Difference Between USA and AAU Gymnastics?
  • The Difference Between Motor & Cognitive Development
  • How to Make a Simple Catapult Launch a Tennis Ball
  • How to Disassemble a Force FX
  • Recreational Sports Games
  • How to Build Gas-Powered RC Cars
  • How to Create a LEGO Mountain
  • Drills and Skills: Uneven Bars Drills and Skills

what is a tour jete in gymnastics

Riana Rohmann has been working for the Marine Corps doing physical training and writing fitness articles since 2008. She holds personal trainer and advanced health and fitness specialist certifications from the American Council on Exercise and a Bachelor of Science in kinesiology and exercise physiology from California State University-San Marcos.

  • Photodisc/Digital Vision/Getty Images

article divider

PGA Tour: Austin Eckroat wins Cognizant Classic, Shane Lowry & David Skinns fall away

  • Published 3 hours ago

Austin Eckroat lifts the Cognizant Classic trophy

Austin Eckroat won his first title in his second full year on the PGA Tour

Austin Eckroat held off the chasing pack - including Ireland's Shane Lowry and England's David Skinns - to win his first PGA Tour title on a Monday finish at the rain-delayed Cognizant Classic.

The 25-year-old American was 15 under after seven holes on Sunday when play was suspended at the Florida course.

On Monday, Eckroat added three birdies and a bogey to finish 17 under and seal victory on his 50th PGA Tour start.

Lowry and Skinns finished in a five-way tie for fourth place on 13 under.

The pair shared the lead with Eckroat after three rounds at Palm Beach Gardens, but had dropped off the pace on Sunday before resuming their final rounds on Monday.

European Ryder Cup star Lowry saw his hopes of catching Eckroat hit by twice finding water, while 42-year-old Skinns carded a final-round 71 to earn his best finish in his 27 tour appearances.

Eckroat picked up where he left off, playing confidently to maintain the lead throughout and seal a three-shot victory, which secures him a place at the Masters next month.

South Africa's Erik van Rooyen, who was the clubhouse leader on Sunday after finishing on 14-under with a final-round 63, tied for second with Australia's Min-Woo Lee.

Related Topics

Related internet links.

DP World Tour

Ladies European Tour

IMAGES

  1. Tour Jete Turn Conditioning

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

  2. Gymnastics Tour Jete Tutorial With Coach Meggin!

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

  3. Tour Jete on beam

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

  4. Developing the Tour Jete Turn

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

  5. Improve Your Tour Jeté (Jeté en Tournant or Entrelacé)

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

  6. Beam Sissone+Tour Jete' 1/2

    what is a tour jete in gymnastics

COMMENTS

  1. Developing the Tour Jete Turn

    Want to develop your tour jete turns? Check out Tracey Skirton's top tips.Subscribe to BGtv: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=britishgymna...

  2. Gymnastics Tour Jete Tutorial With Coach Meggin!

    Learn how to do this pretty ballet leap great for floor dance for gymnastics! SWITCH LEAP TUTORIAL https://youtu.be/ipNQhH9KoN0 SISSONNE TUTORIAL https://y...

  3. WAG

    Soaring. Coach. Gymnast. Oct 5, 2023. #3. A regular tour jeté is a B. A tour jeté half is a C. I think where some of the confusion comes in is that a regular tour jeté has a half turn in it and the half actually goes 360 degrees around. So if she is doing a tour jeté half then that should be worth the same as a switch half.

  4. Tour Jete Turn Conditioning

    Get fantastic gymnastics conditioning tips from expert coach Tracey SkirtonSubscribe to BGtv: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=britishgymn...

  5. Level 9 Floor Routine Requirements

    Tour jete 1/2, wolf-1/1; Switch-1/2, split-1/1; Wolf-1/1 (landing on 1 foot), double turn; ... In Level 9 gymnastics, gymnasts are expected to perform more difficult skills, but that doesn't mean they can sacrifice technique. Many times, I have seen a less difficult routine, cleanly executed, beat out a difficult routine with more errors. ...

  6. Definition: Tour Jeté

    Definition: Tour Jeté Posted on December 20, 2010 ; by Gymnastics Zone; in Gymnastics Terms; Tour Jeté: A ballet and gymnastics type of leap 1/2 twisting switch split action of the legs taking off one foot and landing on the other the other.It is, in essence, a jeté, which is a leap from one foot to the other, made with a kicking movement of the leg, done with a half turn.

  7. Technique Tuesday: Progressions for Tour Jete 1/2

    This week's gymnastics technique video features Kathryn Geddert, coach of World Champion and Olympic Gold medalist Jordyn Wieber from Twistars Gymnastics. Kathryn shares drill progressions she uses to help her gymnasts master the Tour Jete1/2 or Strug on beam and floor.

  8. Gymnastics Terms Glossary

    When landing from a gymnastics skill the athlete lands with knees bent, lower back rounded, and arms up next to the ears. Snap: A very quick movement of the body, ... Tour jete': Push off one leg while kicking the other leg forward and upward executing a 180 degree turn, switch the legs in the air, and land on the first leg. The take-off leg is ...

  9. BGtv

    Gymnastics Coaching.com. tumbling, tramp, diving, acrobatics, circus, cheer, dance, martial arts, X sports … and more. Menu and widgets

  10. Making Sense of Composition

    Acro Composition Deductions in a Level 10 Floor Routine. The composition deductions for acro level are split into two categories: 3-pass routines and 2-pass routines. The deductions are different in the two categories, with more strict rules for 2-pass routines. If a gymnast does a 3-pass routine, and has a D in all three passes, or 2 D's and ...

  11. Why is the switch full rated the same as a tour-jete full ...

    Before the code that upgraded the switch full (I think 2009) you hardly ever saw athletes attempting that skill yet the Gogean has been competed pretty regularly since Gina debuted it in the late 90s. I'm not sure if anyone has tried a switch 1.5, but I know Claudia Fragapane submitted a Gogean with an extra half twist in Rio but it didn't ...

  12. For this week's Drill the Skill, I'll be demonstrating ...

    For this week's Drill the Skill, I'll be demonstrating the steps to achieve tour jeté. tour jeté: Push off one leg while kicking the other leg forward and upward executing a 180 degree turn, switch the legs in the air, and land on the first leg. *This is the gymnast's first day comprehending the skill.

  13. JO Level 10 Floor Routine Construction

    One of the best things about hitting the pinnacle of JO gymnastics at level 10 is the variety of difficulty and variety of routines. ... Switch ring to tour jete with a half turn - C+C Roundoff backhandspring back layout with triple twist - A+A+E. E Difficuly Level - .2 Bonus.

  14. Tour jeté Definition & Meaning

    The meaning of TOUR JETÉ is a high turning leap in ballet starting with battement and finishing in arabesque —called also jeté en tournant.

  15. gymnastics switch full and Tour Jet'e 1/2

    practice judging for the switch full (D)and the tour jete half (C)

  16. WAG Leaps and jumps turning direction

    Jan 31, 2019. #6. A nice way to distinguish switch with turn and the tour jete technique is looking at the direction of the leap. Switch leaps with turn always travel a long distance whereas tour jete is going more into the height! For the split jump with turn, I teach it this way: turn right, split left, turn right.

  17. JO Level 9 Floor

    Mina Popovic - Level 9 Floor Routine - 9.65. This is a common set of level 9 floor routine passes with the upgraded double back as the first pass and moving the 1.5 to punch pike to the last pass. Roundoff backhandspring double back tuck - A+A+D. Switch leap to Tour Jete with half turn - B+C.

  18. 7 Tips for a More Powerful Tour Jeté

    Let the arms assist: Coordinate your port de bras with your grand battement. The arms go up through high fifth as you take off. They begin to open, Constantinescu says, "right at the top of the jump.". Practice your takeoff and landing at the barre with this combination: Grand battement devant on demi-point, turning towards the barre as you ...

  19. Gymnastics

    For floor, the top 8 skills are counted as part of the D-score with a maximum of 5 tumbling elements and a minimum of 3 dance elements counting. This will mostly consist of C,D and E skills with the best in the world throwing in some really crazy even higher level skills. The adding of these skills will make up the difference between the top ...

  20. What it's like competing for the most remote team in NCAA gymnastics

    Almost twelve years later, she is still there -- and is now the head coach. The school and the team, she said, have given her everything, in and out of the gym.

  21. What exactly is the Gogean on floor? : r/Gymnastics

    I see it mentioned a lot in videos that break down a floor routine but given my general lack of gymnastics knowledge, I struggle to understand what it really is. Usually, I'd google the gymnast the skill is named after and scroll down to eponymous skills, but there's nothing on Gina Gogean's wiki page, neither could I find anything on the internet.

  22. What Are the ABC Elements in Gymnastics?

    All optional women's gymnastics levels, which are Levels 7 through 10, require gymnasts to perform a certain number of skills. ... In addition, ring leaps and tour jetes with a 180-degree split and back foot at head height are B elements. All round-off, handspring and back salto variations are A elements. If the salto is in a straight body ...

  23. tour jete

    tour jete

  24. PGA Tour: Austin Eckroat wins Cognizant Classic, Shane Lowry ...

    Austin Eckroat wins his first PGA Tour title, on a Monday finish at the Cognizant Classic, as Shane Lowry and David Skinns take a share of fourth.

  25. Watch Cognizant Classic, Final Round: Stream PGA Tour golf live

    The Cognizant Classic's final round comes live at 1 p.m. ET on The Golf Channel. There is a three way tie heading into the final round as Shane Lowry, David Skinns and Austin Eckroat all sit at 13 ...

  26. Tour Jeté Gymnastics

    Hello! Welcome to TJG's official channel. We will be posting videos of fun activities, competitions, and more! We are a roblox gymnastics group that has been around since 2017 and recently ...