The True Japan

11 Natural Ways to Say “Come Here” in Japanese

A young, Asian woman with her right hand at her waist and her left hand held up in front of her with her left pointer finger pointing back at herself. It appears as if she is telling someone to come over. The background is dark yellowish.

There is a simple way to say “Come here” in Japanese. However, there are many other less direct and polite ways to say it.  

Here are 10 natural ways to say “Come here” in Japanese.

1. Standard Expression: ここに来て下さい (Koko Ni Kite Kudasai): Please Come Here

ここに来て下さい ( Koko ni kite kudasai ) is the typical phrase that means “Please come here” in Japanese. It is probably the most straightforward way to ask someone to “come here.” However, it sounds a little too direct and can sound childish, so I recommend not using it with people you respect or who have a higher social status than you (your boss, elders, people with a higher seniority than you, etc.).  

ここ ( koko ) means “here.” に ( ni ) is a particle that marks a direction (in this sentence, it means “to here.”)

“来て” ( kite ) is the te -form of the verb 来る ( kuru ), which means “to come.” 下さい ( kudasai ) means “please.”

You could replace the ここに ( koko ni ) with こちらに ( kochira ni ), which also means “here.”  こちらに sounds a bit more conversational and natural.  

1. 見せたいものがあるので、 こちらに来て下さい 。 ( Misetai mono ga aru node kochira ni kite kudasa i . ) I have something to show you, so please come here .

2. コンサートチケットを買うためには、 ここに来て下さい 。 ( Konsāto chiketto o kau tame ni wa koko ni kite kudasai . ) To buy a concert ticket, please come here . 

As mentioned above, 来て ( kite ) is the te -form of the verb 来る ( kuru ). One of the functions of the te -form is to turn verbs into a request. Let’s see how:

Examples:  

1.  来て ! かわいい猫がいるよ! ( Kite ! Kawaii neko ga iru yo !) Come here ! There’s a cute cat here!

2.  来て来て !虹が出てるよ! ( Kite kite * ! Niji ga deteru yo !) Quick, come here ! Come here! There’s a rainbow!

*Note:   You can say “来て! ( Kite !)” to someone very close to you, such as friends or family. You can also say 来て ( kite ) multiple times together when you are excited, worried, or anytime you want to emphasize that you want someone to come quickly.

2. Casual Expression: ここにおいで (Koko Ni Oide): Come Here

This is a casual way to say, “Come here. ” You could say おいで ( oide ) to tell someone to come, but usually only parents say this to their children or pets. Someone of higher status could say it to someone of lower status as well. Since this expression is casual, it is inappropriate to use it with anyone with a higher social status than you.

1. ポチ! おいで ! ( Pochi!  Oide ! ) Pochi!  Come here ! (Pochi is their dog’s name)

2. はなちゃん、おばあちゃんが抱っこしてあげるから おいで 。 ( Hana-chan, obāchan ga dakko shite ageru kara oide .) Hana, grandma will carry you, so come here .

You could replace the ここに ( koko ni ) with こっちに ( kocchi ni ) for any of these sentences.  こっちに also means “here” but is more casual and natural in everyday conversations. こっちに is the casual version of こちらに ( kochira ni ).   Since these example sentences are very casual, using こっちに would be more appropriate.  

3. Rough Expression: ここ/こっちにに来い!(Koko/Kocchi Ni Koi! ): Come Here!  

来い ( koi ) is a very rough way to tell someone to come. Using it in the wrong situation would make it sound rude. Since this is a rough expression, it is used mainly by men. It can be used casually with people you know well, like your friends. Or it could be used by someone of higher status demanding someone to come to them (like a boss and their employees or a parent to their child).  

1. 早く 来い !遅刻するぞ! ( Hayaku koi ! Chikoku suru zo !) Come here right now! You’ll be late!

2. 早く 来い !グズグズ ** するな! ( Hayaku koi ! Guzuguzu suru na !) Come here right now! We have no time!

**Note:   グズグズする ( guzuguzu suru ) means to take a long time to do something even if there’s not time to spare. If you are irritated at someone and want to say “Hurry up!” or “Don’t waste your time!”, you can say “グズグズしないで! ( Guzuguzu shinai de !)”. But please remember that this expression is very strong and direct and can come off rude if said to the wrong person.

 3.  来い よ!公園で遊ぼうぜ! ( Koi yo! Kōen de asobō ze !) Hey! Come here ! Let’s play together in the park!

4. Rough Expression: ここ/こっちにに来なさい (Koko/Kocchi Ni Kinasai ): Come Here! 

来なさい ( kinasai ) is used by both men and women. The nasai -form is often used by parents and teachers when talking to their children or students. This expression is often used as a command, telling someone to do something. Therefore, you would not use it in formal situations or with people with a higher social status than you.  

A teacher is talking to their students:

名前を呼ばれたらここに 来なさい 。 ( Namae o yobaretara koko ni kinasai .) Come here when your name is called.

5. Feminine/Gentle Expression: ここ/こっちににいらっしゃい (Koko/Kocchi Ni Irasshai):  

This is the gentle way to say, “come here.” It sounds feminine, so women primarily use it. However, you would not say ここにいらっしゃい ( Koko ni irasshai .) to other adults if you wanted them to come to you. This is because this phrase has a child-like quality to it, like a mother telling her little child to come to her.

1. 健史くん、 こっちにいらっしゃい 。お母さんがお口を拭いてあげるから。 ( Takeshi-kun kocchi ni irasshai . Okāsan ga okuchi o fuite ageru kara .) Takeshi, come here . I’ll wipe your mouth.

2. はなちゃん、 ここにいらっしゃい 。靴の紐が解けているからお母さんが結んであげる。 ( Hana-chan koko ni irasshai . Kutsu no himo ga hodoketeiru kara okāsan ga musunde ageru .) Han, come here . Your shoelaces are untied. Mama will tie it for you.   

6. Polite Expression: お越しください (Okoshi Kudasai): Please Come (To Visit) Us

This is a polite way to ask someone to come and visit you. Businesses often use this phrase, but you can also use it in your daily conversations to be polite.  

1. 明日までこの絵を展示していますので、是非 お越しください 。 ( Ashita/Asu made kono e o tenji shiteimasu node zehi okoshi kudasa i. ) This painting will be on display until tomorrow, so please come to see it.

2. 我が家に是非 お越しください 。 ( Wagaya ni zehi okoshi kudasa i .) Please come visit us.

7. Polite Expression: いらしてください (Irashite Kudasai): Please Come (To Visit) Us

This is another polite way ( keigo – Japanese honorific langauge ) to ask someone to come and visit you. It is often used by businesses to tell their customers to come again.  

This expression comes from the honorofic verb いらっしゃる ( irassharu ), which means “to be” or “to come/go.” Changing it to the te-form adding ください ( kudasai ) gives you “いらっしゃってください ( Irasshatte kudasai ).” This is a respectful way to tell someone to “please come visit us again.”

いらっしゃってください ( irasshatte kudasai )is often shortened to いらしてください ( irashite kudasai ) which makes it more casual.  

It is better to say いらっしゃってください ( Irasshatte kudasai ) when speaking to people with a high social status (boss, customers, etc.)

1. 我が家に是非 いらしてください。/ いらっしゃってください 。 ( Wagaya ni zehi irashite kudasai . ) / ( irasshatte kudasai .) Please come visit us.

2. 展示会を開催しますので、是非 いらしてください 。/ いらっしゃってください 。 ( Tenjikai o kaisai shimasu node zehi irashite kudasai .) / ( irasshatte kudasai .) We will be holding an exhibition, so please come to see it.

8. Polite Expression: お立ち寄りください (Otachiyori Kudasai): Please Come and Stop By

The nuance of this phrase is, “If you are in the neighborhood/area, please stop by.” It is rare to use this expression in business. It is more often used in people’s everyday conversations. 

お立ち寄りください ( Otachiyori kudasai ) gives off the vibe of “stop by,” which implies a quick visit. So if you want to be extra sincere (and really want someone to come over to your place and hang out), this would not be the best phrase to use.   

9. Polite Expression: おいで下さい (Oide Kudasai) (Polite): Please Come Visit

In expression #2 on this list, we said thatここに おいで ( oide ) is a casual phrase that you shouldn’t use with people who has a higher social status than you. However, using おいで with ください (kudasai) changes it into a polite expression asking someone to come and visit you. This expression is used when talking to people you respect or who have a high social status.  

You might hear “ようこそおいでくださいました。( Yōkoso oide kudasaimashita .)” when you stay at a Japanese-style hotel or inn. This means, “Welcome. Thank you for visiting us.” It can be used as an expression of hospitality in businesses.

1. 我が家へ おいでください 。 ( Wagaya e oide kudasa i . ) Please come visit us.

2. 是非東京へ おいで下さい 。 ( Zehi Tōkyō e oide kudasai . ) Please come visit Tokyo.

If you want to ask someone in an even more gentle and polite way, you can also say:

おいでいただけませんか? ( Oide itadakemasen ka ?) Would you be able to come and visit us?

3. 我が家へ おいでいただけませんか ? ( Wagaya e oide itadakemasen ka ?) Would you be able to come and visit us?

10. Very Polite Expression: お待ちしております (Omachi Shite Orimasu): I Will Be Waiting for You

It means “I/We will be waiting for you.” This is a convenient expression because it can be used not only for people but also for things such as emails, phone calls, etc.

If you want to be super polite, you can say:  お待ち申し上げております。 ( Omachi mōshiagete orimasu. ) I will (humbly) wait for you.  

However, keep in mind that this phrase makes it very formal.  It is used in business settings or very formal situations.  It is not used in casual conversations.  

1. 隆史: 明日は10時に伺います。 Takashi : ( Asu / Ashita wa jyūji ni ukagaimasu .) Takashi: I will visit you at 10 o’clock tomorrow.

    洋子: お待ちしております。/ お待ち申し上げております 。 Y ō ko : ( Omachi shite orimasu ./ Omachi mōshiagete orimasu .) Yoko: I will be waiting for you.  

2. 隆史: 会議の日程が決まったら連絡して欲しいのですが。 Takashi : ( Kaigi no nittei ga kimattara renraku shite hoshii no desu ga .) Takashi: Would you be able to contact me when the schedule for the meeting is decided?

    洋子: かしこまりました。決まり次第ご連絡致します。 Yōko : ( Kashikomarimashita. Kimari shidai gorenraku itashimasu .) Yoko: Ok. I will let you know as soon as it is decided.

    隆史:お待ちしております。/ お待ち申し上げております。 Takashi : ( Omachi shite orimasu . / Omachi mōshiagete orimasu .) Takashi: I’ll be waiting to hear from you.

11. Polite Expression: 足を運ぶ (Ashi O Hakobu): Come All the Way 

足 ( ashi ) means “foot or leg,” and 運ぶ ( hakobu ) means “to bring, to carry.” So this expression can be translated as “bringing your feet/legs somewhere. In other words, you went the extra mile to “come all this way.” 

You should never use this expression to talk about yourself (i.e., “I came all this way.” It would be considered rude if you tell your boss or someone you need to respect that you made an “extra” effort to come and see them.  

So be sure to use this expression only when talking about someone else.  

Correct Usage: Talking About Someone Else

わざわざ 足を運んで いただきありがとうございます。 ( Wazawaza ashi o hakonde itadaki arigatō gozaimasu .) Thank you for taking the trouble to come all this way . (The subject is “you” in this sentence.)

Incorrect Usage: Talking About Yourself

あなたに会うために私は 足を運びました 。 ( Anata ni au tame ni watashi wa ashi o hakobimashita .) I came all the way to see you. (The subject is “I” in this sentence.) – If you say this, people may think you are being sarcastic.  

Using Gestures: USA Vs Japan

Do you know that the gesture for the phrase “go away” in the USA means the opposite in Japan? In the USA, putting your fingers down and waving them towards yourself signals someone to go away. However, this gesture means “come here” in Japan, as long as the gesture is made with the fingers and not the whole arm.  

This is just a small thing, but it can make a big difference!

Photo of author

Yumi Nakata

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16 Ways to Say “Please” in Japanese from Onegai and Onward

Being polite is an integral part of Japanese culture.

So knowing how to say “please” in Japanese is a must for social interactions!

You may know some of the basics, like  onegai and kudesai.  But do you know how and when to actually use them? 

And what if you need to say “please” in some more specific social situations? 

Read on to learn everything you need to know about the polite word, “please”!

お願い (Onegai) — Please

お願いします (onegai shimasu) — please [polite].

  • お願い申し上げます (Onegai moushi agemasu) — I humbly request [very polite]

ください (Kudasai) — Please [for a request]

ちょうだい (choudai) — please give, プリーズ (purīzu) — please [casual], 願わくば (negawakuba) — if i may humbly request, …いただけないでしょうか (…itadakenaideshou ka) — could you please, additional phrases to use with “please” in japanese, 是非 (zehi) — by all means, absolutely, もしよろしければ (moshi yoroshikereba) — if it’s okay with you, ご検討いただければ幸いです (gokentou itadakereba saiwai desu) — i would be grateful if you could consider, どうか (douka) — somehow, 申し訳ございませんが… (moushiwake gozaimasenga…) — i’m sorry, but…, 大変お手数ですが… (taihen otesuu desu ga…) — i apologize for the trouble, but…, お時間のある時に (o-jikan no aru toki ni) — at your convenience, ご都合の良い時に (go-tsugou no yoi toki ni) — when it suits you , and one more thing....

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This is the most basic way to say “please” in Japanese, and the one you’re most likely to already know. It’s a neutral, all-purpose way to say “please.”

The term originates from the Japanese verb “negau” (願う), which means “to wish” or “to request.” So literally, the word means “I request.”

Not sure which form of please to use? This is the general term to default to. You’ll be understood in any situation!

もう少し静かにして、 お願い 。 (Mōsukoshi shizuka ni shite, onegai .) — Please be a bit quieter.

お会計 お願い 。 (O-kaikei onegai .) — Please bring the bill.

You better believe that in Japanese, the already polite word “please” has several even more polite forms!

Onegai shimasu is a more polite form of  onegai, which means you generally use it when making a request to someone of higher status or authority, or just in a more formal setting. 

It’s a combination of お願い (onegai), meaning “request” or “favor,” and the polite verb ending します (shimasu), which is the polite form of the verb “to do.” Together, it translates to “please do (something)” or “please (do) me a favor.”

会議の資料を送ってもらえると助かります。 お願いします 。 (Kaigi no shiryou o okutte moraeru to tasukari masu. Onegai shimasu. ) — It would be helpful if you could send me the meeting materials. Please.

お願いします 、あなたのアドバイスが必要です。 ( Onegai shimasu, anata no adobaisu ga hitsuyou desu.) — Please, I need your advice.

お願い申し上げます (Oneg ai moushi  agemasu)  — I humbly request [very polite]

This is the most polite form of  onegai,  the final evolution in formality, if you will. The expression adds the polite “moushiagemasu,” which is a humble form of the verb “to say” or “to express.” 

It’s used in the most formal situations, such as when making a request to a dignitary. You’re not that likely to use it yourself (unless you’ve got some connections in the higher echelons of Japanese society) but you might hear it in news reports or other official media. 

お手伝いいただければ幸いです。 お願い申し上げます 。 (O-tetsudai itadakereba saiwai desu. Onegai moushi agemasu .) — I would be grateful if you could help. I sincerely request your assistance.

こちらをお貸しいただけますと助かります。 お願い申し上げます 。 (Kochira wo okashi itadakemasuto tasukari masu. Onegai moushi agemasu .) — I would appreciate it if you could lend me this. Thank you very much.

Kudasai is derived from the verb くださる (kudasaru), which is a polite way of saying “to give” or “to do for me.” 

The word is a more casual and direct way of making a request. It’s used in most everyday situations and doesn’t carry the same respect and humility as  onegai. 

If you just want to ask your sister to pass the salt, use kudasai. If you want to ask your coworker to help you carry all your notes to the meeting, use onegai.  

It’s pretty easy to use, as you can literally just add  kudasai  to whatever it is you want. If you’re requesting a noun, use this sentence structure:

 [Object] をください ([Object] o kudasai)

For a verb, you’ll need to use the verb’s te-form, like this: 

[Verb in te-form] ください ([Verb in te-form] kudasai)

飲み物を ください 。 (Nomimono o kudasai .) — Please give me a drink.

座って ください 。 (Suwatte kudasai .) — Please sit down.

メニューを ください 。 (Menyū o kudasai .) — Please give me the menu.

Choudai is similar to  kudasai in usage and meaning, but it’s a more casual term. It has a childish ring to it—picture a little kid asking their parent to buy them something at the store. 

水を ちょうだい 。 (Mizu o choudai .) — Water, please.

本を ちょうだい 。 (Hon o choudai .) — The book, please.

もう一度説明して ちょうだい 。 (Mō ichido setsumei shite choudai .) — Please explain it again.

Sound familiar? This is a borrowed word from English, used in very casual settings. It’s especially used among younger people, usually in spoken communication. 

もう一度教えてくれる? プリーズ 。 (Mou ichido oshiete kureru? Purīzu .) — Can you tell me one more time? Please.

ちょっと手伝ってくれる? プリーズ 。 (Chotto tetsudatte kureru? Purīzu .) — Can you help me for a moment? Please.

Here’s one for the history books, literally. This term is an archaic expression that literally means “if it may be wished for.” The phrase is used to express a polite request or a wish, often found in formal or written language. It’s not commonly used in everyday spoken Japanese, but you might encounter it in literature or older texts.

願わくば 、お手すきの際にお知らせいただければと存じます。 ( Negawakuba , otesuki no sai ni oshirase itadakereba tozonjimasu.) — If I may humbly request, I would appreciate it if you could let me know when you have a moment.

願わくば 、ご意見をお聞かせいただければと考えております。 ( Negawakuba , otesuki no sai ni oshirase itadakereba tozonjimasu.) — If I may be so bold as to ask, I would like to hear your opinion.

This one might sound familiar, too—it’s rooted in the verb だく (itadaku), which means “to receive” and is also the root for the phrase you say before you eat,  itadakimasu. 

Here’s a more detailed breakdown of this expression: 

  • いただけない (Itadakenai): This is the potential form of the verb いただく (itadaku), which means “to receive” or “to be given.” The potential form here implies the ability or possibility to receive or do something.
  • でしょうか (deshou ka): This is a polite expression that is often added to a sentence to make a request. It softens the request and adds a sense of politeness.

So, the whole phrase いただけないでしょうか (…Itadakenaideshou ka) translates to something like “Could I receive?” or “Would it be possible for me to receive?” This expression is commonly used in formal or polite situations where you want to make a request in a respectful manner.

この資料をお送り いただけないでしょうか ? (Kono shiryou wo o-okuri itadakenaideshou ka ?) — Could you please send me this document?

この問題について助言を いただけないでしょうか ? (Kono mondai ni tsuite jogen o itadakenaideshou ka ?) — Could you please give me some advice on this issue?

The following words don’t mean “please” on their own. Instead, they’re often used in conjunction with one of the words you just learned above.

They can make the difference between a simple request like “Menu, please” and “If it’s convenient for you, by all means, please procure the menu for me.” 

Of course, you don’t have to go full Jeeves on the waiter like I did in the above example, but the phrases below add an extra layer of politeness and consideration for the person you’re asking something of. 

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This phrase is used to express strong desire or intention, close to the English expression “would you kindly?”

It can be used to emphasize a request or to make it clear that you’re asking for something specifically. It’s often used to convey a strong recommendation or a sincere desire for something to be done. 

是非 、お知らせください。 ( Zehi, oshirase kudasai.) — By all means, please let me know.

是非 、ご意見をお聞かせください。 ( Zehi, go-iken o okikase kudasai.) — Absolutely, please share your opinion with us.

This phrase politely asks for something if it’s convenient for the other person. It’s a good expression to use when you’re asking for permission, making a suggestion or making a polite request from someone. 

もしよろしければ 、明日の会議にご参加いただけますでしょうか? ( Moshi yoroshikereba , ashita no kaigi ni go-sanka itadakemasu deshou ka?) — If it’s okay with you, could you please join the meeting tomorrow?

その資料を もしよろしければ 、ご確認いただけますでしょうか? (Sono shiryou o moshi yoroshikereba , go-kakunin itadakemasu deshou ka?) — If it’s okay with you, could you please review that document?

This extra formal phrase is often used in formal or business communication to politely request someone’s thoughtful consideration or review of a matter. 

ご検討いただければ幸いです 。新しいプロジェクトにご参加いただけますと幸いです。 ( Gokentou itadakereba saiwai desu . Atarashii purojekuto ni go-sanka itadakemasu to saiwai desu.) — I would be grateful if you could consider it. I would appreciate it if you could participate in the new project.

この提案を ご検討いただければ幸いです 。 (Kono teian wo gokentou itadakereba saiwai desu . ) — I would be grateful if you could consider this proposal. 

This emphasizes your wish or request, often used with other formal phrases like “onegaishimasu.” It’s used to make a polite request or to express a hope or wish, giving your request a more earnest tone. 

どうか お願いします。 ( Douka onegaishimasu.) — Please, I humbly request.

お手数をおかけしますが、 どうか お願いいたします。   (Otesuu wo okake shimasu ga, douka onegai itashimasu.) — I apologize for the inconvenience, but please, I request [your understanding/help].”

This phrase is often used to convey a sense of apology or to soften the impact of delivering unwelcome news. You can use it in conjunction with the words that mean “please” to apologize for any inconvenience before making a request. 

お手数をおかけして 申し訳ございませんが 、もう一度ご確認いただけますでしょうか? (Otesuu wo okakeshite moushiwake gozaimasen ga , mou ichido go-kakunin itadakemasu deshou ka?) — I’m sorry, but could you please check it again for me?

申し訳ございませんが 、もう一度お時間をいただければと存じます。 ( Moushiwake gozaimasen ga , mou ichido o-jikan wo itadakereba to zonjimasu.) — I’m sorry, but if I could have a little more of your time, I would appreciate it.

This phrase acknowledges that the request might be troublesome before asking. It’s another way to express an apology before making a request.

大変お手数ですが 、今一度メールをご確認いただけますでしょうか? ( Taihen otesuu desu ga , ima ichido me-ru wo go-kakunin itadakemasu deshou ka?) — I’m sorry to bother you, but could you please check your email once again?

大変お手数ですが 、お名前と連絡先を教えていただけますでしょうか? ( Taihen otesuu desu ga , o-namae to renrakusaki wo oshiete itadakemasu deshou ka?) — I apologize for the trouble, but could you please provide your name and contact information?

Use this one exactly as you’d use the English translation, to ask for something from someone else when they have the time to complete your request. It’s a polite way to ask for someone’s time or attention without directly imposing on their schedule. 

Although it can be used in any formality level, it’s more on the formal side and is more often used in professional settings. 

お時間のある時に 、お電話いただけますでしょうか? ( O-jikan no aru toki ni , o-denwa itadakemasu deshou ka?) — When you have a moment, would you please give me a call?

お時間のある時に 、ご意見をお聞かせいただけますと幸いです。 ( O-jikan no aru toki ni , go-iken wo o-kikase itadakemasuto saiwai desu.) — When you have time, I would be happy if you could share your opinions.

This phrase is very similar to the previous, with a stronger emphasis on the request recipient’s convenience. It’s another polite way to request someone’s time or attention. 

ご都合の良い時に 、ご一緒にランチはいかがでしょうか? ( Go-tsugou no yoi toki ni , go-issho ni ranchi ikaga deshou ka?) — Whenever you’re free, how about going to lunch together?

ご都合の良い時に 、この提案についてご検討いただけますでしょうか? ( Go-tsugou no yoi toki ni , kono teian ni tsuite go-kentou itadakemasu deshou ka?) — At your convenience, could you please consider this proposal?

Now go ahead and study these ways to say “please” in Japanese, at your earliest convenience. Please and thank you!

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please visit us again in japanese

Closeup portrait of small Asian girl asking please with hands clasped, isolated on pastel pink studio wall

How To Say ‘Please’ In Japanese

Asking someone for a service or favour is never complete without saying ‘please’ and i n Japanese, ‘please’ is usually translated as either onegaishimasu or kudasai . But what’s the difference between these two words and are there more? 

Yes, there are many words for ‘please’ in Japanese and as always, context is king! Saying ‘please’ in Japanese can change depending on whether you’re asking for something from a friend, a child, a waitress or your boss. 

There are also some words for ‘please’ in Japanese with more of a feminine or masculine nuance.

Understanding which word is more appropriate is just as important as memorizing the word itself! Do you share a close relationship with the person? Is it a formal setting where you would like to highlight the position of the listener? Perhaps you want to humble yourself when making a request or maybe you want to indicate your authority! 

Whatever the scenario, here are the must-know phrases for how to say ‘please’ in Japanese! 

下さい / ください Please (give me something / do something)

Kudasai literally means ‘please give me’ and is used to make simple, neutral requests with either a verb or a noun, for example mite kudasai (look please) or kohi kudasai (coffee please). Though it’s not the most polite way of saying ‘please’ in Japanese, it’s fine to use kudasai when asking for something of somebody who is equal to or inferior to you in age / rank / status or when ordering something as a customer.  

At an izakaya (a Japanese pub) you could order drink by saying:

Nama wo futatsu kudasai!  生を二つください! なまをふたつください! Two draft beers please! (Two beers on tap)

Close-up of two glasses of draught beer on the table of an izakaya in Tokyo, Japan.

As you can see, you can specify ‘how much’ of something you’d like to request, by using the を particle followed by the counter, for example: mikan wo hitotsu kudasai (ミカンを一つください) ‘one orange please’.

Kudasai can sound quite direct compared to onegaishimasu (which we will go over next). You would never use kudasai to someone of superior rank within a workplace for example.

To make a simple request using kudasai , you can either say noun + kudasai  or you can use the – te form of a verb as follows: 

Suwatte kudasai .  座って ください 。 すわってください。 Please sit down.

Koko ni sainshite kudasai .  ここにサインして ください 。 Please sign here.

It would be rude if you removed kudasai from the above phrases and instead just say suwatte (sit) or koko ni sainshite (sign here) , unless you were speaking to a friend. 

In customer service settings, the verb matsu 待つ (to wait) is often used with kudasai but with it’s – masu form which is machimasu (待ちます). So instead of using the -te form and saying 待ってください its more polite to say お待ちください which is basically the difference between ‘wait please’ vs ‘just one moment please’. 

Young Japanese woman working in coffee shop, operating the coffee machine.

A receptionist at a hotel would never say matte kudasai (please wait) to a customer, instead they would say:

Shou shou o machi kudasai. 少々お待ちください。 しょうしょう おまちください。 Wait a moment, please. / Please wait a little. / Please hold for a moment (on the phone)

Or in some cases, chotto matte kudasai (ちょっと待ってください)can be used to soften the phrase. 

Kudasaimase is the polite, imperative form of kudasai used by staff in customer-service settings to make respectful requests to customers in a shop.

Kudasaimase is more commonly used by those identifying as females and is formed by adding – mase to the end of kudasai, allowing staff to gently command customers (who are considered above them) to do something:

Tsutsu ga naku o sugoshi kudasaimase. つつがなくお過ごしくださいませ 。 つつがなく おすごし くださいませ 。 Please take your time without any trouble. 

Kudasai sounds very formal when used with friends. A good alternative you can use in casual settings is choudai (ちょうだい) see below!

Onegaishimasu

お願いします / おねがいします Please (polite)

Onegashimasu is a very useful phrase for saying ‘please’ in Japanese because it’s universally polite so it can be used in almost any situation. It comes from the noun negau (願う) which means ‘hope’. 

Onegaishimasu focuses on politely requesting as opposed to asking someone to give something to you or do something for you like kudasai. 

The cool thing about onegaishimasu is that on it’s own, it is an honorific form of saying ‘please’ in Japanese but it can easily be made more polite or more casual to suit your needs. 

For example, you can just say onegai (お願い)to a friend if you want to request something from them like kohi onegai (コヒーお願い) to say ‘coffee please!’. 

On the other hand, when you want to elevate the position of the person you are speaking to, you change the ending to itashimasu as in onegai itashimasu !

Some say that onegaishimasu and kudasai are interchangeable, but onegaishimasu is actually far more appropriate in a professional setting. The fact that you can use onegaishimasu but not kudasai towards someone superior demonstrates this. 

You can still use onegaishimasu in the same way as kudasai when ordering something at a restaurant, so like our beer example above, you could say nama wo futatsu onegaishimasu (生を二つお願いします)。

If you’re about to pay for something and you are asked whether you’ll pay by card or cash, you can say ‘card please’ by saying kaado de onegaishimasu (カードでお願いします)。

Onegaishimasu is also used by itself in a few situations. You can use it to politely get the attention of an employee at a restaurant. If you see a waiter / waitress who seems to be free, you can just call out sumimasen, onegaishimasu ! (すみません、お願いします!) and they will respond ‘ haii!’ and quickly attend to you.

The other way to use onegaishimasu by itself is when responding to someone and in this case it has the same meaning as ‘yes please!’

For example, if you went to a store to try on a t-shirt and it was too small, the staff member might offer to get you a bigger size by saying o kyaku sama ni motto ookii no saizu motte kimasu ka? / お客様にもっと大きいのサイズ持ってきますか?(Should I get a larger size for you?) You can simply respond onegaishimasu! It would not work to say kudasai here. 

young woman clothes shopping in Japan, holding up beige sweater to herself

頂戴 / ちょうだい Please (informal)

Choudai is a casual expression to say ‘please’ in Japanese and while it can be used by both men and women, it has a feminine nuance. The reason is because mothers use choudai when talking to children in an imperative way for example ‘please eat’ as in tabete choudai  (食べてちょうだい) or ‘ show me please’ as in misete choudai (見せてちょうだい).

If you wanted to have a piece of your friend’s food you could say chotto choudai (ちょっとちょうだい)  which means ‘Can I have a bit?’ or ‘Can I have a piece?’ 

Three hands holding chopsticks over a sushi platter. Use 'chodai' to say please in Japanese when asking to try your friend's food.

Significant others can also use choudai when asking each other to do something, for example ‘get me a pen please’: pen choudai  (ペンちょうだい。) 

Like most words for ‘please’ in Japanese, you can modify the politeness by adding honorific stems to choudai.

Many supermarket cashiers, particularly female, will use choudai with the polite stem – itashimasu when telling you how much you need to pay. For example:

Sen ni hyaku en de choudai itashimasu.  1,200円で頂戴致します. 1,200えんでちょうだいいたします。 That will be 1,200 yen please. 

どうぞ Please (accept this) 

Douzo has two main uses: a way to offer something to someone in the same way we would say ‘Please help yourself’ ‘Please, have ~ / take ~ ’ in English or as a way to give permission as in ‘please, go ahead’. 

Young Japanese waitress in Japanese restaurant passing out glasses of coke. She would use the word douzo, meaning please or here you are.

When employees speak to customers in Japan, they often use douzo to politely usher them into trying something or inviting them to take a look at something. 

A host may say to a guest, douzo wo agari kudasai (どうぞを上がりください)which is literally ‘please come up’ but means ‘please, come in’. 

While pouring you a glass of water and placing it on the table the waiter / waitress might say o mizu douzo (お水をどうぞ) which is like ‘Here’s some water’. 

It’s also common to use douzo as ‘Please, after you’ when giving permission to someone to do something. For example, when leaving a room with a group of people, the person holding the door might say douzo with an open hand gesture to tell you to go first or if you were at a shop looking for something and the staff member wanted you to follow them, they would say kochira e douzo (こちらへどうぞ) as in ‘this way please’. 

Young Japanese woman in red floral kimono smiling facing camera with welcome hand gesture, indicating please come in, standing against wooden wall of a traditional Japanese home in background.

In formal speech, douzo is used to add extra politeness in combination with kudasai or onegaishimasu in some set phrases:  

Douzo o kake kudasai. どうぞおかけてください。 Please have a seat. 

Douzo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.  どうぞよろしくお願いします。 どうぞよろしくおねがいします。 Pleased to meet you. / It’s a pleasure to meet you 

Douzo on it’s own is used when you want to politely offer something to someone, similar to how we say ‘here you go’ in English. Informally, people also say hai (はい) when they want to give you something, but douzo is much more polite and formal. 

Finally, douzo is used to give permission for example if someone says ‘May I take a photo?’ You can politely say ‘sure, go ahead’ by using douz o. 

プーリズ Please

Japanese versions of English words can be difficult to understand, so we needed to include puurizu as one of the ways to say ‘please’ in Japanese, just so you know what you’re hearing if you ever go to Japan!

Again, the use of katakana in this phrase clearly tells us it’s a foreign word, and indeed puurizu is just ‘please’ with Japanese-friendly pronunciation. 

It’s casual and is sometimes used in conjunction with douzo if a store employee is aware that you don’t speak Japanese. They may try to express their desire for you to help yourself or feel free to look around by saying puurizu! 

Set phrases which use kudasai or onegaishimasu

There are set phrases which only use either kudasai OR onegaishimasu such as ‘ganbatte kudasai’ which means ‘Do your best!’. You do not say ganbatte onegaishimasu . 

Similarly, you can say yoroshiku onegaishimasu when you meet someone for the first time, but you do not say yoroshiku kudasai – you will get some very strange looks!

A note on making polite requests in Japanese 

We often say the word ‘please’ in English when we want to make polite requests in formal situations starting with ‘Can’ ‘Could’ or ‘May’’ for example ‘Can I have your name please?’ or ‘Could you call me a taxi please?’ 

In Japanese there are set phrases to make polite requests such as these, instead of directly saying ‘please’:

(request)  +   shite mo ii desu ka? (〜してもいいですか?)casual

  • kuremasen ka?  (〜くれませんか?) formal / polite
  • itadakemasen ka? (〜いただけませんか?)  very formal / polite

For example:

Kore wo kopii shite mo ii desu ka? これをコピーしてもいいですか?  Can I copy this please?

Shio wo watashite kuremasen ka? 塩を渡してくれませんか?  しおをわたしてくれませんか? Could you pass me the salt please?

The word ‘please’ is inclusive in the question when you phrase it this way. You don’t need to say kudasai or onegaishimasu.  

Depending on how polite you would like to make the phrase, you can choose itadakemasen ka? to be very polite. 

For example, even though you could say: 

Mou ichido itte kudasai. もう一致度言ってください もういっちどいってください Please repeat that one more time.

It would be more polite to say: 

Mou ichido itte itadakemasen ka? もう一致度言っていただけませんか もういっちどいっていただけませんか Could you please repeat that one more time?

More essential Japanese phrases:

  • How to Say ‘Thank You’ in Japanese
  • How to Say Sorry in Japanese: Apologize Like You Mean it
  • How to Say Hello in Japanese: 19 Different Ways 
  • How to Say Goodbye in Japanese: 16 Useful Ways
  • How to Say Yes in Japanese: ‘Hai’ and Beyond!
  • How to Say No in Japanese: 11 Ways

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How to say please in Japanese: infographic showing some different ways to say please in Japanese.

Francesca Rex-Horoi

Francesca is a freelance copywriter and teacher, who moved to Tokyo from New Zealand at age 24. A linguistics and ESL major, she spent 3 years teaching at an all-boys high school. Now based in France, she remains a self-confessed Japanophile who loves kanji, cooking, cats and the outdoors.

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How to Say “Please in Japanese”: Mastering Politeness

The most common way to express "please" is "ください (kudasai)", which is used when asking for something. This word is usually placed at the end of a sentence after the object that you are requesting. Another term, "お願いします (onegaishimasu)", is often used in a more formal or solemn context. It is generally used to make serious requests or ask for favors.

Table of Contents

please visit us again in japanese

If you've ever interacted with Japanese culture, you'll know that politeness and respect are deeply ingrained in its fabric. Central to this is the concept of saying 'please' - a simple yet powerful word that can transform a command into a polite request. 

In this blog post, we'll explore the different ways of saying 'please', including 'kudasai', 'onegai shimasu', 'douzo', and 'chodai'. Each phrase will be examined in depth, looking at its nuances, usage, and pronunciation. 

The post will also provide examples of common phrases incorporating 'please', giving you practical knowledge that you can apply in real-life situations.

Let's get started!

'Kudasai' (ください): A Casual Request

please visit us again in japanese

One of the most common ways to say 'please' in Japanese is 'kudasai'. This word springs from the verb 'kudasaru' meaning 'to give'. While it sounds formal in English, 'kudasai' is actually quite casual in Japanese!

Exploring the Usage of 'Kudasai' 

Kudasai' is generally used when you're asking for something that the other person has. For instance, if you're at a restaurant and want to ask for water, you'd say 'mizu o kudasai' ('water, please') . It's that simple!

Appropriate Situations to Use 'Kudasai'

'Kudasai' is perfect for casual situations or when you're talking to someone with whom you're familiar. It's also widely used with strangers or in customer service, especially when asking for an item or a favor. 

'Onegai Shimasu' (お願いします): Asking for a Favor

Another popular way to say 'please' in Japanese is 'onegai shimasu'. It carries a sense of earnest desire or request and could be translated as 'I request this of you'. 

It's a notch up from 'kudasai' in terms of formality, giving your request an extra layer of respectfulness.

Diving into the Formalities of 'Onegai Shimasu'

'Onegai shimasu' is generally used when making a formal request or pleading for a favor. It's derived from 'negau', which means 'to wish' or 'to request'. 

You can use it when asking for something that the other person doesn't necessarily have at the moment. For example, if you're asking a friend to do you a future favor, you might say 'onegai shimasu'.

Instances Where 'Onegai Shimasu' is Most Apt

'Onegai shimasu' is ideal for business settings or when you're interacting with someone in a higher social position. It's a way to show that you respect their authority or position. 

For example, if you're asking your boss for some time off, you might say 'yasumi o onegai shimasu' ('I request time off, please'). It's all about adding that extra layer of respect!

'Douzo' (どうぞ): Giving a Favor

please visit us again in japanese

Shifting gears, we have 'douzo' – a term that's not just about asking, but also about giving! In Japanese, 'douzo' is an incredibly gracious way to say 'please', but it's more than that. 

It's often used when offering something to someone else, whether it's a seat on the train, a slice of cake at a party, or the last piece of sushi on the plate.

Understanding the Grace of 'Douzo'

The beauty of 'douzo' lies in its gentle tone and sense of courtesy. It's like saying 'please, go ahead' or 'please, be my guest'. It carries a feeling of warmth and hospitality, making the other person feel welcomed and respected.

The Right Time and Place for 'Douzo'

'Douzo' is a versatile term that fits equally well in casual and formal situations. It's perfect when you're hosting a dinner party and offering the first dish to your guests, or when you're holding the door open for a stranger. In a nutshell, 'douzo' is the Japanese equivalent of extending your hand in generosity and politeness. 

So, the next time you're in a position to offer something, remember to do it with a gracious 'douzo'!

'Chodai' (頂戴): Receiving Something

Another important phrase to know is 'chodai', which means 'please give me' or 'receive'. It's usually used when asking someone for something, whether it's a favor or an object. 

Understanding the Meaning of 'Chodai'

At first glance, 'chodai' might seem like an ordinary request, but it's actually much more than that. By saying 'chodai', you're asking someone to take the time and effort to give you something. It conveys a sense of respect and appreciation for the person offering their help – something that's especially important in Japanese culture. 

What 'Chodai' is Used For?

Much like 'douzo', 'chodai' is a versatile phrase that can be used in both formal and informal situations. It's perfect when asking a colleague for advice or asking your friend to lend you something. 

In any case, 'chodai' is the perfect way to show your appreciation when requesting something from someone else! 

Common Phrases Incorporating 'Please'

Incorporating 'please' in your sentences is an excellent way to politely request something. The Japanese language is filled with phrases that reflect this concept. 

How to Ask for Something Politely

When asking for something, the use of 'please' softens the request and shows respect. In Japanese, you can use 'kudasai' (ください) after the object you're asking for. For instance, if you're asking for water, you'd say 'mizu o kudasai', which translates to 'water, please'.

Examples of Daily Conversations with 'Please'

Let's see some daily life examples of using 'please' in conversations:

  • 'Shashin o toru koto ga dekimasu ka, kudasai?' - 'Can I take a photo, please?'
  • 'Menyū, onegaishimasu.' - 'The menu, please.'
  • 'Kōhī o kudasai.' - 'Coffee, please.'

Remember, using 'please' in your conversations is a simple but effective way to show politeness and respect - especially important in Japanese culture.

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please visit us again in japanese

How to Say Please in Japanese: Making Polite Requests and Favors

Politeness is an essential aspect of Japanese culture, and knowing how to say “please” in Japanese is crucial when making requests or asking for favors. In this blog post, we will explore various ways to say “please” in Japanese, along with the cultural nuances associated with polite language usage.

ください (Kudasai)

The most common and versatile word for “please” in Japanese is “ください” (Kudasai). This word is used when making a direct request for something or asking someone to do something for you. It is considered polite and respectful and can be used in various situations, such as ordering food, requesting assistance, or asking for information.

お願いします (Onegaishimasu)

Another important phrase to express politeness and make requests is “お願いします” (Onegaishimasu). This phrase is a polite way to ask for something and can be used in formal and informal settings. It is commonly used in daily interactions and carries a sense of politeness, humility, and respect. It can be used on its own or in conjunction with other phrases to make polite requests.

お願いがあります (Onegai ga arimasu)

To express a more formal or specific request, you can use the phrase “お願いがあります” (Onegai ga arimasu), which means “I have a request.” This phrase is often used in professional settings or when making a more serious or important request. It shows a higher level of politeness and formality in the language.

Other Polite Expressions

In addition to the basic “please” phrases, there are other expressions used to make polite requests or favors:

  • お手数をおかけします (Otesū wo okake shimasu) : This phrase is used to acknowledge that the request may cause inconvenience or trouble to the other person. It expresses gratitude and apologizes for any inconvenience caused.
  • お手伝いいただけますか (O-tetsudai itadakemasu ka): This expression means “Can you help me?” and is used when seeking assistance or asking someone to lend a hand.
  • お願いしたいことがあります (Onegai shitai koto ga arimasu): This phrase conveys the idea of having something you would like to request or ask for.

Politeness and respect are highly valued in Japanese culture, and knowing how to say “please” in Japanese is essential for effective communication. Whether using “ください” (Kudasai), “お願いします” (Onegaishimasu), or other polite expressions, using appropriate language when making requests or asking for favors demonstrates your understanding and appreciation of Japanese cultural norms. By incorporating these phrases into your everyday interactions, you can navigate social situations with grace and respect.

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I'm Krisada, the creator of JLPT TUTOR. I created this site to share the path of my Japanese learning That I achieved my JLPT N1. You may struggle with Kanji , Grammar , Listening, reading and fail again and again. I know how you feel when you see "Not Pass" I want to share what I learnt in this past through this website. Hope you enjoy

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Different ways to express “Again” in Japanese

In this post I’d like to go over a few days to express the idea of “again” in Japanese language, keeping in mind the particular nuance of each.

1) “また” is a simple way to say “again”, and is pretty well known by even beginning Japanese learners due to some common expressions it is used in:

  • またね   (see you again)
  • また明日 (see you tomorrow)
  • また今度 (see you later)

These are sometimes prefixed by “じゃ” which translates to something like “Well…”.

You can use また in sentences to mean “again”, but sometimes this word can have a negative connotation and isn’t particularly polite.

  • You did it again?

また or または can also be used to mean “also” in more formal Japanese.

2) If you’re speaking polite Japanese or you want to use a slightly more formal expression, you can say “改めて” (あらためて)  which comes from the verb 改める, meaning “to renew or change”.

  • 改めて自己紹介をします。
  • I’ll introduce myself again.

3) “もう一回” literally means “one more time” and can be used in the same sense as “again”. This word doesn’t have the rough connotation of また and is a little safer for general use.

  • もう一回言ってください。
  • Say that again please.
  • 頭からもう一回練習しようね。
  • Let’s practice once more from the beginning.

You can replace もう一回 with もう一度 without any change in meaning.

4) You can also express the idea of “again” with the suffix “〜直す” (〜なおす). You simply add this word after the pre-masu form (i.e. “ね” for the verb “ねる”).

” 直す” literally means “to fix”, and accordingly this grammatical construction has the connotation of fixing something. For beginner students I would recommend just sticking to some of the more common forms and eventually experimenting with this suffix on other words once you get comfortable hearing it.

  • 寝直す  (go back to sleep)
  • やり直す    (redo)
  • 言い直す    (restate, correct)
  • 考え直す    (rethink)
  • 読み直す    (read again, re-read)

One mistake I’ve made is to say something like the following:

  • 映画をもう一回見直したい。
  • I’d like to watch this movie once more.   [incorrect]

The Japanese sentence isn’t technically incorrect but the English translation is. A better translation would be:

  • I’d like to  re watch this movie once more.

Now you can see this implies watching the movie at least for a 3rd time, which is not my intention. I should have said one of these phrases:

  • 映画をもう一回みたい。

5) 再, pronounced さい,  is a prefix which means ‘again’. However I have only seen it used with a few words, for example:

  • 再挑戦 – challenge again
  • 再確認 – reverify (“check again”)
  • 再利用 – recycle (“use again”)

6) If you want to use “again” in a negative sense, as in “I’ll never ~ again”, you can use this pattern:

  • もう + [verb in negative tense]

For example,

  • 僕はもう船に乗らない。
  • I’ll never ride a boat again.

You can add 二度と after もう if you want to make a stronger statement.

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6 thoughts on “ Different ways to express “Again” in Japanese ”

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For #5, sometimes I see that Kanji used not as a prefix, but just as a word (再び / futatabi) to mean again. Like, the example I saw was 再び日本に行った meaning “I went to Japan again.” But I’ve only really ever seen it used in sentences with 行く.

Do you know if it is uncommon to use 再び for “again”?

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I think the word 再び is not used that commonly, and when it is, it has a ‘literary’ connotation (文語). I did a quick search and found a post that confirms that hunch:

https://hinative.com/ja/questions/1095645

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Thank you, this was quite helpful! How would I say something like “I’m sick again”, with emphasis on again? また病気になってしまった???

Yes, what you said is a good way to express it. You could also abbreviate as また病気になっちゃった.

If you were trying to express frustration over someone else being sick you could say ”また病気かよ”.

The word 再発 means “reoccurrence” of a certain medical condition, you might be able to use this word to in some cases.

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In 5) you have incorrect translation: 再確認 – recycle

Thank you for the article. Your blog is very inspiring.

Thanks for pointing that out. I fixed it.

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“Please” in Japanese – A way to show politeness

Today, we’re going to find out how to say “please” in Japanese. And while it may sound like a simple venture, there are quite a few ways to say “please” in Japanese in different situations (unlike English).

A girl with her hands clasped together in a pleading gesture

Japanese culture is all about respect, politeness, and formalities. That is why it’s something that every learner needs not only to improve their communication skills but also to be a nice person in general!

So grab your helmets and get ready for this academic ride!

  • 1 Saying “please” in Japanese – Sentence structure
  • 2.1.1 A note on お願いします (onegaishimasu)
  • 2.2 どうぞ (douzo)
  • 3.1 ください (kudasai)
  • 3.2 ちょうだい (choudai|頂戴)
  • 3.3 プリーズ (puriizu)
  • 4 A final note on saying “please” in Japanese

Saying “please” in Japanese – Sentence structure

A quick and easy grammar note worth clarifying before moving on any further is about Japanese sentence structure . When making polite requests in Japanese, “please” always comes at the very end of the request! So, whereas in English, you may say, “please pass the salt, ” this doesn’t work in Japanese.

Instead, you’d have to use the conjugation te form with kudasai, like しおをとってください (shio wo totte kudasai | 塩を取ってください), which is literally “pass me the salt, please. ”

More on ください (kudasai) in just a moment. For now and just keep in mind that these “please” words always come at the end of a request!

How to say “please” in Japanese formally

Before anything else, let us remind you that context is king in Japanese! When questioning context, one of the most important factors to consider is how respectful or polite you should be with whomever you’re engaging.

As a general rule, it’s always better to be more respectful when conversing with someone if you’re ever in doubt about where you stand, and for that reason, we’ll learn Japanese formal guidelines for saying “please” first and foremost!

おねがいします (onegaishimasu | お願いします)

Here is the most polite way to say “please” in Japanese, and it’s something you’ll encounter all the time in Japan – during train announcements, written on official notices, when checking out at the clothing store, asking for something in a restaurant, you name it.

It’s best to use this expression in most situations when talking with strangers, clerks, doctors, a taxi driver, etc. Here are some examples of when you can use this expression.

そのちいさいビールをおねがいします(sono chiisai biiru wo onegaishimasu | その小さいビールをお願いします)

That small beer, please.

This phrase is also used when requesting a service you cannot fulfill yourself, be it an abstract object or something more concrete

せんだいえきまでおねがいします (sendai eki made onegaishimasu | 仙台駅までお願いします)

Please (take me) to Sendai Station.

ごりかいをおねがいします(gorikai wo onegaishimasu | ご理解をお願いします)

We ask for your patience (please).

On the other hand, you can use this phrase on its own if the request has already been stated, is otherwise implied, or is confirmed.

Masako: そしてすいようびまでおみせをしめてあげる?(soshite suiyoubi made omise wo shimeteageru?|そして水曜日までお店を占めてあげる?)

So then, I should keep the store closed for you until Wednesday?

Yuki:お願いします (onegaishimasu)

(Yes) Please!

A note on お願いします (onegaishimasu)

This expression is used to lower oneself and honor those to who you are speaking. As such, this phrase can be thought of as a spoken bow in Japanese culture. Even before competitive matches or sports, お願いします (onegaishimasu) is spoken to the opposition before the games begin.

Originally, this expression comes from ねがう (negau|願う), a verb meaning “to hope.” In fact, the noun form of this verb is ねがい (negai|願い) which is a hope or a wish, and is a common Japanese word worth remembering!

どうぞ (douzo)

This phrase for please in Japanese is used when you want someone to accept something, as in “please go ahead.” It’s either used when offering an actual object, like a cookie, or when offering a gesture, like when allowing someone to pass through a door before you.

こちらへどうぞ (kochira e douzo)

This way, please.

おさけをどうぞ (osake wo douzo|お酒をどうぞ)

Here is your sake (and please enjoy) *this might be said after a waiter delivers your glass of sake

Also, どうぞ (douzo) is one of the few please phrases in Japanese that appears at the beginning of a sentence at times. It’s also paired with other please words, as it adds an emphatic quality to a suggestion or request whenever used

どうぞおはいりください (douzo ohairi kudasai|どうぞお入りください)

Please come in. *used when politely being prompted to enter a room

どうぞよろしくおねがいします(douzo yoroshiku onegaishimasu|どうぞよろしくお願いします)

Nice to meet you. *one of the early important phases you learn as a Japanese student. It translates to something like “please take care.”

We’ve given this a spot in the formal list because that’s rightfully where it belongs, but this expression is also used in the same way between close acquaintances and relatives.

Yuki: これのんでいい?(kore nonde ii?|これ飲んでいい?)

Can I drink this?

Masako: うん、どうぞ (un, douzo)

Yeah, go ahead.

How to say “please” in Japanese informally

Of course, you wouldn’t, nor should you be, overly formal and respectful when speaking with friends and family in Japan. In fact, formalities only create separation and distance between people (especially in Japan), so being too formal with someone you’re supposed to be close with may actually be offensive!

That’s why it’s important to know how to communicate with your best folks just like everyone else does, with a bit of rudeness and a heaping of love.

We have an article on Japanese honorifics if you’d like to dig deeper into formalities. Going back, here are the informal ways to say “please” in Japanese.

ください (kudasai)

This is the informal equivalent of お願いします (onegaishimasu), and while it’s usually used in more formal situations, typically for set expressions, it is also used with close friends and family members. It’s more like a direct request to give or do something for you, which is why it can be rude when used improperly. Here are some example sentences.

ごちゅういください (gochuui kudasai|ご注意ください)

Please be careful.

もういちどください (mouichido kudasai|もう一度ください)

(Say it) One more time, please.

じぶんのごはんをもってきてください (jibun no gohan wo mottekite kudasai | 自分のご飯を持ってきてください)

Please bring your own lunch.

While it’s not the most polite way to make requests in Japanese, it’s fine to use this term with those who share the same or are at a lower status/rank/age as you do, or even when ordering something as a customer (which makes you important by default).

It’s definitely the most common way to say “please” in Japanese!

ちょうだい (choudai|頂戴)

Here’s a super casual Japanese expression for “please.” It can be used by both genders but carries more of a feminine essence and is used more by women.

It’s something often heard by mothers requesting their children to do something.

みせてちょうだい (misete choudai|見せて頂戴)

It’s a popular way to ask a friend to try some of their food or drink.

ちょっとちょうだい (chotto choudai?|ちょっと頂戴?)

Can I try it?/Can I have a bit?

Lastly, couples use this word between themselves as a cute and short way to ask for something.

しょくパンちょうだい (shokupan choudai|食パン頂戴)

Please pass me the shokupan.

プリーズ (puriizu)

As you may have guessed, this is simply the Japanese rendition of the English word “please,” which makes it pretty easy to remember. It’s not very often said in Japan unless for play or when a Japanese native is trying to communicate with someone who cannot speak Japanese.

Rightfully, it’s more of a neutral expression as a foreign word, having yet to be distinguished on a larger contextual scale, but it can be considered casual nonetheless.

A final note on saying “please” in Japanese

The phrases for please covered in this article are universal, but by no means are they exclusive or most popular in all parts of Japan. Actually, Japanese culture can get pretty diverse depending on the region/province, so naturally, there would be a difference in communication norms and social expectations too.

Remember that as you immerse yourself in Japan’s culture (especially if you are in the actual country), stay open-minded and receptive to the vast pool of individuality you are likely to discover on your journey – especially concerning patterns of speaking. Never stop learning Japanese!

がんばってください (ganbatte kudasai)! ^^

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please visit us again in japanese

How To Say “Again” In Japanese

There are a lot of ways that you can say “again” in Japanese and we are going to go over five of them in today’s post along with some explanations and examples.

My intention is that you will know how to say again in Japanese once you’re done reading, or at the very least be able to understand it when you encounter it in native materials.

If at any time something doesn’t make sense, or if you just have a question that you want to ask, be sure to leave me a comment at the bottom and I will respond to it as best I can.

With all of that out of the way, let’s hope right in to today’s post!

1. 又 (mata)

The first word that I wanted to go over is 又. That is the kanji spelling for it, which does get used every once in a while, but it’s much more common to see it written in hiragana as また (mata).

Perhaps the most common phrase that this word appears in is the following:

  • mata ashita!
  • See you tomorrow!

This phrase is literally saying “again tomorrow” in Japanese, but really, it is a standard phrase that it used to say goodbye to someone and also that you will meet them the following day.

This is a great one to use with friends, classmates, and even close co-workers when you are parting ways with them and you know that you will encounter them within the next 24 hours.

Another good phrase that you can use is when you want to ask someone “again?” because they are doing something a lot and your kind of surprised.

  • (you’re doing that) Again?

For example, if you have a friend that is rewatching a YouTube video that you know they’ve already seen ten times, then this is a good phrase to use.

2. 改めて (aratamete)

The word 改めて also means “again” in Japanese, but it’s slightly different from the first word that we covered.

This new word has more of a “once again” feeling to it and get’s used in different situations than また typically would.

  • 改めて憂鬱になっていた。
  • aratamete yuu’utsu ni natte ita.
  • Once again, I became depressed.

Generally speaking this word can be used if there was a state or situation that had occurred once in the past and was resolved, but then it occured again!

I tend to see this word more often in novels than anywhere else.

3. 再び (futatabi)

For this next word, a pretty good way to understand it is as the phrase “a second time” which of course is just a different way of saying again in English.

Although it does kind of have different connotations since it indicates that whatever is happening has only occurred once before in the past.

Or it indicates that the last time the action was performed was a long time ago, like a decade or many years.

  • futatabi kokyou no machi o mita.
  • He saw his home town again.

( hinative.com )

You might recognize this kanji from section three above.

That would make sense due to its meaning, which I’ve highlighted below from jisho.org :

please visit us again in japanese

But this time we are going to look at it from a bit of a different perspective.

Instead of looking at it by itself like we did earlier, we are going to look at this kanji when it is used as a prefix .

In other words, the kanji 再 often gets attached to other kanji in order to create a new word that has that “re” meaning, or the meaning of something happening a second time.

For example, the word 再建 (saiken) means “rebuilding” or “reconstruction” when translated into English.

The word 再会 (saikai) means “meeting again” or we could even say a “reunion.”

What’s kind of interesting is the word 再三 (saisan) which combines our highlighted kanji with the kanji for the number three. The meaning of it is “again and again; repeatedly” which you can kind of see when you think of it as “again-three times.”

So the thing to take away from this section is that when you see the kanji 再 combined with any other kanji, you can start to think of a repetition of the other kanji and that might help you figure out its meaning.

5. もう一度 (mou ichi do)

This next phrase is composed of several parts.

The first part is the word もう (mou) which has several meanings, but two of the more applicable ones in this lesson are “again; another.”

Then we have 一 (ichi) which means “one” and 度 (do) which is a counter for occurrences.

So taken in all together, the phrase もう一度 means “one more time” in Japanese.

For example, if you were talking to your girlfriend or boyfriend over the phone whom you hadn’t seen in several weeks, then you might want to tell them that you miss them and want to see them.

  • mou ichi do aitai!
  • I want to see you again!

Another situation where this phrase can be useful is when you’re speaking Japanese to a native and they say something that you didn’t understand.

You can ask them politely to repeat what they said so that you can try to understand it the second time they say it.

  • もう一度言ってください。
  • mou ichi do itte kudasai.
  • Please say that again.

This phrase is a good one to use when ever you are talking about a verb happening a second time, or even a third time.

No More Words!

Alright, so that was quite a few different words in Japanese for just one English word!

I think the thing to keep in mind is that there are a lot of different ways that “again” can be expressed in Japanese and it kind of depends on the situation.

Hopefully this article has helped you become familiar with them, so that when you’re reading manga or a novel and you come across it you will know what it means.

Then once you’ve seen enough examples of them, you should start to get a feel for when you can use them yourself.

Further Resources for Learning Japanese:

#1 See How I Learn Japanese

#2 Save 35% Off LingQ Premium

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please visit us again in japanese

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Table of Contents

Particle + 行く・来る, て form + 行く・来る, conjugations, 〜に行く/来る for "to go/come to do something", general action, accompaniment, 〜て来る for going and coming back, 〜て来る for emphasizing pushy actions, 〜ていく and 〜てくる for gradual processes.

行く (いく・ゆく) and 来る (くる) are Japanese words for "to go" and "to come." 1

The way you use 行く and 来る are mostly the same as their English counterparts. For example, imagine you and your friend are running to the platform to catch a train. To say "the train will come soon," you use 来る:

  • 電車 ( でんしゃ ) 、もうすぐ 来る よ。
  • The train will come soon.

But when you and your friend finally get to the platform, the train has already left. To say "the train is gone ," you use 行く:

  • 電車、 行っちゃった ね。
  • The train's gone , huh?

As this example shows, when the speaker and listener share the same perspective about the movement, Japanese works similarly to English. On the other hand, you have to be careful when their perspectives differ!

For example, say your friend is waiting for you to get ready to go out. They shout out, "Hurry up, it's time to go!" When you respond in English, you'll probably say something like "Hold on, I'm coming now!" In Japanese, however, you can't use 来る in this situation.

  • ちょっと 待 ( ま ) って!今 [⭕ 行く・❌ 来る] よ!
  • Hold on, I'm coming now! ( Literally : I'm going now!)

This is because in Japanese, you use 来る when the movement is toward your current location and 行く when it's away from your current location. Here, you're talking about your own movement, which will take you away from where you currently are, so you have to use 行く instead of 来る.

On the other hand, "to come" in English can refer to movements shared between the speaker and listener in both directions. But to use "go" in English in the above scenario would sound a little strange, almost like you're going to a different, unrelated place (instead of to where your friend is waiting for you), or like you're about to leave without your friend. That's the most significant difference between English and Japanese, so just try to remember it when selecting 行く or 来る!

On this page, you'll learn how 行く and 来る can be used with other words or in different forms to acquire additional meanings — let's go !

Patterns of Use

Like all main verbs in Japanese, 行く and 来る generally go at the end of a sentence or clause.

行く and 来る are often used with the particle に as it can mark the location where someone is going or coming to.

  • 学校 に [行く・来る]
  • go/come to school

In this use, you can replace に with the particle へ or まで , as in 学校 へ 行く or 学校 まで 来る. Here, へ sounds more formal while まで emphasizes it's the endpoint of a movement, which can add the nuance of "all the way to…" The particle に can also follow a verbal noun, as in 勉強 ( べんきょう ) に, or a verb in its stem form, as in 勉強しに or 学 ( まな ) びに, to explain why you're going or coming.

  • 勉強(し) に [行く・来る]
  • go/come to study
  • 学び に [行く・来る]
  • go/come to learn

To specify the way you come or go somewhere, you can use the particle で , as in バスで (by bus), タクシーで (by taxi), 電車で (by train), or 徒歩で (on foot).

  • バスで [行く・来る]
  • go/come somewhere by bus

When different particles mark multiple parts, you can switch around the positions.

  • 学校にバスで [行く・来る] バスで学校に [行く・来る]
  • go/come to school by bus

行く and 来る can attach to another verb in its て form . In this pattern, 行く and 来る become grammatical features and their literal meanings are weakened. Hence, they are commonly written in kana, as in 〜ていく/くる .

  • 歩いて [いく・くる]
  • go/come somewhere on foot

You can also place other elements before the two combined verbs, or even in between them!

  • 学校に歩いて [いく・くる] 歩いて学校に [いく・くる]
  • go/come to school on foot

The verb 行く is a godan verb and the verb 来る is an irregular verb , so they conjugate differently. Here are some basic conjugations of the two verbs:

The formal versions are exactly the same for both 行く and 来る. The respectful ways of saying 行く and 来る are いらっしゃる or おいでになる, while the humble way of saying 行く and 来る is 参 ( まい ) る. These words are used in formal situations.

Like "go see" or "come visit" in English, 行く and 来る can be used with other verbs to show the purpose of the movement.

In this case, 行く and 来る follow the stem form of the purpose verb, and are marked by the particle に .

For example, say you are going to a movie theater to see My Neighbor Totoro . In English, you'll "go see" it. In Japanese, you'll 見に行く.

  • 映画館 ( えいがかん ) に『となりのトトロ』を見に行く。
  • I'm going to the movie theater to see My Neighbor Totoro .

Let's take a look at another situation. Imagine one of your friends is moving somewhere far away and says, "Come visit me someday!" In this situation, she'll use 会う (to see/meet someone) with に and 来る and say:

  • Come visit me someday!

Similarly, "go buy coffee" is コーヒーを買いに行く and "come eat sushi" is 寿司 ( すし ) を食べに来る. You can make many sentences with this pattern!

〜て行く/来る for Supplementing Meaning

行く and 来る can also follow another verb in its て form . Here they work as helping verbs, a.k.a. auxiliary verbs, which supplement the main verb. In this use, 行く and 来る are commonly written in kana, as in 〜ていく/くる, because they become a grammatical feature and their literal meanings are weakened.

What nuance いく and くる supplement can change depending on the main verb. This section will look at how they work with different types of verbs!

When いく and くる follow a general action, such as 買う (buy) or 食べる (eat), it means the subject carries out the main action first and then goes or comes somewhere:

  • 買って [いく・くる]
  • buy, and then go/come
  • 食べて [いく・くる]
  • eat, and then go/come

For example, imagine you are going to visit your friend's place. If you are getting some donuts for the occasion, you can tell your friend:

  • ドーナツを買っ ていく よ!
  • I'll get some donuts for you/us. ( Literally : I'll buy some donuts and then go there.)

Here, it doesn't matter if you buy them on the way there or ahead of time. It simply means you'll purchase the donuts sometime before getting there.

If the donuts are a surprise gift, you might not tell your friend until after you get to their house. In this case, you'll change いく to くる since you've already bought the donuts and arrived at your friend's house.

  • ドーナツを買っ てきた よ!
  • I got some donuts for you/us. ( Literally : I bought some donuts and then came here.)

Similarly, if you are going somewhere after eating lunch, you can say 昼ごはんを食べていく (I'll eat lunch and then go there). And after you arrive at your destination, you can say 昼ごはんを食べてきた (I ate lunch and then came here). It's pretty straightforward, right?

Sometimes, these expressions can be used more situationally, though. Say you arrive at your friend's house, for example, and they ask if you've already had lunch. A simple answer like うん、食べた (yes, I ate) would sound a bit direct, so it's more common to add another element like くる:

  • Friend: お昼ごはん、もう食べた? You: あ、食べ てきた 。
  • Friend: Have you had lunch yet? You: Ah, I have. ( Literally : Ah, I ate and then came here.)

Let's take a look at one more example. Imagine after you and your friend have hung out for a while, your friend's mother comes home. Everyone says hello and chats for a bit, and then your friend's mother asks you a question:

  • 夕飯、食べ ていく ?
  • Would you like to have supper here? ( Literally : Are you going to eat supper and then go?)

If you look at the literal meaning, it may seem a strange way of asking the question. However, by adding 行く, your friend's mother can show she is aware that you have to leave at some point. It's a small additional nuance, but now the question can ask if you are willing to eat dinner while you are still at their place . 2

Next, we'll check out the verbs that indicate you have something or someone with you, such as 持 ( も ) つ (to have/carry something) and 連 ( つ ) れる (to accompany someone).

When いく or くる follows this type of word, the meaning is pretty straightforward. It just indicates that you go or come somewhere with the thing or person referenced. Hence, 持っていく and 連れていく mean "to take" and 持ってくる and 連れてくる mean "to bring" something or someone respectively.

  • 学校に宿題を持って [いく・くる] のを忘れた。
  • I forgot to take/bring my homework to school.
  • 学校にネコを連れて [いった・きた] の!?
  • Did you take/bring a cat to school!?

This use also applies to clothes-related verbs, such as 着 ( き ) る ("to wear" for general items of clothing) or はく ("to wear" for bottoms, including shoes and socks). By adding 行く or 来る to those verbs, you can specify what clothes you have on when you go/come somewhere.

  • パーティーに赤いドレスを着て [いく・くる]
  • go/come to a party in a red dress
  • ハイキングにパンプスをはいて [いく・くる]
  • go/come to the hike wearing pumps

Often, 行く and 来る also follow movement verbs, such as 歩く (to walk), 走る (to run), 泳 ( およ ) ぐ (to swim), and 飛 ( と ) ぶ (to fly).

For example, let's say you are off to the office on foot. In English, you can say "I will walk to the office," but it's not very natural to say 会社に歩く in Japanese. This is because the Japanese verb 歩く (to walk) just describes the physical act of walking without a directional meaning.

To complement the meaning, you'll need an additional word that carries the directional nuance. That word can be a particle or preposition, like まで (up to) or 向 ( む ) かって (toward), but it can also be a verb, like いく or くる.

In this situation, you are talking about movement away from your current departure point, so you can say 歩いていく:

  • I'm going to the office on foot.

If you are at or around the office and your focus shifts to the movement towards where you are, you switch it to 歩いてくる.

  • I came to the office on foot.

Similarly, if you are running to the office, you may 会社に走っていく/くる. If your office is on an island surrounded by a lake, you may 会社に泳いでいく/くる. And if you can fly like Anpanman, you may 会社に飛んでいく/くる.

There are also motion verbs that already carry a sense of direction, such as 入る (to go in), 出る (to go out), 帰 ( かえ ) る, and 戻 ( もど ) る (to return) (to return). 3 When いく or くる follows this type of verb, it clarifies the speaker's perspective and describes the movements more dynamically.

For example, if you see someone coming into or out of where you are, you'd typically use 入ってくる or 出ていく to describe the scene.

  • 先生が 教室 ( きょうしつ ) に入ってきた。
  • The teacher came into the classroom.
  • 先生が教室から出ていった。
  • The teacher went out of the classroom.

By adding いく or くる, you can show which side of the movement you are on and whether it's away from or toward you. It makes the sentence more dynamic than a simple statement of fact, like it's a scene of someone coming or going as viewed from your eye.

In other words, you don't add いく or くる if you just want to state a fact without involving your personal perspective. For example, picture a stakeout scene where you're a police officer reporting on the movements of your target. You see the culprit moving in and out of a classroom, for example, so you might say into your walky-talky:

  • 今、 犯人 ( はんにん ) が教室に入りました。
  • The culprit has entered the classroom.
  • 今、犯人が教室から出ました。
  • The culprit has left the classroom.

In this case, it's common to omit いく and くる. Without them, you don't implicate yourself in the scene. Your report to the other officers is just an objective statement about the culprit.

Let's take a look at another example. Say you've made a Japanese friend named Hanako in some country that isn't Japan, but now she has left for her home country. In this case, you can say:

  • 花子は日本に [戻った・帰った]。 花子は日本に [戻って・帰って] いった。
  • Hanako went back to Japan.

Here, the first sentence sounds like you are stating the fact that Hanako went back to Japan. The second sentence better reflects your personal perspective, like you are sending off Hanako while thinking about her going toward Japan. Due to the nuance いく adds, there's a lingering image of Hanako heading to her home country, even after she has disappeared from your sight.

Since いく conjures up a more descriptive image, as seen from your eyes, of Hanako going back to Japan, it might not work with future events that you haven't witnessed yet (unless you want to sound super poetic). To say something like "Hanako is going back to Japan in a month," it's more natural just to say:

  • 花子は 来月 ( らいげつ ) 日本に [帰る・戻る]。
  • Hanako will go back to Japan next month.

On the other hand, if you're a member of Hanako's family in Japan and talking about her return, you'll typically add くる regardless of whether it's in the future or past. For people on the "arrival" end of the movement, it's natural to visualize her coming back toward them, and it doesn't carry any poetic tone, even if it's about a future event.

  • 花子は来月日本に [帰って・戻って] くる。
  • Hanako will come back to Japan next month.
  • 花子は日本に [帰って・戻って] きた。
  • Hanako came back to Japan.

Beyond The Basics

In the earlier section , you learned 食べてくる means "eat, and then come." You can also use this phrase when you are at home and just about to go eat somewhere. For example, imagine you are off to lunch with your friends and tell your family about it. In this case, you'd say:

  • 友達 ( ともだち ) とランチ食べてくる。
  • I'm going out for lunch with my friends (and coming back).

You are at the departure point, and the sentence is about your movement away from that point. So why use くる instead of いく here?

It's because this sort of expression is often used when you're talking to someone who'll be staying behind while you're away. When you leave the house, you expect to return later, right? So to the family members who won't be joining you, you're still doing the "eat, and then come" that 食べてくる suggests. It's a nice gesture to inform the involved people what's going on from their perspective . Since the meaning of くる is a bit stretched in this use, it's typically written in kana.

Let's continue with the same scenario. When you leave the house, you may tell your family members:

  • I'm going (and coming back).

This is a greeting phrase for when you are going out. It's a combination of 行く and くる, so it implies you "will go out but will come back later." In the old days, people risked their lives to travel, so saying 行ってきます was like making a vow that they would return. 4

You'll use this expression not only when you go out somewhere but also when you step out for a moment. For example, say you are now at a restaurant with some friends. However, one friend is late and hasn't messaged anyone. You are worried, so you say:

  • どうしたのかな? ちょっと 電話 ( でんわ ) してくるよ。
  • I wonder what happened. I'm going to go out and call him (and come back).

In this case, 〜てくる adds the nuance of "brb" (be right back). It indicates that you'll leave the table to make a phone call and will be back afterward. 5

When someone offers unsolicited or unwelcome action, you can add 〜てくる to express its pushiness. For example, imagine some backseat driver-type keeps lecturing you about the way you study Japanese. Here, you may complain about it to someone else, like:

  • 聞 ( き ) いてもないのに 色々 ( いろいろ ) 教 ( おし ) えてくるんだよね。
  • They lecture me on things I don't even ask about.

In this example, くる indicates that the act of 教える (to lecture/teach) directly comes towards you. It expresses the pushiness of the officious action.

What if you want to show your gratitude towards someone's act? In that case, you can use 〜てくれる or 〜てもらう instead.

  • いつも色々教えて [くれる・もらう] んだよね。
  • They always teach me a lot.

Here, 〜てくれる is a humble way of saying someone is doing something for you. 〜てもらう is basically the same, but it's often suited for when the favor is done upon your request.

It may feel a bit strange for English speakers, but you use the ている form of 行く when someone has gone somewhere.

For example, let's say you have a daughter who is studying in New York. If someone asks you where your daughter is, you will describe the situation by using 行っている (or its casual form 行ってる), like:

  • うちの 娘 ( むすめ ) はニューヨークに 留学 ( りゅうがく ) に行ってるんです。
  • My daughter has gone to New York to study.

This is because a verb in the ている form describes an ongoing situation that began in the past. Think of it like a state or condition. The moment she left for New York she entered the "going to New York" state, and she'll remain in that ニューヨークに行っている condition until she comes back.

You can use 行っている for more day-to-day outings as well. For example, imagine someone calls your home phone and asks for your mom. To say she is out for shopping, it will be:

  • 母 ( はは ) は今、 買 ( か ) い 物 ( もの ) に行っています。
  • Mom is out shopping now.

When 来る is in its ている form , you can express that you are currently visiting somewhere. For example, if you want to say you are visiting New York, you can say:

  • 今ニューヨークに来ているんです。
  • I'm in New York now.

Again, a verb in the ている form describes an ongoing situation that began in the past. When you arrive in New York, you enter a "visiting New York" or "having come to New York" condition. That condition will last as long as your stay does, so until you leave you can say you're 来ている in New York.

To learn more about how the ている form works in general, check out its dedicated page!

〜ていく and 〜てくる can also express a gradual process in time. Here, 〜ていく focuses on the initial point of the process, while 〜てくる focuses on the endpoint.

For example, if you are watching instructional videos in Japanese, the instructor may say something like:

  • 一緒 ( いっしょ ) に 頑張 ( がんば ) っていきましょう。
  • Let's work on this together!

Here, 〜ていく implies a gradual process you are going to begin or continue. When it follows 一緒に頑張る (to work together), the teacher can express that you are standing at the start or middle of a learning journey, and they expect to continue working together with you.

The ending ましょう is a polite ます form with the verb suffix 〜よう . It politely proposes that the learners keep working together too.

After months of lessons, let's say you've mastered whatever you were learning. You feel you couldn't have made it to that point without the friends who had worked with you. In this situation, you may use 〜てくる and say:

  • 一緒に頑張ってきた 仲間 ( なかま ) のおかげです。
  • It's thanks to my friends who have worked hard with me.

Again, 〜てくる indicates the endpoint of a gradual process. In this example, it shows you and your friends had worked hard together, but now you are at the endpoint or at least some milestone from which you can look back at your past efforts.

To learn more about this use of 〜ていく and 〜てくる, check out its dedicated page .

行く can be read either いく or ゆく. However, いく is more commonly used in modern Japanese, and ゆく is generally used in a poetic context.  ↩

The expression 食べていく can also mean "to make a living," or more precisely "to make enough money to buy food to survive." You can use this expression in a sentence like この 業界 ( ぎょうかい ) で食べていくのは 難 ( むずか ) しい。 (It's difficult to make a living in this industry.)  ↩

While 帰る and 戻る both mean "to return," there is a difference in nuance between the two. 帰る simply refers to returning to a place one considers to be a base or headquarters, like one's home, as in 家 ( いえ ) に帰る (to return home). In contrast, 戻る indicates returning to some place or state where one was previously. So while 戻る can also be used as "returning to a location" like 家に戻る (to return to the home), it can be used for "returning to a state" such as カエルは 王子 ( おうじ ) の 姿 ( すがた ) に戻った (the frog returned to the appearance of a prince).  ↩

To answer 行ってきます, people who will be staying would normally say 行ってらっしゃい. Although it's just a greeting phrase nowadays, the phrase is made up of 行く (go) and いらっしゃい (welcome), and it originally meant "go, but please come back safely."  ↩

Talking on the phone at a table is considered bad manners in Japan, especially in a fancy restaurant.  ↩

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How to say “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for inviting me” in Japanese

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In a culture of valuing hospitality, it’s important to know how to express gratitude whether you are the host or the guest. Learn how to say “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for inviting me” in Japanese for both formal and casual situations.

Table of Contents

  • The importance of expressing “Thank you for coming” & “Thank you for inviting me”

The casual way to say “Thank you for coming” in Japanese

The formal way to say “thank you for coming” in japanese, the casual way to say “thank you for inviting me” in japanese, the formal way to say “thank you for inviting me” in japanese, other ways to say “thank you” in japanese, the culture of omotenashi.

In Japan, the act of being hospitable is mirrored in おもてなし or omotenashi - the core of hospitality in Japanese culture. It is quite known that the Japanese are committed to providing wholehearted services and entertainment in a gracious and courteous manner. This attitude of devotedly looking after guests and visitors focuses on rendering services with care rather than just merely going through what is expected of being hospitable is the root of omotenashi, and both Japanese nationals and tourists enjoy being treated in this way when on the receiving end of services.

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Sen no Rikyu , the respectable Japanese tea ceremony master, is most often attributed to the origins of omotenashi. Sen no Rikyu believed that every guest's experience must be treated as an exemplary event, paying attention to every detail of the service to provide a memorable experience. Consequently, it is expected that both the host and the guest remain humble and grateful. 

For people coming from countries that have a tip system, it can be shocking that in most cases you will receive excellent service in Japan with no requirement to pay a tip. Good service is the standard, and in turn, bad or sometimes even simply mediocre service stands out as irregular and can really damage an establishment’s reputation. 

Thus, if you are working a job where you will be serving customers, a portion of your job training will include how to greet customers, practicing tone of voice, bowing, and so on. 

The Importance of Expressing “Thank you for coming” & “Thank you for inviting me”

One of the parts of omotenashi is to express gratitude verbally toward the guest for coming to the establishment or an event itself. This is especially important if the guest has traveled far. Of course, action will follow the words, but thanking the guests verbally upon their arrival is a key part of showing appreciation and hospitality. 

In turn, the guest will show gratitude towards the host who invited them. This is especially important if you have been invited to their home, as many people generally don’t casually invite people to their homes and instead meet outside like a cafe or restaurant, especially in bigger cities. Thus, there is a cultural tradition of bringing a gift when visiting a person’s home, as they’ve invited you into their personal space. 

Whether you’re the inviter or invitee, host or guest, it’s important to know what to say, so let’s take a look! 

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How to say “thank you for coming” in japanese.

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First off, most people know how to say “Thank you” in Japanese, but if you don’t know:

ありがとう (arigatou) is the most basic and casual way of saying thank you.

It can be made formal by saying ありがとうございます (arigatou gozaimasu).

ありがとうございました (arigatou gozaimashita) is the past tense form. 

It can also be made even more formal by saying どうも ありがとうございます (doumo arigatou gozaimasu) or どうも ありがとうございました (doumo arigatou gozaimashita).

Here’s a thorough article about how to say thank you in Japanese: 

Arigatou and more: How to Say Thank You in Japanese in All Types of Situations

The most basic and casual way to say “thank you for coming” is: 

来てくれてありがとう。 Kite kurete arigatou.

This is basically “Thank you / Thanks for coming”. You would use this with good friends and family, whether you’ve invited them to your house, a performance, an event, etc. or they accompanied you to something. 

( Note : If they accompanied you to something, you can also say 一緒に 来てくれてありがとう ( Issho ni kitekurete arigato) or “Thanks for coming with me .”)

You can use it in the following situations (You can add ございます “gozaimasu” at the end of these situations to make it a little more formal):

会いにきてくれてありがとう。 Aini kite kurete arigatou. Thank you for coming to see/meet me.

今日は来てくれてありがとう。 (Kyou wa kite kurete arigatou.) Thank you for coming today.

Even when referring to specific situations , we often leave off the noun for the occasion (party, recital, home) on the actual day of and just use 来てくれてありがとう (kite kurete arigatou). But when written or when referring to a past event  , please include it.

Thank you for coming to my birthday party . 誕生日会に 来てくれてありがとう。 Tanjoubikai ni kite kurete arigatou.

Thank you for coming to my performance/recital . 発表会に 来てくれてありがとう。  Happyoukai ni kite kurete arigatou.

Thank you for coming to my home . 家に 来てくれてありがとう。 Ie/Uchi ni kite kurete arigatou.

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For a more polite “thank you for coming”, we would say:

来ていただきありがとうございます。 Kite itadaki arigatou gozaimasu.

来てくださりありがとうございます。 Kite kudasari arigatou gozaimasu.

And in even more formal Japanese, “thank you for coming” used in all official events is said:

お越しいただきありがとうございます。 Okoshi itadaki arigatou gozaimasu.

お越しくださりありがとうございます。 Okoshi kudasari arigatou gozaimasu.

Note : The difference between itadaki and kudasari comes down to complex nuance, but both are used to ultimately mean the same thing. 

Specific situations

And in formal business Japanese, we have to change the form of the word “to come” entirely to suit the situation. You may hear and/or use these when shopping, at an event and when doing business.

Thank you for coming to this store . ご来店ありがとうございます。 Goraiten arigatou gozaimashita

Thank you for coming to this event/place . ご来場ありがとうございます。 Goraijou arigatou gozaimashita

Thank you for coming to my (company) office. ご来社いただきありがとうございます。 Goraisya itadaki arigatou gozaimashita

Thank you for visiting . ご来訪いただきありがとうございます。 Goraihou itadaki arigatou gozaimashita

Other Key Points

In formal Japanese, instead of saying 今日 (kyou) for today , we say 本日 (honjitsu) .

You may often hear the word わざわざ (waza waza) attached to the front - it means to go out of one’s way.

And for extra emphasis on your appreciation/formality, you can add 誠に (makoto ni - truly) in front of arigatou gozaimashita and say 誠にありがとうございます。(Makoto ni arigatou gozaimasu.)

ございます (gozaimasu) is used at the beginning and throughout the event, and ございました (gozaimashita) would be used at the very end of the event or after the event. 

How to say “Thank you for inviting me” in Japanese

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So what if you’re the guest?

Said to the host of the event/home:

呼んでくれてありがとう。 (Yonde kurete arigatou.) - usually used when you're invited to someone's home

招待してくれてありがとう。 (Shoutai shitekurete arigatou.) - usually used when invited to an event

Said to the person who invited you but they're not necessariy the host of the event/activity (eg. Your friend invites you to a concert or movie.) :

誘ってくれてありがとう。 (Sasotte kurete arigatou)

We use all three examples all the time. 

ご招待いただきありがとうございます。 Goshoutai itadaki arigatou gozaimasu.

お招きいただきありがとうございます。 Omaneki itadaki arigatou gozaimasu.

Similar notes about how to use these phrases:

Kudasari can be used intead of itadaki .

ございます (gozaimasu) is used at the beginning and throughout the event, and ございました (gozaimashita) would be used at the very end of the event or after the event.

When writing a thank you card or when referring to a past event, please include the word for the specific event/situation you are referring to at the beginning of the sentence. 

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We hope this article was helpful to understand how to say both "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for inviting me" in Japanese as well as the culture behind it. 

Take a look at some of our other articles covering different ways to say Thank you in Japanese: 

Saying Thank you in Japanese

How to say You're Welcome in Japanese

Thank you for listening in Japanese

Writing a thank you card in Japanese

No thank you in Japanese

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How to Say Please in Japanese 

By Kai Yoshizaki  & Kyle Jumara | June 26th, 2023

Understanding how to communicate appropriately is crucial to any language, as it gives off the impression that you put in hard work to learn the language as a foreigner, as well as gaining an appreciation and better understanding of the culture; taking Japanese for example, being able to properly say please in Japanese is a crucial aspect of this respect-driven language.

Taking up Japanese? It goes beyond mastering vocabulary and grammar rules; you're going to naturally embrace a new culture. Understanding how to say "please" is a significant part of this journey. The term "please" in Japanese changes according to the situation, and knowing how to use it correctly in casual chats, work-related talks, or formal exchanges is key. By starting with the humble "please," you're not just learning a language but also gaining a deeper insight into Japanese society.

This article is a part of our extensive series on Learning Japanese through Online Japanese Lessons at Japan Switch.

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The Subtlety of “Please” in Japanese

Japan is well-known for its respect-based culture, and this is even more evident in its language, Japanese. As with many languages, certain phrases and ways of expressing yourself in Japanese have a major impact on how you are perceived. Unlike English, Japanese has a higher focus on the level of formalities used and integrates varying degrees of formality and respect into its speech and written words which change based on who the other person is when addressing them. This linguistic characteristic shines through the practice of keigo, a system of honorific speech in Japanese.

Keigo consists of three distinct levels of politeness, each progressively more formal than the last. We may effectively express ourselves in Japanese through this linguistic understanding of knowing when and with whom to use certain phrases, as well as recognizing how even little changes in the words we use can affect how others see us. As we unravel the concept of please in Japanese, we'll navigate these different forms of keigo, providing a more holistic understanding of its nuance and usage.

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Common Ways to Say "Please" in Japanese

There are many iterations of using the word please in Japanese. We will look at some of the more common ways it is said and its common uses.

ください k udasai

ちょうだい choudai

お願いします onegai shimasu

いただけませんか itadakemasen ka

お願い致します onegai itashimasu

Using Please in Japanese Daily Conversations

While kudasai is often seen as a casual form of "please" in Japanese, it's worth noting that its use extends beyond informal scenarios. It's often used in requests for help, favors, and when asking for something. Let's explore how the different contexts shape the usage of this word.

Requesting something: 

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Requesting someone to do something:

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When asking for something:

Very polite requests:, when asking to repeat something:, choudai / ちょうだい rules:.

While choudai is considered a casual way to say "please" in Japanese, it's essential to note that its usage leans toward the informal and somewhat demanding side. For instance, translating "give me the document, please" to shorui o choudai might come off as rather forceful, despite the inclusion of "please". Let's examine a conversational context where choudai is utilized.

When demanding something:

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Using "Please" in Japanese Neutral Conversations

Onegai shimasu / お願いします rules:.

Onegai shimasu , the standard way of saying "please" in Japanese, sits comfortably in daily conversations, striking a neutral tone neither too formal nor too informal. For a slightly more formal feel, you might come across onegai itashimasu . While kudasai is less formal than onegai shimasu , all three are polite. Let's look into onegai shimasu , often used in response to questions and during requests. 

When requesting something politely:

In Japanese conversation, you'll often hear hai, onegai shimasu used repeatedly. This repetition might seem a bit peculiar initially, but it reflects the cultural norm of maintaining a high level of politeness in interactions.

When responding positively to a question:

When asking for someone to do something that is collaborative:.

Yoroshiku onegai shimasu is a handy phrase you'll hear a lot in Japan. There's no perfect English equivalent, but it's kind of like saying, "Let's get along well." It's a polite phrase used when you meet someone new, especially in a work or team setting. It basically means you're looking forward to good teamwork. The person is saying, "Please take care of me," or "Let's work well together." It's a cool cultural nuance, an understanding that cooperation is the best way to work!

Don't know what Japanese words are the most useful to cover when learning Japanese? Check out our article on the Top 1000 Japanese Words You Need to Know !

Douzo / どうぞ Rules

Douzo also roughly translates to please, but is used when offering something to someone. Similar to the word please in “please sit down.”

When offering assistance:

Here, douzo functions as a polite invitation to engage, similar to the English "please feel free to...". It demonstrates the speaker's readiness to help and encourages the co-worker to ask for assistance as needed.

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Using "Please" in Japanese Formal Conversations

Taking the phrase “please” from onegai shimasu to onegai itashimasu , we shift towards a more formal version of the previous form. This is commonly used when you are addressing someone of higher status. Typically, higher-status individuals can include people who are older than you, a boss, teacher, or elder whom you respect. If you want to step up your formalities even further, you can use itadakemasen ka . This phrase is a polite way to ask for something in Japanese and is particularly suited when addressing individuals of higher status.

Itadakemasen ka / いただけませんか rules:

When making requests to people you should show respect for, you can use itadakemasen ka instead of kudasai or onegai shimasu  for added politeness when requesting something.

Respectfully requesting for help from a senior

Asking for help to someone you respect:, asking a stranger to take a photo of something:, learn japanese the right way.

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Onegai itashimasu / お願いいたします rules:

Onegai itashimasu and onegai shimasu are interchangeable forms of saying “please”. To go one step further in terms of formality, you would say onegai itashimasu which would more typically be used for formal interactions such as legal issues, if you are trying to make a good impression at your new workplace, or with potential/current clients.

When calling a number to request a certain person

When requesting to change your shift, how not to use "please".

Given the courteous nature of these expressions, it's unlikely you'll cause offense if you mistakenly use them out of context. However, you should be aware of certain nuances. For instance, appending "please" to a request for a burdensome task can inadvertently come across as disrespectful or patronizing. Furthermore, kudasai should typically be used when requesting something that is rightfully yours, not when making a request on behalf of someone else. Understanding these subtle distinctions can make all the difference in your Japanese language interactions.

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Purizu / プリーズ:

Phonetically similar to “pulleys” is purizu which is the English word “please” written out phonetically. Avoid using this form as it sounds childish and could come across as improper in nearly all situations.

Advice from a Native Speaker

Doing a quick translation of the word “please” will most likely be either onegai shimasu and  kudasai , these words are mostly interchangeable, but there are some cases where you can't use kudasai and some cases where you can’t use onegai shimasu.

In this conversation, kudasai is used to extend a polite invitation to the friend to come over for dinner. The use of this phrase showcases its role in maintaining politeness in day-to-day Japanese conversations.

Related Phrases & Guides

If you're looking for more helpful guides to aid you in your journey through Japan and its culture, check out our following guides:

Top 40 Japanese Slang to Know Top 15 Tips to Make Japanese Friends Guide to Japanese Language Exchange Ultimate Guide to Moving to Japan Ultimate Guide to Finding a Good Japanese Book Ultimate Guide to Karaoke in Tokyo

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14 Japanese Phrases To Use To Make Requests And Ask For Help

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Japanese is a useful skill to if you run into trouble or want to ask a favor while traveling in Japan. Learn basic expressions and simple ways to ask for help and make requests in different situations, including asking questions to restaurants and local businesses, and in emergencies.

Mayo Nomura

Get Help Using Japanese!

You're bound to have times when you're in a bit of a jam, don't know something or need help while on vacation anywhere in the world. Since a lot of people in Japan think that they aren't good at English, you might not be able to communicate easily in English with the locals. If you can talk to them using Japanese words, you'll be able to consult them about your problems and get help more easily.

In this article, we'll learn some convenient Japanese words and expressions to use when you want to ask a question or request something!

If you want to boost your Japanese language skills through online or in-person lessons, consider applying for a course at Tokyo Central Japanese Language School (TCJ).

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*For the pronunciation of words in the squared brackets, please refer to Basic Information about Japanese Pronunciation and Polite Speech

Basic Information about Japanese Pronunciation and Polite Speech Basic Japanese Phrases You Can Use While In Japan! Thank You! 7 Japanese Phrases To Express Your Gratitude Ask For Directions In Japanese! 14 Phrases You Need To Know Essential Phrases To Use When You're Sick, In The Hospital Or Drug Store In Japan

Polite Words to Use Before Asking a Question

1. sumimasen. /sorry, pardon..

[sumimasen] Sumimasen is an expression used when calling out to someone, apologizing lightly, and to convey appreciation.

Before speaking to a stranger, first call out to them by saying sumimasen . If you find that it is difficult to say this word, you can also say suimasen [suimasen] instead.

2. Chotto ii desu ka? / Excuse me.

[chotto i:deska] Ii desu ka? is an expression used when asking the other person if it is okay to do or ask them something. If your question or request is going to take a bit of time to accomplish, it is best to combine it with "sumimasen".

Sumimasen, chotto ii desu ka? [Sumimasen, chotto i:deska?] is a polite way to say it.

Other Examples:

Kono pen, ii desu ka? May I borrow this pen? [kono pen i:deska]

When we want to borrow a pen from the front desk, ask this question while pointing at the pen.

Shashin, ii desu ka? / May I take a photo? Or Can you take a photo of me? [shashin i:deska]

When you want someone to take your picture at a sightseeing location or are asking if you are allowed to take photos, ask the question (if for a photo of yourself, while handing over the camera ).

Chotto means ‘a little’. It's a Japanese word often used when requesting something.

3. Eigo demo ii desu ka? / Is English ok?

[e:go demo i:deska?]

When it's difficult to explain your situation in Japanese, ask them this to see if they can understand any English. If you want to speak in Japanese, but the other person is trying to speak English to you, you can ask Nihongo demo ii desu ka? [nihongo demo i:deska?] .

4. Chotto oshiete kudasai/Could you tell me

[chotto oshiete kudasai]

Use these Japanese words when you want directions or there's something you don't know.

5. Chotto kite kudasai/Could you come with me?

[chotto kite kudasai]

This expression is helpful when there is something you don’t understand how to use in your hotel room and you would like the staff to come with you to explain it.

6. Chotto matte kudasai. / Please wait a moment.

[chotto matte kudasai]

Use these Japanese words when you want someone to wait for you for a little bit.

A Common Mistake: In English, the expression "one second" means you want them to wait a bit. However, in Japanese there's a chance the phrase "ichi byou" won't be understood, so please be careful.

Expressions for When You're in Trouble

7. mou chotto yukkuri onegai shimasu. / please speak more slowly..

[mo: chotto yukkuri onegai shimas]

If the other person is speaking very quickly in Japanese, use this expression to politely ask them to slow down.

8. Butaniku wa chotto... / I cannot eat pork...

[butanikuwa chotto] ◯◯wa chotto... [◯◯wa chotto] is an expression used to express something that you're bad at, don't like or can’t eat/drink. Convey this by stretching out the ending and lowering the pitch while using a regretful facial expression .

*Examples: Oniku wa chotto… / I cannot eat meat... [onikuwa chotto]

Gyuniku wa chotto… I cannot eat beef... [gyu:nikuwa chotto]

Tamago wa chotto… I cannot eat eggs... [tamagowa chotto]

Nama mono wa chotto… I cannot eat raw food... [namamonowa chotto]

For those who can't eat certain kinds of meat, the following phrases will be very helpful.

Kore wa nan no oniku desu ka? / What kind of meat is this? [korewa nanno oniku deska] * When saying [na nn o], please pronounce the [nn] stretched out. If you say [nano], it sounds very unnatural.

The terms for the main different meat types are:

butaniku [butaniku] (pork), gyuniku [gyu:niku] (beef), toriniku [toriniku] (chicken), ramu [ramu] (lamb), but there are of course others not listed here.

9. Bejitarian de... / I’m a vegetarian...

[bejitariande] ◯◯de... [◯◯de] is an expression used when expressing your situation to the other person. Say it by stretching out the ending and lowering the pitch .

Examples: Arerugi de… / I have an allergy... [arerugi:de]

Shuukyou de… / Because of my religion... [shu:kyo:de]

Nigate de… / I’m not good at/I don’t like... [nigatede]

10. Chuugokugo ga wakaru hito imasu ka? / Is there anyone who understands Chinese?

[chu:gokugoga wakaru hitowa imaska] * [h] … is a sound where you tighten your mouth and breath out, or the sound of the English word ‘he’ (he, she). If you've studied German before it'll sound like the German sound ch of ich .

◯◯ga wakaru hito wa imasu ka? [◯◯ga wakaru htowa imaska] is useful when asking whether there is someone available that can speak your native language. Put your own country's language in the ◯◯ space.

Eigo [e:go] English

Kankokugo [kankokugo] Korean

Betonamugo [betonamugo] Vietnamese

Taigo [taigo] Thai

Indoneshiago [indoneshiago] Indonesian

Expressions When Asking for Help

11. tasukete/help.

Just as in English, this word is used in an emergency. Tetsudatte is an expression used when not in an emergency, and means ‘please help me’. When in an emergency, say taskete in a loud, clear voice.

12. Yamete!/Stop!

If someone is touching you or bothering you in a way that is making you uncomfortable, say this in a loud, clear voice.

13. Keisatsu o yonde kudasai / Please call the police

[ke:satsuo yonde kudasai]

Tell this to someone around you when something bad has happened and you need the police immediately.

* [tsu] is the sound coming at the end of the English words ‘cats’ and ‘boots’. Make sure you do not separate the ‘t’ and ‘su’.

14. Kyuukyuusha o yonde kudasai. / Please call for an ambulance.

[kyu: kyu:shao yonde kudasai]

If you are feeling extremely sick or have been seriously injured, call for an ambulance. In some countries, people use ambulances like taxis, but in Japan they are only used for serious medical emergencies.

Essential Phrases To Use When You're Sick, In The Hospital Or Drug Store In Japan Ask For Directions In Japanese! 14 Phrases You Need To Know What You Should Know About Public Safety Before Visiting Japan A Must-Read For Female Travelers: Dealing With Crime in Japan

1. Sumimasen. [sumimasen]

2. Chotto ii desu ka? [chotto i:deska]

3. Eigo demo ii desu ka? [e:go demo i:deska]

4. Chotto oshiete kudasai. [chotto oshiete kudasai]

5. Chotto kite kudasai. [chotto kite kudasai]

6. Chotto matte kudasai. [chotto matte kudasai]

7. Mou chotto yukkuri onegai shimasu. [mo: chotto yukkuri onegai shimas]

8. Butaniku wa chotto... [butanikuwa chotto]

9. Bejitarian de... [bejitariande]

10. Chuugokugo ga wakaru hito wa imasu ka? [chu:gokugoga wakaru htowa imaska]

11. Tasukete! [taskete]

12. Yamete! [yamete]

13. Keisatsu o yonde kudasai. [ke:satsuo yonde kudasai]

14. Kyuukyuusha yonde kudasai. [kyu: kyu:shao yonde kudasai]

How was it? If you say [chotto sumimasen] someone is bound to help you out! If you find yourself in trouble, please stay calm, take care of the situation and do your best to overcome it. For those already studying, we recommend taking online conversation lessons with CafeTalk (1,000 yen coupon included) .

Recommended articles:

Basic Information about Japanese Pronunciation and Polite Speech Basic Japanese Phrases You Can Use While In Japan! Ask For Directions In Japanese! 14 Phrases You Need To Know Thank You! 7 Japanese Phrases To Express Your Gratitude 13 Japanese Phrases For Shopping In Japan 13 Japanese Phrases You Can Use At Restaurants 10 Japanese Phrases You Can Use At A Hotel Essential Phrases To Use When You're Sick, In The Hospital Or Drug Store In Japan

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please visit us again in japanese

  • How do you say this in Japanese? When you return from America, Let's meet up.
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Russia-Ukraine war: Germany says Kremlin’s claim it is planning war with Russia is ‘absurd’ – as it happened

German ambassador to Moscow summoned to Russian foreign ministry in order to explain leaked military discussion. This live blog is now closed

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A Ukrainian infantryman observes enemy positions from a trench near Kreminna, Donetsk oblast, Ukraine.

Germany says Kremlin's claim it is planning war with Russia is 'absurd'

Kate Connolly

Germany’s ambassador to Moscow was summoned to the Russian foreign ministry on Monday in order to explain the leaked discussion between senior military personnel about sending weapons to Ukraine.

Alexander Graf Lamsdorff arrived at the foreign ministry without responding to journalists’ requests for comment, according to reports on Russian news agencies.

Germany’s defence minister, Boris Pistorius , has accused Russia of waging “an information war” against Germany, by intercepting and then leaking a sensitive meeting among high-level military officers of the German military or Bundeswehr.

Russia has accused Germany, backed by its allies, of planning an all-out war on Russia.

Russia’s foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov , said the leaked discussions showed that the appetite for war in Europe “still remains very very high”, and the aim was to ensure “Russia’s strategic defeat on the battlefield”.

The former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev commented that: “Germany is planning a war with Russia”.

Pistorius dismissed the reactions as: “completely absurd”, accusing Moscow of wanting to sow distrust and discord in Germany.

German defence minister blames Vladimir Putin for military leak – video

In the telephone conference, four officers, including the head of Germany’s air force, Ingo Gerhartz, prepare for a discussion with defence minister Pistorius about the possible deployment of Taurus missiles to Ukraine , coming to the conclusion that a speedy delivery and the use of the missiles in the immediate future would only be possible if German soldiers were involved.

Taurus training for Ukrainian soldiers in order to avoid putting German soldiers on Ukraine soil, was a possibility, but would take months of preparation. The officers also discussed the possibility of using the missiles to destroy the Russian-built bridge connecting the illegally annexed Crimean peninsula and Russia.

Last week, Germany’s chancellor, Olaf Scholz , ruled out the sending of Taurus missiles because he said the operation would involve sending German troops to Ukraine. He said: “German soldiers can at no point and in no place be linked with the targets that this (Taurus) system reaches. Not even in Germany.”

As the German government struggles to deal with the fallout from the leak, with questions asked about the security of its internal communications and speculation over what other discussions Russia has been able to listen in on, defence policy experts said the intercepted communication was clearly meant to undermine Germany’s Ukraine strategy.

Roderich Kiesewette, the opposition Christian Democrats’ defence expert, said that Russia had leaked the meeting at this moment in time in order to specifically: “undermine a German Taurus delivery”. He suggested the leak was carried out “in order to divert public conversation away” from other issues, including the death of Alexei Navalny .

Closing summary

Ukraine said it had not seen the €16bn (£13.7bn) in proceeds from two donor conferences held in Poland in 2022, early on into Russia’s full-scale invasion. The two events in 2022 had raised 10 billion and six billion euros, respectively, the Ukrainian prime minister, Denys Shmygal , told a press conference .

A first-of-its-kind training exercise involving more than 20,000 soldiers from over a dozen countries has launched across northern Norway, Sweden and Finland as the region prepares to become a fully Nato territory within days. The training exercise across air, land and sea – which will also include soldiers from the UK, US, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium and Canada – will incorporate a cross-border operations exercise in the Arctic Circle.

The Kremlin said a purported recording of German military discussions showed Germany’s armed forces were discussing plans to launch strikes on Russian territory. Russian media on Friday published a 38-minute recording of a call in which German officers were heard discussing weapons for Ukraine and a potential strike by Kyiv on a bridge in Crimea. Germany’s ambassador to Moscow, Alexander Graf Lamsdorff , was summoned to the Russian foreign ministry on Monday in order to explain the leaked discussion . Russia’s foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov , said the leaked discussions showed that the appetite for war in Europe “still remains very very high”, and the aim was to ensure “Russia’s strategic defeat on the battlefield”. The former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev commented that: “Germany is planning a war with Russia”. Germany’s defence minister, Boris Pistorius , dismissed the reactions as “completely absurd”, accusing Moscow of wanting to sow distrust and discord in Germany.

Disqualified Russian presidential candidate Boris Nadezhdin said he would keep filing challenges against his exclusion from this month’s election after his latest appeal was rejected by the supreme court .

Ukraine’s military intelligence agency launched a cyber-attack against the servers of the Russian defence ministry, gaining access to “a bulk of classified service documents,” the agency said .

Ukraine says it has not received over £13bn from fundraisers

Ukraine said it had not seen the €16bn (£13.7bn) in proceeds from two donor conferences held in Poland in 2022, early on into Russia’s full-scale invasion.

The announcement comes amid concerns in Kyiv surrounding military and financial support, with the war entering its third year.

The two events in 2022 had raised 10 billion and six billion euros, respectively, the Ukrainian prime minister, Denys Shmygal , told a press conference.

“Ukraine received nothing from them. The funds were raised by Poland together with the European Commission to support Ukraine,” he said.

“Where did they go, what did they support … Ukraine has received nothing,” he added.

Kyiv has warned it desperately needs more military and financial assistance as it waits for a fresh $60bn package of US aid held up in Washington.

Here is more on the deal Poland signed a deal to buy anti-tank grenade launchers from Sweden’s Saab .

The deal concerns the Carl-Gustaf M4 grenade launcher , which is intended to combat all types of modern combat vehicles.

Poland’s defence minister, Wladyslaw Kosiniak-Kamysz, said Poland would receive several thousand grenade launchers and several hundred thousand rounds of ammunition, as well as the necessary infrastructure, training and other elements necessary to use the weapon.

Poland signed a deal to buy anti-tank grenade launchers from Sweden’s Saab in a deal worth 6.5 billion złotys (£1.3bn), Poland’s defence minister, Wladyslaw Kosiniak-Kamysz, has said.

Warsaw has been one of Kyiv’s staunchest supporters since Russia invaded Ukraine in February 2022 and has said Ukraine must regain control over all of its territory in order to deter Moscow from further aggression.

This year, Poland – which borders the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad – is spending about 4% of gross domestic product on defence as it seeks to strengthen its armed forces in the face of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine .

British soldiers are “on the ground” in Ukraine helping Kyiv’s forces fire long-range Storm Shadow missiles , according to a leak in Russian media of a top-secret call involving German air force officers.

The Kremlin said the leak demonstrated the direct involvement of the “collective west” in the war in Ukraine – while former British defence ministers expressed frustration with the German military in response to the revelations.

Released on Friday by the editor of the Kremlin-controlled news channel RT, Margarita Simonyan, the audio recording – confirmed as authentic by Germany – captures Luftwaffe officers discussing how Berlin’s Taurus missiles could be used to try to blow up the Kerch Bridge connecting Russia with occupied Crimea.

During the conversation, Lt Gen Ingo Gerhartz, the head of the Luftwaffe, describes how Britain works with Ukraine on deploying Storm Shadow missiles against targets up to 150 miles behind Russian lines.

“When it comes to mission planning,” the German commander says, “I know how the English do it, they do it completely in reachback. They also have a few people on the ground, they do that, the French don’t.”

Reachback is a military term to describe how intelligence, equipment and support from the rear is brought forward to units deployed on the front, but Gerhartz suggests the British approach is deeper, involving support on site.

You can read the full story by my colleagues, Dan Sabbagh and Kate Connolly , here:

Polish farmers’ blockade of the border with Ukraine has not affected the delivery of military or humanitarian aid to the country, Ukraine’s prime minister, Denys Shmygal , has said.

Farmers have been blocking the border and other highways to protest what they say is unfair competition from goods entering the Polish market from Ukraine.

“There have been no cases of delivery of weapons and military equipment, humanitarian aid, or fuel to Ukraine being blocked,” Shmygal told reporters in Kyiv.

“No cargo officially registered as military or humanitarian has been detained,” he added.

Here are some of the latest images coming out from the newswires:

Germany’s ambassador to Moscow, Alexander Graf Lamsdorff, outside the Russian foreign ministry in Moscow.

A group of more than 40 countries reiterated calls for Russia to allow an independent international investigation into the death of opposition leader Alexei Navalny in prison.

The call was made by EU ambassador Lotte Knudsen at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on behalf of all 27 EU states and 16 other countries, including Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States and Ukraine , according to Reuters.

Knudsen said:

We are outraged by the death of the Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny, for which the ultimate responsibility lies with President [Vladimir] Putin and the Russian authorities. Russia must allow an independent and transparent international investigation into the circumstances of his sudden death.

Navalny, Putin’s fiercest critic inside Russia, died at the age of 47 in an Arctic penal colony on 16 February, sparking accusations from his supporters that he had been murdered.

The Kremlin has denied any state involvement in the death of the opposition leader, who was laid to rest in Moscow on Friday.

Russia’s Investigative Committee says it has launched a procedural investigation into the death, and the Kremlin has said it does not bow to EU demands.

UN Nuclear watchdog chief Rafael Grossi said he intends to discuss Russia’s plans for the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant it is occupying in Ukraine when he meets Russian President Vladimir Putin this week.

Grossi is due to leave for Russia on Tuesday, he told a press conference on the opening day of a quarterly meeting of his agency’s 35-nation Board of Governors at which envoys from various countries marked the second anniversary of Russian forces seizing the Zaporizhzhia plant, Reuters reports.

Grossi’s trip to Russia has long been planned. He originally intended to go there last month after a trip to Ukraine.

When asked what he would discuss with Putin, Grossi said:

There are issues related to the future operational status of the plant. Is it going to be started or not? What is the idea? What is the idea in terms of the external power supply lines, since what we see is extremely fragile and thin?

Zaporizhzhia, Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, has lost its connection to all its external power lines eight times in the past 18 months, forcing it to rely on diesel generators for essential functions like cooling fuel in its reactors to avoid a potentially catastrophic meltdown.

While one of its main power lines is now functioning and its six reactors are in shutdown, which reduces the operational risk, the International Atomic Energy Agency says the situation at the plant remains precarious.

Although Grossi stopped short of spelling out that he would meet Putin , he said:

It’s the idea … This is the intention.

He left open what other issues might be discussed.

I would not be coming with a fixed list of items. As it happens, when I have a meeting with a world leader that has responsibilities, and in particular a nuclear-weapon possessor state, permanent member of the security council, I cannot exclude that other things are discussed.

A Russian prosecutor has asked for the jail term of a former staffer of Alexei Navalny to be increased, Navalny’s team said on Telegram, in the first major court hearing related to an ally of the opposition politician since his death last month.

Liliya Chanysheva , the former head of Navalny’s office in the central Bashkortostan region, and her former colleague, Rustem Mulyukov, were the first Navalny staffers to be convicted of national security charges after his organisation was deemed “extremist” in 2021, Reuters reports.

Navalny, one of president Vladimir Putin’s fiercest critics inside Russia, died aged 47 in an Artic penal colony on 16 February. The Kremlin has angrily rejected claims it was involved in his death.

Chanysheva was handed a seven-and-a-half year sentence last year for participating in Navalny’s organisation, while Mulyukov received two-and-a-half years for similar charges.

A prosecutor in a cassation court in Samara on Monday demanded Chanysheva’s sentence be increased to ten years because she “provoked and incited Ufa residents” to protest in the streets, referring to Bashkortostan’s capital, independent outlet SOTA quoted the prosecutor as saying.

The cassation court returned Chanysheva and Mulyukov’s cases to Bashkortostan’s supreme court for a new examination, her lawyer wrote on Telegram.

At least two other Navalny staffers remain imprisoned in Russia: Vadim Ostanin, who ran Navalny’s branch in Barnaul and Ksenia Fadeyeva, a local lawmaker and former head of Navalny’s anti-corruption organisation in Tomsk.

Several of Navalny’s lawyers were also detained last year and are awaiting trial.

Ukraine expects the European Commission to present a negotiation framework for Kyiv’s accession to the EU “no later than 12 March”, deputy prime minister for European and Euro-Atlantic Integration Olga Stefanishyna has been quoted as saying.

“No later than 12 March, we expect the European Commission to present a negotiation framework and assess the progress of reforms so that EU countries can make a decision on 19 March,” Stefanishyna told journalists, according to Ukrinform.

“We hope that there will be no delays,” she added.

The European Commission recommended last November that formal EU membership negotiations with Ukraine and Moldova should begin, which its president, Ursula von der Leyen, described as a response to “the call of history”.

It started screening Ukraine’s legislation for compliance with EU laws in January, marking the initial step of the accession process, which includes meeting the necessary economic and legal criteria.

Summary of the day so far...

Nato will start an exercise on Monday to defend its newly expanded Nordic territory when more than 20,000 soldiers from over a dozen countries take part in drills lasting nearly two weeks in the northern regions of Finland , Norway and Sweden . With over 4,000 Finnish soldiers taking part, the Norway-led Nordic Response 2024 drills are part of the largest Nato military exercise in decades. “For the first time, Finland will participate as a Nato member nation in exercising collective defense of the alliance’s regions,” the Finnish Defense Forces said .

Disqualified Russian presidential candidate Boris Nadezhdin said he would keep filing challenges against his exclusion from this month’s election after his latest appeal was rejected by the supreme court on Monday .

Disqualified Russian presidential candidate Boris Nadezhdin said he would keep filing challenges against his exclusion from this month’s election after his latest appeal was rejected by the supreme court on Monday (see earlier post at 10.33 for more details).

Nadezhdin had tried to run against Vladimir Putin on an anti-war ticket but was barred from standing when the Central Election Commission said it had found irregularities, including names of dead people, in the list of supporters’ signatures he had presented in support of his candidacy.

He said on Monday he planned to file a further complaint to the presidium of the supreme court and then to the constitutional court.

“I’m not going to stop, I’ll fight until the end,” he said.

Nadezhdin conceded weeks ago that he has “zero” chance of appearing on the ballot for the March 15-17 election, but has used the protracted appeal process to portray himself as a fighter intent on playing a future role in Russia’s politics.

Hungary’s prime minister, Viktor Orbán , will meet former US President Donald Trump this Friday in Florida, Reuters reports.

“It is not gambling but actually betting on the only sensible chance, that we in Hungary bet on the return of President Trump,” he told an economic forum on Monday.

“The only chance of the world for a relatively fast peace deal is political change in the United States, and this is linked to who is the president.”

The Hungarian leader, who has refused to send weapons to Ukraine and kept up close economic ties with Russia since the full-scale invasion in 2022, has repeatedly said that only the return of Trump to the White House could bring peace in Ukraine.

An object that fell in a field in Poland , a Nato member, was a weather balloon, it has been confirmed.

The Fakt tabloid reported earlier on Monday that a military object had fallen in a field near the town of Milakowo , but police in nearby Ostroda clater onfirmed to Reuters that the object was a weather balloon.

“I confirm that this morning we received a report that an object fell in the fields near Milakowo, now we can confirm that it was a meteorological balloon,” a police spokesperson said.

“Our activities here focused on securing this place until the arrival of the army, and at the moment we are trying to explain the origin of this object and why it was found in these fields in our area.”

In November 2022, a stray Ukrainian missile struck the Polish village of Przewodow in southern Poland, killing two people and raising fears at the time of the war in Ukraine spilling over the border.

Poland plans to ask the EU to put sanctions on Russian and Belarusian agricultural products, the country’s prime minister, Donald Tusk , said on Monday during a visit to the Lithuanian capital Vilnius.

Tusk has said agricultural products from Russia and Belarus were causing market distortions.

“Latvia decided to implement an embargo on the import of (agricultural) products from Russia,” he told a news conference last week. “We will analyse the case of Latvia, and I do not rule out that Poland will take an appropriate initiative.”

Germany’s chancellor, Olaf Scholz , has ruled out arming Ukraine with long-range Taurus missiles if German soldiers needed to be involved to help operate them.

“You cannot deliver a weapons system that has a very wide reach and then not think about how control over the weapons system can take place,” he was quoted by Reuters as saying at a school function.

“And if you want to have control and it’s only possible if German soldiers are involved, that’s out of the question for me.”

Germany has so far resisted sending Taurus missiles to Ukraine, wary of widening the scope of the war and being dragged into a direct confrontation with Russia .

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  1. To those who is coming to Japan

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  3. WHO WANTS TO COME TO JAPAN!? #japan #japanese #にほんご #日本語 #food

COMMENTS

  1. How do you say "please visit again" in Japanese?

    Japanese. 「またお越しください。. 「mata okoshi kudasai.」. To friend ↓. 「また来てね。. 「mata kite ne.」. Show romaji/hiragana. See a translation. 2 likes.

  2. 11 Natural Ways to Say "Come Here" in Japanese

    There is a simple way to say "Come here" in Japanese. However, there are many other less direct and polite ways to say it. Here are 10 natural ways to say "Come here" in Japanese. 1. Standard Expression: ここに来て下さい (Koko Ni Kite Kudasai): Please Come Here. ここに来て下さい ( Koko ni kite kudasai) is the typical ...

  3. Google Translate

    Google's service, offered free of charge, instantly translates words, phrases, and web pages between English and over 100 other languages.

  4. 16 Ways to Say "Please" in Japanese from Onegai and Onward

    お願い申し上げます (Onegai moushi agemasu) — I humbly request [very polite] ください (Kudasai) — Please [for a request] ちょうだい (Choudai) — Please give. プリーズ (Purīzu) — Please [casual] 願わくば (Negawakuba) — If I may humbly request. …いただけないでしょうか (…Itadakenaideshou ka ...

  5. How do you say "Please, come and visit us again!" in Japanese?

    Please, come and visit us again! See a translation Exactly, I am working on a Digital Art where 2 nice girls of a Maid Cafe in Tokyo, They say " Please, come and visit us again!

  6. How do you say "Please visit us again." in Japanese?

    By sending a gift to someone, they will be more likely to answer your questions again! If you post a question after sending a gift to someone, your question will be displayed in a special section on that person's feed.

  7. How To Say 'Please' In Japanese

    おまちください。 Wait a moment, please. / Please wait a little. / Please hold for a moment (on the phone) Or in some cases, chotto matte kudasai (ちょっと待ってください)can be used to soften the phrase. Kudasaimase is the polite, imperative form of kudasai used by staff in customer-service settings to make respectful requests to customers in a shop.

  8. How to Say "Please in Japanese": Mastering Politeness

    How to Say "Please in Japanese": Mastering Politeness. The most common way to express "please" is "ください (kudasai)", which is used when asking for something. This word is usually placed at the end of a sentence after the object that you are requesting. Another term, "お願いします (onegaishimasu)", is often used in a more formal ...

  9. How to Say Please in Japanese: Making Polite Requests and Favors

    The most common and versatile word for "please" in Japanese is "ください" (Kudasai). This word is used when making a direct request for something or asking someone to do something for you. It is considered polite and respectful and can be used in various situations, such as ordering food, requesting assistance, or asking for ...

  10. Different ways to express "Again" in Japanese

    1) "また" is a simple way to say "again", and is pretty well known by even beginning Japanese learners due to some common expressions it is used in: またね (see you again) また明日 (see you tomorrow) また今度 (see you later) These are sometimes prefixed by "じゃ" which translates to something like "Well…".

  11. How to Say Please in Japanese

    3) 3. お願いします (onegai shimasu) 4) 4. どうぞ (dōzo) 5) 5. プリーズ (puriizu) 1. 下さい (kudasai) The first way to say please in Japanese that I wanted to cover today is 下さい (kudasai) which is usually just written in hiragana as ください instead of with its 下 kanji.

  12. "Please" in Japanese

    Saying "please" in Japanese - Sentence structure. A quick and easy grammar note worth clarifying before moving on any further is about Japanese sentence structure.When making polite requests in Japanese, "please" always comes at the very end of the request! So, whereas in English, you may say, "please pass the salt, " this doesn't work in Japanese.

  13. How To Say "Again" In Japanese

    2. 改めて (aratamete) The word 改めて also means "again" in Japanese, but it's slightly different from the first word that we covered. This new word has more of a "once again" feeling to it and get's used in different situations than また typically would. 改めて憂鬱になっていた。. aratamete yuu'utsu ni natte ita.

  14. 行く・来る: Japanese Verbs for "Go" and "Come"

    The Basics. 行く (いく・ゆく) and 来る (くる) are Japanese words for "to go" and "to come." The way you use 行く and 来る are mostly the same as their English counterparts. For example, imagine you and your friend are running to the platform to catch a train. To say "the train will come soon," you use 来る: 電車. (.

  15. How to say "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for ...

    The most basic and casual way to say "thank you for coming" is: 来てくれてありがとう。. Kite kurete arigatou. This is basically "Thank you / Thanks for coming". You would use this with good friends and family, whether you've invited them to your house, a performance, an event, etc. or they accompanied you to something.

  16. How to Say Please in Japanese

    Customer. はい、お願いします。. Hai, onegai shimasu. Yes please. In Japanese conversation, you'll often hear hai, onegai shimasu used repeatedly. This repetition might seem a bit peculiar initially, but it reflects the cultural norm of maintaining a high level of politeness in interactions.

  17. 14 Japanese Phrases To Use To Make Requests And Ask For Help

    6. Chotto matte kudasai. / Please wait a moment. [chotto matte kudasai] Use these Japanese words when you want someone to wait for you for a little bit. A Common Mistake: In English, the expression "one second" means you want them to wait a bit. However, in Japanese there's a chance the phrase "ichi byou" won't be understood, so please be careful.

  18. email

    For example, this is the Yahoo! Japan's guidance. ★MyYahoo!では Yahoo! JAPANページを 自分仕様にカスタマイズできます! ・ドラッグ&ドロップで、自分が 見やすい位置にコンテンツを移動 ・ヤフオクやメールなど、いつも 使っているYahoo!

  19. また日本に来てねって英語でなんて言うの?

    日本に また来てね と英語で言うには「Please come to Japan again」がいいかと思います。. また、普通にまた来てね(Please come again)でもいいです。. お店で聞く「 またお越しくださいね 」も「Please come again」です。. 役に立った. 49. 回答したアンカーのサイト ...

  20. Could you repeat that please?

    Another cheat I use all the time is built on the concept of repeating everything the other side says on a business call in Japan (and adding ということですね as a suffix). If you're in the right ballpark, just throw out something as a guess. If you're wrong, they'll tell you again (and hopefully clearer/slower).

  21. Japanese Phrases

    CLICK HERE→ http://www.punipunijapan.com/japanese-phrases-mou-ichidoClick this link to go to today's video review and learn more about the Japanese phrase of...

  22. How do you say "'Please visit us again! From: your friends in America

    5 Mar 2019. English (US)

  23. AGAIN

    AGAIN translate: もう一度, 再び, また, 以前のように, 元の通り, 再(ふたた)び, もとの状態(じょうたい)へ. Learn more in the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary.

  24. Israel-Hamas war: Netanyahu's rival takes unsanctioned trip to US

    The visit comes as friction between the US and Netanyahu is rising over how to alleviate the suffering of Palestinians in Gaza. Netanyahu's rival takes unsanctioned trip to US, signalling cracks ...

  25. Russia-Ukraine war: Germany says Kremlin's claim it is planning war

    Closing summary. Ukraine said it had not seen the €16bn (£13.7bn) in proceeds from two donor conferences held in Poland in 2022, early on into Russia's full-scale invasion.