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The twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are exploring where nothing from Earth has flown before. Continuing on their more-than-44-year journey since their 1977 launches, they each are much farther away from Earth and the sun than Pluto. In August 2012, Voyager 1 made the historic entry into interstellar space, the region between stars, filled with material ejected by the death of nearby stars millions of years ago. Scientists are learning more about this region since Voyager 2 left the heliosphere in November 2018 and joined Voyager 1 in interstellar space. Both spacecraft are still sending scientific information about their surroundings through the Deep Space Network, or DSN.

The primary mission was the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. After making a string of discoveries there - such as active volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io and intricacies of Saturn's rings - the mission was extended. Voyager 2 went on to explore Uranus and Neptune, and is still the only spacecraft to have visited those outer planets. The adventurers' current mission, the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), will explore the outermost edge of the Sun's domain. And beyond.

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News | August 17, 2022

Voyager, nasa's longest-lived mission, logs 45 years in space.

Voyager spacecraft

Launched in 1977, the twin Voyager probes are NASA’s longest-operating mission and the only spacecraft ever to explore interstellar space.

NASA’s twin Voyager probes have become, in some ways, time capsules of their era: They each carry an eight-track tape player for recording data, they have about 3 million times less memory than modern cellphones, and they transmit data about 38,000 times slower than a 5G internet connection.

Yet the Voyagers remain on the cutting edge of space exploration. Managed and operated by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, they are the only probes to ever explore interstellar space – the galactic ocean that our Sun and its planets travel through.

The Sun and the planets reside in the heliosphere, a protective bubble created by the Sun’s magnetic field and the outward flow of solar wind (charged particles from the Sun). Researchers – some of them younger than the two distant spacecraft – are combining Voyager’s observations with data from newer missions to get a more complete picture of our Sun and how the heliosphere interacts with interstellar space.

“The heliophysics mission fleet provides invaluable insights into our Sun, from understanding the corona or the outermost part of the Sun’s atmosphere, to examining the Sun’s impacts throughout the solar system, including here on Earth, in our atmosphere, and on into interstellar space,” said Nicola Fox, director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Over the last 45 years, the Voyager missions have been integral in providing this knowledge and have helped change our understanding of the Sun and its influence in ways no other spacecraft can.”

The Voyagers are also ambassadors, each carrying a golden record containing images of life on Earth, diagrams of basic scientific principles, and audio that includes sounds from nature, greetings in multiple languages, and music. The gold-coated records serve as a cosmic “message in a bottle” for anyone who might encounter the space probes. At the rate gold decays in space and is eroded by cosmic radiation, the records will last more than a billion years.

Beyond Expectations

Voyager 2 launched on Aug. 20, 1977, quickly followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5. Both probes traveled to Jupiter and Saturn, with Voyager 1 moving faster and reaching them first. Together, the probes unveiled much about the solar system’s two largest planets and their moons. Voyager 2 also became the first and only spacecraft to fly close to Uranus (in 1986) and Neptune (in 1989), offering humanity remarkable views of – and insights into – these distant worlds.

While Voyager 2 was conducting these flybys, Voyager 1 headed toward the boundary of the heliosphere. Upon exiting it in 2012 , Voyager 1 discovered that the heliosphere blocks 70% of cosmic rays, or energetic particles created by exploding stars. Voyager 2, after completing its planetary explorations, continued to the heliosphere boundary, exiting in 2018 . The twin spacecraft’s combined data from this region has challenged previous theories about the exact shape of the heliosphere.

“Today, as both Voyagers explore interstellar space, they are providing humanity with observations of uncharted territory,” said Linda Spilker, Voyager’s deputy project scientist at JPL. “This is the first time we’ve been able to directly study how a star, our Sun, interacts with the particles and magnetic fields outside our heliosphere, helping scientists understand the local neighborhood between the stars, upending some of the theories about this region, and providing key information for future missions.”

The Long Journey

Over the years, the Voyager team has grown accustomed to surmounting challenges that come with operating such mature spacecraft, sometimes calling upon retired colleagues for their expertise or digging through documents written decades ago.

Each Voyager is powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator containing plutonium, which gives off heat that is converted to electricity. As the plutonium decays, the heat output decreases and the Voyagers lose electricity. To compensate , the team turned off all nonessential systems and some once considered essential, including heaters that protect the still-operating instruments from the frigid temperatures of space. All five of the instruments that have had their heaters turned off since 2019 are still working, despite being well below the lowest temperatures they were ever tested at.

Recently, Voyager 1 began experiencing an issue that caused status information about one of its onboard systems to become garbled. Despite this, the system and spacecraft otherwise continue to operate normally, suggesting the problem is with the production of the status data, not the system itself. The probe is still sending back science observations while the engineering team tries to fix the problem or find a way to work around it.

“The Voyagers have continued to make amazing discoveries, inspiring a new generation of scientists and engineers,” said Suzanne Dodd, project manager for Voyager at JPL. “We don’t know how long the mission will continue, but we can be sure that the spacecraft will provide even more scientific surprises as they travel farther away from the Earth.”

More About the Mission

A division of Caltech in Pasadena, JPL built and operates the Voyager spacecraft. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/voyager

https://rps.nasa.gov/missions/12/voyager-1-2/

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August 18, 2022

Voyager, NASA's longest-lived mission, logs 45 years in space

by Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Voyager, NASA’s Longest-Lived Mission, Logs 45 Years in Space

NASA's twin Voyager probes have become, in some ways, time capsules of their era: They each carry an eight-track tape player for recording data, they have about 3 million times less memory than modern cellphones, and they transmit data about 38,000 times slower than a 5G internet connection.

Yet the Voyagers remain on the cutting edge of space exploration. Managed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, they are the only probes to ever explore interstellar space—the galactic ocean that our sun and its planets travel through.

The sun and the planets reside in the heliosphere, a protective bubble created by the sun's magnetic field and the outward flow of solar wind (charged particles from the sun). Researchers—some of them younger than the two distant spacecraft—are combining Voyager's observations with data from newer missions to get a more complete picture of our sun and how the heliosphere interacts with interstellar space.

"The heliophysics mission fleet provides invaluable insights into our sun, from understanding the corona or the outermost part of the sun's atmosphere, to examining the sun's impacts throughout the solar system, including here on Earth, in our atmosphere, and on into interstellar space," said Nicola Fox, director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "Over the last 45 years, the Voyager missions have been integral in providing this knowledge and have helped change our understanding of the sun and its influence in ways no other spacecraft can."

Voyager, NASA’s Longest-Lived Mission, Logs 45 Years in Space

The Voyagers are also ambassadors, each carrying a golden record containing images of life on Earth, diagrams of basic scientific principles, and audio that includes sounds from nature, greetings in multiple languages, and music. The gold-coated records serve as a cosmic "message in a bottle" for anyone who might encounter the space probes. At the rate gold decays in space and is eroded by cosmic radiation, the records will last more than a billion years.

Beyond expectations

Voyager 2 launched on Aug. 20, 1977, quickly followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5. Both probes traveled to Jupiter and Saturn, with Voyager 1 moving faster and reaching them first. Together, the probes unveiled much about the solar system's two largest planets and their moons. Voyager 2 also became the first and only spacecraft to fly close to Uranus (in 1986) and Neptune (in 1989), offering humanity remarkable views of—and insights into—these distant worlds.

While Voyager 2 was conducting these flybys, Voyager 1 headed toward the boundary of the heliosphere. Upon exiting it in 2012, Voyager 1 discovered that the heliosphere blocks 70% of cosmic rays, or energetic particles created by exploding stars. Voyager 2, after completing its planetary explorations, continued to the heliosphere boundary, exiting in 2018. The twin spacecraft's combined data from this region has challenged previous theories about the exact shape of the heliosphere.

Voyager, NASA’s Longest-Lived Mission, Logs 45 Years in Space

"Today, as both Voyagers explore interstellar space, they are providing humanity with observations of uncharted territory," said Linda Spilker, Voyager's deputy project scientist at JPL. "This is the first time we've been able to directly study how a star, our sun, interacts with the particles and magnetic fields outside our heliosphere , helping scientists understand the local neighborhood between the stars , upending some of the theories about this region, and providing key information for future missions."

The long journey

Over the years, the Voyager team has grown accustomed to surmounting challenges that come with operating such mature spacecraft, sometimes calling upon retired colleagues for their expertise or digging through documents written decades ago.

Each Voyager is powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator containing plutonium , which gives off heat that is converted to electricity. As the plutonium decays, the heat output decreases and the Voyagers lose electricity. To compensate, the team turned off all nonessential systems and some once considered essential, including heaters that protect the still-operating instruments from the frigid temperatures of space. All five of the instruments that have had their heaters turned off since 2019 are still working, despite being well below the lowest temperatures they were ever tested at.

Recently, Voyager 1 began experiencing an issue that caused status information about one of its onboard systems to become garbled. Despite this, the system and spacecraft otherwise continue to operate normally, suggesting the problem is with the production of the status data, not the system itself. The probe is still sending back science observations while the engineering team tries to fix the problem or find a way to work around it.

"The Voyagers have continued to make amazing discoveries, inspiring a new generation of scientists and engineers," said Suzanne Dodd, project manager for Voyager at JPL. "We don't know how long the mission will continue, but we can be sure that the spacecraft will provide even more scientific surprises as they travel farther away from the Earth."

Provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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NASA, California Institute of Technology, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Page Header Title

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News | July 28, 2023

Nasa mission update: voyager 2 communications pause.

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

UPDATE, Aug. 4, 2023: NASA has reestablished full communications with Voyager 2.

The agency’s Deep Space Network facility in Canberra, Australia, sent the equivalent of an interstellar “shout” more than 12.3 billion miles (19.9 billion kilometers) to Voyager 2, instructing the spacecraft to reorient itself and turn its antenna back to Earth. With a one-way light time of 18.5 hours for the command to reach Voyager, it took 37 hours for mission controllers to learn whether the command worked. At 12:29 a.m. EDT on Aug. 4, the spacecraft began returning science and telemetry data, indicating it is operating normally and that it remains on its expected trajectory.

UPDATE, Aug. 1, 2023: Using multiple antennas, NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) was able to detect a carrier signal from Voyager 2. A carrier signal is what the spacecraft uses to send data back to Earth. The signal is too faint for data to be extracted, but the detection confirms that the spacecraft is still operating. The spacecraft also continues on its expected trajectory. Although the mission expects the spacecraft to point its antenna at Earth in mid-October, the team will attempt to command Voyager sooner, while its antenna is still pointed away from Earth. To do this, a DSN antenna will be used to “shout” the command to Voyager to turn its antenna. This intermediary attempt may not work, in which case the team will wait for the spacecraft to automatically reset its orientation in October.

Once the spacecraft’s antenna is realigned with Earth, communications should resume.

A series of planned commands sent to NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft July 21 inadvertently caused the antenna to point 2 degrees away from Earth. As a result, Voyager 2 is currently unable to receive commands or transmit data back to Earth.

Voyager 2 is located more than 12.3 billion miles (19.9 billion kilometers) from Earth, and this change has interrupted communication between Voyager 2 and the ground antennas of NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN). Data being sent by the spacecraft is no longer reaching the DSN, and the spacecraft is not receiving commands from ground controllers.

Voyager 2 is programmed to reset its orientation multiple times each year to keep its antenna pointing at Earth; the next reset will occur on Oct. 15, which should enable communication to resume. The mission team expects Voyager 2 to remain on its planned trajectory during the quiet period.

Voyager 1, which is almost 15 billion miles (24 billion kilometers) from Earth, continues to operate normally.

A division of Caltech in Pasadena, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory built and operates the Voyager spacecraft. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/voyager

News Media Contact

Calla Cofield Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 626-808-2469 [email protected] 2023-103

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Nasa’s voyager team focuses on software patch, thrusters.

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Thruster Buildup

Patching things up, more about the mission, news media contact.

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

The efforts should help extend the lifetimes of the agency’s interstellar explorers.

Engineers for NASA’s Voyager mission are taking steps to help make sure both spacecraft, launched in 1977, continue to explore interstellar space for years to come.

One effort addresses fuel residue that seems to be accumulating inside narrow tubes in some of the thrusters on the spacecraft. The thrusters are used to keep each spacecraft’s antenna pointed at Earth. This type of buildup has been observed in a handful of other spacecraft.

The team is also uploading a software patch to prevent the recurrence of a glitch that arose on Voyager 1 last year. Engineers resolved the glitch , and the patch is intended to prevent the issue from occurring again in Voyager 1 or arising in its twin, Voyager 2.

The thrusters on Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are primarily used to keep the spacecraft antennas pointed at Earth in order to communicate. Spacecraft can rotate in three directions – up and down, to the left and right, and around the central axis, like a wheel. As they do this, the thrusters automatically fire and reorient the spacecraft to keep their antennas pointed at Earth.

Propellant flows to the thrusters via fuel lines and then passes through smaller lines inside the thrusters called propellant inlet tubes that are 25 times narrower than the external fuel lines. Each thruster firing adds tiny amounts of propellant residue, leading to gradual buildup of material over decades. In some of the propellant inlet tubes, the buildup is becoming significant. To slow that buildup, the mission has begun letting the two spacecraft rotate slightly farther in each direction before firing the thrusters. This will reduce the frequency of thruster firings.

The adjustments to the thruster rotation range were made by commands sent in September and October, and they allow the spacecraft to move almost 1 degree farther in each direction than in the past. The mission is also performing fewer, longer firings, which will further reduce the total number of firings done on each spacecraft.

The adjustments have been carefully devised to ensure minimal impact on the mission. While more rotating by the spacecraft could mean bits of science data are occasionally lost – akin to being on a phone call where the person on the other end cuts out occasionally – the team concluded the plan will enable the Voyagers to return more data over time.

Engineers can’t know for sure when the thruster propellant inlet tubes will become completely clogged, but they expect that with these precautions, that won’t happen for at least five more years, possibly much longer. The team can take additional steps in the coming years to extend the lifetime of the thrusters even more.

“This far into the mission, the engineering team is being faced with a lot of challenges for which we just don’t have a playbook,” said Linda Spilker, project scientist for the mission as NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. “But they continue to come up with creative solutions.”

In 2022, the onboard computer that orients the Voyager 1 spacecraft with Earth began to send back garbled status reports, despite otherwise continuing to operate normally. It took mission engineers months to pinpoint the issue . The attitude articulation and control system (AACS) was misdirecting commands, writing them into the computer memory instead of carrying them out. One of those missed commands wound up garbling the AACS status report before it could reach engineers on the ground.

The team determined the AACS had entered into an incorrect mode; however, they couldn’t determine the cause and thus aren’t sure if the issue could arise again. The software patch should prevent that.

“This patch is like an insurance policy that will protect us in the future and help us keep these probes going as long as possible,” said JPL’s Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager. “These are the only spacecraft to ever operate in interstellar space, so the data they’re sending back is uniquely valuable to our understanding of our local universe.”

Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 have traveled more than 15 billion and 12 billion miles from Earth, respectively. At those distances, the patch instructions will take over 18 hours to travel to the spacecraft. Because of the spacecraft’s age and the communication lag time, there’s some risk the patch could overwrite essential code or have other unintended effects on the spacecraft. To reduce those risks, the team has spent months writing, reviewing, and checking the code. As an added safety precaution, Voyager 2 will receive the patch first and serve as a testbed for its twin. Voyager 1 is farther from Earth than any other spacecraft, making its data more valuable.

The team will upload the patch and do a readout of the AACS memory to make sure it’s in the right place on Friday, Oct. 20. If no immediate issues arise, the team will issue a command on Saturday, Oct. 28, to see if the patch is operating as it should.

The Voyager mission was originally scheduled to last only four years, sending both probes past Saturn and Jupiter. NASA extended the mission so that Voyager 2 could visit Uranus and Neptune; it is still the only spacecraft ever to have encountered the ice giants. In 1990, NASA extended the mission again, this time with the goal of sending the probes outside the heliosphere, a protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun. Voyager 1 reached the boundary in 2012, while Voyager 2 (traveling slower and in a different direction than its twin) reached it in 2018.

A division of Caltech in Pasadena, JPL built and operates the Voyager spacecraft. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/voyager

Calla Cofield Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 626-808-2469 [email protected]

Related Terms

  • Voyager Program

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Beyond the Stars: The Enduring Legacy of NASA’s Voyager Mission

S pace enthusiasts received saddening news recently that NASA’s oldest operating spacecraft, Voyager 1, has started sending bad data transmissions, signifying what might be the end of the 46-year-old NASA craft.

Where the Sun’s Rays End

Voyager 1 left Earth on September 5, 1977, finally leaving our solar system in 2012. It would become a record-breaking spacecraft, becoming the most distant object with which humans have communicated. Its current location is some 15 billion miles away, way outside the heliosphere, where the sun’s magnetic reach ends.

The Voyager Program, which includes Voyager 1’s partner probe, Voyager 2, was meant to last five years, giving NASA valuable close-up data from our solar system. It has since closely examined Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, even discovering the first extraterrestrial volcanic activity on Saturn’s moon, Io.

The Golden Records

When the lone spacecraft first left Earth’s atmosphere, gasoline was $0.62 a gallon, while most families had no issues affording a house on one salary. Children at the time still remember the famous golden records with sounds of the Earth stored aboard both Voyager missions. The records were sent into deep space with instructions on the B-side for any alien lifeforms who might encounter the message.

Amazingly, the old binary code sent back to Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Altadena from Voyager 1’s dated instruments has been communicating flawlessly since 1981, when the last recorded glitch happened. In November, bad data began arriving from the lonely space probe and continues to come.

Keeping in Touch

What makes this sad decline more poignant is the skeleton crew of space enthusiasts still in contact with the plutonium-powered, smart car-sized space probe. A group of scientists operating from a small office space near a McDonald’s branch in Altadena, a Los Angeles County town north of Pasadena, Voyager 1’s birthplace.

The documentary It’s Quieter in the Twilight details how a group of rocket scientists keep the Voyager torch burning from their base. The Voyager project team started with roughly 200 members, now sitting at 12, and made up of people who mostly didn’t know the program was still operational.

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An aging project and team.

The fact that Voyager 1 has broken past the sun’s electromagnetic hold has been remarkable for what it taught astrophysicists about the shape of our heliosphere — name that for good reason. Had the brave little ship not made it this far, scientists would never have been able to know this.

Project manager Suzanne Dodd says in the film how most scientists charting Voyager’s journey are aging, so keeping track of the ship will be in a race against time — or against retirement — to keep Voyager 1 in contact. “It may be a race between how long we as individuals live,” says Dodd, “versus how long the spacecraft can still communicate with us.”

Coming to an End

NASA lists the Voyager project as having five major scientific purposes : magnetic field, low-energy charged particle, plasma, cosmic ray, and plasma wave investigations.

“The Voyager Interstellar Mission has the potential for obtaining useful interplanetary, and possibly interstellar, fields, particles, and waves science data until around the year 2020,” NASA explains, “when the spacecraft’s ability to generate adequate electrical power for continued science instrument operation will come to an end.”

For those dedicated professionals holding onto memories of their oldest spacecraft, they can at least retire with a smile, knowing Voyager 1 managed to keep sending data past its own retirement date — refusing to give up, which is something they will always have in common.

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Beyond the Stars: The Enduring Legacy of NASA’s Voyager Mission

Search Missions

Showing 1–12 of 160 results

Near-Earth Object Surveyor

An infrared space telescope designed to help advance NASA’s planetary defense efforts .

Launch date: September 2027

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

The Farside Seismic Suite

The Farside Seismic Suite will send two of the sensitive seismometers built for the InSight Mars mission to land on the far side of the Moon, where they will measure far side moonquakes and meteor impacts for the first time ever. .

Launch date: 2025

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

ASTHROS (short for Astrophysics Stratospheric Telescope for High Spectral Resolution Observations at Submillimeter-wavelengths) is a high-altitude balloon mission for studying astrophysical phenomena. .

Launch date: Dec. 1, 2024

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Europa Clipper

NASA's Europa Clipper will conduct detailed reconnaissance of Jupiter's moon Europa and investigate whether the icy moon could have conditions suitable for life. .

Launch date: October 2024

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

A trio of small rovers will work as a team to explore the Moon autonomously, mapping the subsurface in 3D, collecting distributed measurements, and showing the potential of multirobot missions. .

Launch date: 2024

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

The Psyche mission is a journey to a unique metal-rich asteroid orbiting the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. .

Launch date: Oct. 13, 2023

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Deep Space Optical Communications (DSOC)

The experiment will aim to demonstrate high-bandwidth communications in deep space for the first time. .

Launch date: Oct. 5, 2023

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Euclid will investigate the profound cosmic mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. .

Launch date: July 2023

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Lunar Trailblazer

NASA’s Lunar Trailblazer mission will provide new insights into the lunar water cycle. .

Launch date: 2023

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Surface Water and Ocean Topography

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth's surface water, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography, or SWOT, satellite will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. .

Launch date: Dec. 16, 2022

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Lunar Flashlight

Roughly the size of a briefcase, Lunar Flashlight is a very small satellite being developed and managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that will use near-infrared lasers and an onboard spectrometer to map ice in permanently shadowed regions near the Moon's south pole. .

Launch date: Dec. 11, 2022

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

Near Earth Asteroid Scout

NEA Scout is an exciting new mission that was recently selected by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) by a team from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Marshall Space Flight Center. .

Launch date: September 2022

jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

IMAGES

  1. Voyager

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  2. The Best of Voyager: The Longest-Running Space Mission in History

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  3. In the Emptiness of Space 14 Billion Miles Away, Voyager I Detects “Hum

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  4. Voyager, NASA's longest-lived mission, logs 45 years in space

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  5. What did we learn from the Voyager mission?

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  6. Voyager Mission Status Bulletins

    jet propulsion laboratory voyager mission status

VIDEO

  1. Awesome Airbus Voyager and F18 Formation Simulating Air to Air Refuelling

  2. Voyager and fighter jet fly over

  3. Jet Propulsion

COMMENTS

  1. Voyager

    Mission Status IMP MET Instrument Status Where are the Voyagers now? To learn more about Voyager, zoom in and give the spacecraft a spin. View the full interactive experience at Eyes on the Solar System. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

  2. Voyager

    12,667,961,126 mi 136.27943662 AU Voyager 2 Distance from Sun 12,595,928,643 mi 135.50452532 AU Voyager 2 One-Way Light Time 18:53:24 (hh:mm:ss) Voyager 2 Cosmic Ray Data Voyager 1 Distance from Earth 15,149,916,992 mi 162.97983014 AU Voyager 1 Distance from Sun 15,091,357,993 mi 162.34986393 AU

  3. Voyager

    And beyond. Status Science Timeline Spacecraft Interstellar Mission The mission objective of the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) is to extend the NASA exploration of the solar system beyond the neighborhood of the outer planets to the outer limits of the Sun's sphere of influence, and possibly beyond. › Learn more Planetary Voyage

  4. Voyager 1

    Current About the mission Voyager 1 reached interstellar space in August 2012 and is the most distant human-made object in existence. Launched just shortly after its twin spacecraft, Voyager 2, in 1977, Voyager 1 explored the Jovian and Saturnian systems discovering new moons, active volcanoes and a wealth of data about the outer solar system.

  5. Voyager, NASA's Longest-Lived Mission, Logs 45 Years in Space

    Managed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, they are the only probes to ever explore interstellar space - the galactic ocean that our Sun and its planets travel through.

  6. JPL Science: Voyager

    The twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are exploring where nothing from Earth has flown before. Continuing on their more-than-44-year journey since their 1977 launches, they each are much farther away from Earth and the sun than Pluto. In August 2012, Voyager 1 made the historic entry into interstellar space, the region between stars, filled with ...

  7. NASA Mission Update: Voyager 2 Communications Pause

    Calla Cofield Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 626-808-2469 [email protected] 2023-103 Once the spacecraft's antenna is realigned with Earth, communications should resume.

  8. Voyager, NASA's Longest-Lived Mission, Logs 45 Years in Space

    Launched in 1977, the twin Voyager probes are NASA's longest-operating mission and the only spacecraft ever to explore interstellar space. NASA's twin Voyager probes have become, in some ways, time capsules of their era: They each carry an eight-track tape player for recording data, they have about 3 million times less memory than modern ...

  9. Voyager

    The Voyager mission was designed to take advantage of a rare geometric arrangement of the outer planets in the late 1970s and the 1980s which allowed for a four-planet tour for a minimum of propellant and trip time.

  10. Voyager Mission Status Report

    PASADENA, CALIF. 91109. VOYAGER MISSION STATUS August 1, 1994 Both the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are healthy and they are continuing to take data on fields and particles in interplanetary space. The Voyager 2 spacecraft used two of its scientific instruments to look at the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

  11. Voyager 2 Returns to Normal Operations

    UPDATED on Feb. 5, 2020 Mission operators report that Voyager 2 continues to be stable and that communications between Earth and the spacecraft are good. The spacecraft has resumed taking science data, and the science teams are now evaluating the health of the instruments following their brief shutoff.

  12. Voyager 2

    Aug. 20, 1977 Type Flyby Spacecraft Target Interstellar Space Status Current About the mission The Voyager 2 spacecraft, which has been in operation since 1977 and is the only spacecraft to have ever visited Uranus and Neptune, has made its way to interstellar space, where its twin spacecraft, Voyager 1, has resided since August 2012.

  13. Voyager Mission Status Report

    Voyager Mission Status Report PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE JET PROPULSION LABORATORY CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PASADENA, CALIF. 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011 ... Voyager 1 is traveling at an average heliocentric velocity of 39,200 miles per hour and Voyager 2 is traveling at 36,200 miles per ...

  14. Voyager, NASA's longest-lived mission, logs 45 years in space

    Voyager, NASA's longest-lived mission, logs 45 years in space. This archival image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on March 23, 1977, shows engineers preparing the Voyager 2 spacecraft ...

  15. Voyager 2 News Updates

    August 15, 1989 News organizations planning coverage of Voyager 2's flyby of Neptune may wish to make note of the following telephone numbers which will be activated in late August. Mission status reports will be carried August 19-31 on special 900 phone line and two conventional phone lines.

  16. NASA's Voyager Will Do More Science With New Power Strategy

    NASA extended the mission so that Voyager 2 could visit Neptune and Uranus; it is still the only spacecraft ever to have encountered the ice giants. In 1990, NASA extended the mission again, this time with the goal of sending the probes outside the heliosphere. ... Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 626-808-2469 calla.e.cofield@jpl ...

  17. NASA Mission Update: Voyager 2 Communications Pause

    Calla Cofield Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 626-808-2469 [email protected] 2023-103

  18. Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is a federally funded research and development center in Pasadena, California, United States. Founded in 1936 by Caltech researchers, the laboratory is now owned and sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and administered and managed by the California Institute of Technology.. The laboratory's primary function is the construction ...

  19. NASA's Voyager Team Focuses on Software Patch, Thrusters

    In 2022, the onboard computer that orients the Voyager 1 spacecraft with Earth began to send back garbled status reports, despite otherwise continuing to operate normally. It took mission engineers months to pinpoint the issue.

  20. Beyond the Stars: The Enduring Legacy of NASA's Voyager Mission

    Amazingly, the old binary code sent back to Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Altadena from Voyager 1's dated instruments has been communicating flawlessly since 1981, when the last recorded ...

  21. NASA's Voyager Team Focuses on Software Patch, Thrusters

    Patching Things Up In 2022, the onboard computer that orients the Voyager 1 spacecraft with Earth began to send back garbled status reports, despite otherwise continuing to operate normally. It took mission engineers months to pinpoint the issue.

  22. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Instagram: "#OTD in 1986, Voyager 1

    3,201 likes, 15 comments - nasajpl on January 24, 2024: "#OTD in 1986, Voyager 1 was doing its closest flyby of Uranus - coming within 81,500 kilometers..." NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Instagram: "#OTD in 1986, Voyager 1 was doing its closest flyby of Uranus - coming within 81,500 kilometers (50,600 miles) of its cloud tops.

  23. Missions

    Missions Skip to search results Hide Filters Showing 1-12 of 160 results Target Earth (56) Mars (24) Moon (23) Stars and Galaxies (16) Asteroids and Comets (12) Exoplanets (9) Venus (6) Jupiter (4) Europa (3) Interstellar Space (2) Solar System (2) Sun (2) Deep Space (1) Mercury (1) Saturn (1) Status past (97) current (44) future (14) proposed (5)