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Tour de France: FAQs

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The Tour de France’s 109th edition covers a total distance of 3328 kilometers (2068 miles), making it the second-longest of the three Grand Tours in 2022, after the Giro d’Italia (3410.3 kilometers) (La Vuelta a Espana is the shortest at 3280.5km).

How long is each day of the Tour de France?

Nine flat stages, three hilly stages, seven mountain stages (including five summit finishes), two individual time trials, and two rest days make up the Tour de France. Every day, one stage is run, which spans around 225 kilometers and takes about five and a half hours to complete.

How do you win the Tour de France?

After 21 stages, the cyclist with the best overall time wins. Each day, a stage winner is determined by the first racer to cross the finish line.

How long is each race in Tour de France?

Each stage, or racing day, varies in length from 32 to 141 kilometers. The Tour’s itinerary varies from year to year, but certain iconic towns are always included.

Do Tour de France riders sleep?

On TV, you’ll frequently see them come to a halt en masse for a “nature break.” Then they’ll sleep at night because the phases are specified in length and they’ll all be staying in a hotel.

What was the longest Tour de France stage?

The longest Tour de France stage on record was the fifth stage in 1920, which was 482 kilometers (300 miles) long! Stages are currently averaging 175km / 109mi in length. Stage 3 is the longest this year, measuring 198 kilometers / 123 miles

What is a peloton?

The peloton, sometimes known as the “pack” or “bunch,” is the largest group of cyclists on the route. A rider consumes 30% less energy when riding in a group than when riding alone. A following peloton usually has the upper hand over a smaller escape group.

How many hours a day do Tour de France riders ride?

Feeding the world’s best riders during a Grand Tour is no easy task, with riders spending up to six hours a day on the bike with little time for recovery and only two rest days over the course of the event. “To fuel the journey riders need to consume an average of 5,000-plus calories per stage,” says one rider.

Are females allowed in the Tour de France?

The 2022 Tour de France Femmes, a widely anticipated new stage race for professional women, was announced at the event. From 2014 through 2021, the eight-day Tour de France Femmes will replace the single-day La Course by le Tour de France, which was conducted in various sites across France.

What is an echelon?

When the peloton is buffeted from the side, the riders form smaller angled formations to take advantage of each other’s draught. Echelons form a formation similar to that of flying geese, however the size of each echelon is regulated by the width of the road. In crosswinds, smart riders can employ echelons to put distance between themselves and their opponents.

What is a domestique?

A rider who puts his personal objectives aside in order to help his teammate. A domestique rides into the wind to protect his team leader, as well as carrying extra water bottles and snacks. If the leader suffers a puncture, the domestique has the option of abandoning his wheel or bicycle and waiting for the leader to rejoin the peloton.

What is the gruppetto?

During mountain stages, a group of riders forms towards the back of the race. They only ride fast enough to make the cutoff time for the day, which is based on a percentage of the winner’s time. Sprinters, wounded or sick cyclists, and riders wanting to conserve energy for the next day are frequently found in the gruppetto.

What is the purpose of the Publicity / PR caravan?

The PR caravan, a two-hour-before-the-race display of sponsor-emblazoned cars and floats, runs the entire route, handing away millions of souvenirs and sweets to the supporters along the way.

What is the fastest time for the Tour de France?

Rohan Dennis’ stage 1 of the 2015 Tour de France in Utrecht is the fastest time trial, with an average speed of 55.446 km/h (34.5 mph). In a team time-trial, the 2013 Orica GreenEDGE team won the quickest stage. At 57.7 km/h, they completed the 25 km time trial (35.85 mph).

How hard is Tour de France?

The Tour de France is often regarded as one of the world’s most arduous and tough sporting events. Cyclists strain their bodies to the limit for 21 stages over 23 days, day after day, after day, after day.

What is the race caravan?

The peloton is preceded and followed by a long line of team vehicles, broadcast and photographer motorcycles, and race official cars. Riders will return to team trucks for food, clothing, or mechanical assistance, and then slowly exit the vehicles to rejoin the peloton.

What is the broom wagon?

The vehicle that follows the Tour and “picks up” riders who drop out during a stage.

How do cyclists pee whilst racing the Tour de France?

Some cyclists prefer not to urinate on the bike, while others seek assistance in the form of a teammate pushing them from behind so they can maintain momentum while pedalling.

What is hors catégorie?

Climbs in the Tour de France are divided into categories based on their length, steepness, and location throughout the stage. The simplest is Category 4, which is usually less than 2 kilometers long. The most difficult climbs are referred to as “Hors Catégorie,” or “beyond categorization.” A climb is sometimes given this designation because of its vertical elevation rise or because it ends at the top.

How do professional female cyclists pee during a race?

Because many women’s races are under 5 hours, we normally pee 8 times right before the race and can hold it until the end if necessary. Other times, a rider will stop to potty and then get in the car to assist them in getting back. At least not on purpose, no woman pees herself while riding!

Can anyone ride the Tour de France?

Although the event is primarily for amateurs, it is available to anybody who is 18 years or older on race day. (Younger riders may enter with permission from their parents.) It is marketed to ‘amateurs,’ yet it also attracts potential and former professionals. It’s been ridden by Greg LeMond, Raymond Poulidor, and Miguel Induráin.

How fast do they go downhill in Tour de France?

To say the obvious, Tour de France riders are in excellent physical condition. They’re nearly twice as fit as the average non-Tour rider of the same age group who’s in fair to good form, according to the gold standard of cardiovascular fitness, V02 max (or how much oxygen your body can utilize per minute).

How fast do cyclist go in Tour de France?

The champion of the tour has averaged roughly 25 miles per hour (40 kilometers per hour) over the last few years–but that is throughout the entire tour. Everything is averaged at 25 mph, including uphill, downhill, time trial, and flatland. Weirdly, they’re a little speedier than we are. Quite a bit.

How much weight do Tour de France riders lose?

Van der Stelt explains that in the event of an emergency, the maximum weight loss would be 0.5kg. Though calorie burn and consumption vary by person, she claims the riders consume up to 8,000 calories a day – “taking on 10% extra every day, just in case,” she says, which can lead to weight gain.

What do Tour de France riders eat during race?

Riders may eat carbohydrate snacks such as bananas or protein bars while travelling. They’ll refuel with a mix of homemade rice cakes and tailored items like snacks and gels during the race.

What is Autobus?

Every stage of the Tour de France has a time limit, and on mountainous days, the autobus forms as non-climbers from all teams fight together to finish within the cut-off. The grupetto is another name for it.

What is Bidon?

A bidon is an abandoned water bottle, and many roadside fans will try to gather them as mementoes.

What is Breakaway?

During a stage, a small group of riders (or an individual) surge away from the main bunch.

What is bunch spirit?

Flatter stages usually end in a bunch sprint, which is a high-octane, hell-for-leather contest for stage honours between the peloton’s fastest sprinters.

Despite the fact that the race comes at the finish line in a group sprint, the stage win is decided by the sprinters and their lead-out riders.

What is Combativity award?

According to the race commissaires, this prize is given to the most aggressive rider each day.

The combativity award honors the rider who enlivened the stage by forming a breakaway, attacking frequently, or staying out in front of the pack for an extended period of time. The winner can be easily spotted the next day thanks to their red race numbers. At the conclusion of the race, an overall combativity medal is granted.

What is Feed zone?

Lunchtime. Every stage has its own feed zone, when riders slow down to collect musettes (small bags containing food and drinks) from their team soigneurs.

What is Flamme rouge?

A red air bridge marks the one-kilometer mark, beneath which a red kite flies.

What is General Classification?

After each stage, the riders’ finishing times are tallied. The riders are sorted by their total time, plus or minus any bonuses or penalties, in the general classification. The famed yellow jersey is worn by the cyclist who has completed the race in the least amount of time.

What is Grand Départ?

The ‘Big Beginning.’ Riders will begin the Grand Départ in Copenhagen this year 2022.

What is Grand Tour?

The Tour de France, Giro d’Italia, and Vuelta a Espana are cycling’s three most prestigious stage events, each lasting three weeks.

What is Intermediate sprint?​

Each stage has an intermediate sprint with points and prize money for the first riders across it, in addition to the finish line.

What is King of the Mountains?

The mountains classification, one of the Tour de France’s secondary prizes, ranks the first riders over each of the race’s classified climbs. The more difficult the climb, the more points are available for that climb. The King of the Mountains, who wears the polka-dot jersey, is the leader in the mountains classification.

What is Lanterne rouge?

The lanterne rouge is the final rider on the general classification, named after the red light attached on the back of a train.

What is Maillot jaune/yellow jersey?

The general classification leader wears the distinctive yellow jersey, or maillot jaune. Last year, the yellow jersey was won by Tadej Pogaar (UAE Team Emirates).

What is Maillot vert/green jersey?

The leader in the points classification is awarded the green shirt. Peter Sagan has won the sprinters’ classification seven times, owing to the fact that more points are available on flatter stages.

What is Maillot a pois/polka-dot jersey?

The leader of the mountains classification is awarded this characteristic white jersey with red polka-dots.

What is Maillot blanc/white jersey?​

The highest-placed young rider in the general classification wears the white jersey. This year’s youth classification is open to any riders born on or after January 1, 1996.

What is Musette?

A tiny cloth shoulder bag containing a rider’s food and extra bidons that is distributed in the feed zone.

What is Parcours?​

The race’s ‘course,’ or the route it will take.

What is Points classification?

Points are awarded to the top finishers in each stage and intermediate sprint, based on their position. These points are combined together to generate a points classification, with the green jersey worn by the leader.

What is Team time trial?​

This year, there will be no team time trial. The time of a team is determined when the fifth rider crosses the finish line.

What is Time trial?

Individual time trials will be held on stages 5 and 20 of this year’s Tour de France, totalling 58 kilometres between them – the most kilometres against the clock since 2013.

Riders set off on specialised time trial bikes in reverse general classification order with the goal of finishing the stage in the shortest time.

Individual time trials, termed the “race of truth,” can cause significant shifts in overall classification. A time trial will be held on the Tour’s penultimate stage, as it was last year, and it might determine who wears the yellow jersey on the final day and rides into Paris as the victor.

What is a Rouleur?

A rouleur is an all-rounder and often one of the hardest riders in the peloton, capable of excelling on a variety of terrains and making a superb domestique.

What is a Soigneur?​

The soigneur is the unsung hero of a team’s backroom staff, in charge of looking after cyclists off the bike and handing out musettes, bidons, and extra layers of clothing during the race.

What is Sprinter?

On the flatter stages, sprinters battle it out with their peloton counterparts, capable of remarkable bursts of acceleration over short distances.

What is a Sprint Train?​

Before a group sprint, sprint trains form, with teammates offering a wheel for their sprinter to follow through the pandemonium.

The lead-out guy will be at the rear of the train, with the team’s sprinter on his wheel, ready to dash for the finish as soon as possible.

What is a Team Classification?

The team classification system assigns a score to each team based on the total time of their top three finishers on each stage. Yellow helmets are sometimes worn by team classification leaders to help them stand out in the peloton.

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2022 Tour de France: How Time Has Evolved The Tour

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How Long Is the Tour de France?

The 2023 course has some big climbs and surprise locations.

109th tour de france 2022 stage 14

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The Tour de France is cycling’s most well-known stage race, taking place over the course of three weeks. This year’s race starts on Saturday, July 1, 2023 through Sunday, Jul 23, 2023. A truly international race, this year’s event will begin in Bilbao, Spain, although it will, as it traditionally does, on the Champs-Élysées in Paris.

To that point, the race course is different every year. This summer, the riders will travel 3,404 kilometers, or just a few feet over 2,115 miles, according to the Amaura Sport Organisation (ASO), which announced the route in October 2022.

Remember, the United States is one of the few places that uses miles to measure distance so when you watch coverage, remember to “think metric.” One kilometer is equal to .621 miles. A 5K, for example, is 3.2 miles.

In other words, it’s not just the length of the course that’s challenging, but the terrain. This year’s race, many feel, is “for climbers.” There are also time trials to test the cyclists’ abilities.

How long is the average Tour de France?

The Tour de France is always three weeks long and typically split into 21 stages—days of riding—with one or two rest days. Depending on how the dates are organized, though, some years it’s been only 20 stages, while other years have had as many as 25 stages. The first two Tours in the early 1900s only had six stages.

The total mileage of the 21 stages combined tends to hover around 2,200 miles, which averages to around 100 miles of racing most days .

le tour de france 2023 route map

Is every stage the same length?

Not at all! Stages in the Tour de France vary wildly in length. Some days involve 180-plus mile long races while others are 30-miles fast and furious. The styles of racing also change: There are individual time trials, team time trials, and standard road races that take place with a mass start. Here are the stages of the 2023 Tour .

What’s the shortest Tour de France stage?

Since the entire course changes each year, so do the lengths of the stages. In 1988, the second shortest race of the modern era (2,042 miles) also had the shortest time trial and flat stage. The one-kilometer individual time trial from the prologue of the 1988 Tour de France is the shortest race ever run during the Tour. Guido Bontemp won it in 1 minute and 14 seconds. The 1988 race also contained the shortest flat stage at 23.6 miles. Adri van der Poel won that stage in 46 minutes and 36 seconds. Ardent cycling fans might recognize Adri as the father of multi-time cyclocross world champion, road and mountain bike superstar Mathieu van der Poel .

What was the shortest Tour de France?

Depends on what you mean by the shortest! The second Tour de France ever run—back in 1904—was only six stages long—but it covered 1,483 miles, so some stages lasted for nearly a full day. In the last two decades, the shortest Tour was in 2002 and covered 2,035 miles across 20 stages.

What was the longest Tour de France?

That would be the 1926 Tour de France, which covered 3,569 miles in an attempt to ride around the border of France... but close behind that is the 1919 Tour de France, which also has the dubious honor of being the slowest Tour de France in miles-per-hour.

Despite the fact that it was almost 200 miles shorter than the 1926 route, it was only a few hours faster in overall ride time for the winner. It also had the longest one-day stage—265 miles—and it reportedly took the winner almost 19 hours to complete it. That year’s Tour also only had 10 finishers out of 69 starters, the lowest number of Tour finishers ever. Yes, 1919 was rough.

What about elevation gain?

Remember, a lot of the stages of the Tour de France go up and down mountains, so not only are riders contending with 100-plus mile days in the saddle, they’re climbing thousands of feet in the process. In 2020, one stage included 14,435 feet of climbing over the course of 118 miles. That's a half-Everest in a single stage.

How fast do riders go?

In recent years, the average speed has hovered around 24.8 miles per hour (40 kilometers per hour), though it changes a bit from year to year depending on the riders, the elevation gain, the temperature, and the length of the stages. But it stays fairly close to that 25 MPH speed.

Molly writes about cycling, nutrition and training, with an emphasis on women in sport. Her new middle-grade series, Shred Girls, debuts with Rodale Kids/Random House in 2019 with "Lindsay's Joyride." Her other books include "Mud, Snow and Cyclocross," "Saddle, Sore" and "Fuel Your Ride." Her work has been published in magazines like Bicycling, Outside and Nylon. She co-hosts The Consummate Athlete Podcast.

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Tour de France 2021 route: When does each stage start and how can I follow live on TV?

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Tour de France 2021 route: When does each stage start and how can I follow live on TV?

What is this race and why should I care about it?

Why, it's only the 108th edition of the Tour de France , one of the three grand tours, the others being the Giro d'Italia and  Vuelta a España .

Founded in 1903 by Henri Desgrange, editor of  L'Auto  newspaper, the Tour may not be the favourite stage race of the cycling cognoscenti but it is one that captures the imagination of the wider sporting public. As a result, the race is the biggest annual sporting event in the world with more live spectators than even the Olympics or football World Cup.

When did the Tour de France start?

The Tour de France got under way in Brittany on Saturday June 26, 2021 , with the 197.8-kilometre opening stage from Brest to Landerneau.

How long is this year's Tour de France?

The total distance of the race is 3,414.4 kilometres – or 2,121.6 miles in old money. After setting off from Brest, the Brittany region hosts the opening four stages that will favour the puncheurs and sprinters of the peloton.

Tour de France 2021 map

The first of the two individual time trial stages come on day five of the Tour, the 27km course running from Changé to Laval, before three days later the riders enter the high mountains for the first time in 2021.

Throughout the three-week race there are just three summit finishes – Tignes (stage 9), Col du Portet (stage 17) and Luz Ardiden (stage 18) – though there are plenty of chances for opportunists to main gains on the descents, most notably off Le Grand Bornand (stage eight) and during stage 11 when Mont Ventoux will be tackled twice on the same day before a breakneck dash towards the finish in the Provençal town of Malaucène.

For the sprinters and those targeting the points jersey, there are no fewer than seven stages that will suit their strengths, while the final, potentially decisive time trial, comes on the penultimate day of the race.

And when does the Tour de France finish?

The race concludes a little over three weeks after setting off from Brest with the largely processional 21st stage from into Paris on Sunday July 18.

Where does each stage start and end?

How can i follow the race.

Those with subscriptions to Eurosport or GCN+ are in luck, both will be broadcasting every day, as will be Welsh terrestrial channel S4C which is available on Sky 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166 in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and on iPlayer and ITV with all channels showing their live and highlights programmes at different times each day.

Alternatively, if you are stuck at work or do not subscribe to Eurosport or GCN+ then you can follow the action, as it unfolds, right here with  Telegraph Sport . Each of the 21 stages will be live blogged by our team – full details to follow – while every evening our analysis will be published with selected details and standings in the main classifications.

What teams will ride the Tour de France?

As with all WorldTour races, each of the 19 teams that make up the top-flight of professional cycling receive an invite and in the case of the Tour de France, all teams are contracted to race the second grand tour of 2021.

  • Tour de France: Full list of squads and remaining riders

In addition to the WorldTeams, Alpecin-Fenix qualified as the No 1 ranked ProTeam from 2020 while race organisers ASO handed wild card entries to Arkéa-Samsic, B&B Hotels p/b KTM and Total Direct Énergie.

How to watch live TV coverage and follow the race

All dates, times and distances are correct at time of publishing. 

Saturday June 26

Stage one:   Brest to Landerneau, 197.8km

how long until tour de france

Stage starts at:  11.30am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.45am-4.45pm, ITV 10.45am-4.30pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8.30-9.30pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9-9.30pm

Sunday June 27

Stage two: Perros-Guirec to Mûr-de-Bretagne, 183.5km

how long until tour de france

Stage starts at:  12.20pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 12.15-5.10pm, ITV 1-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Monday June 28

Stage three: Lorient to Pontivy, 182.9km

Tour de France 2021, stage three - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.20pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.50am-5.05pm, ITV 1-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9.30-10pm

Tuesday June 29

Stage four: Redon to Fougères, 150.4km

Tour de France 2021, stage four - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.40pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 12.05-4.30pm, ITV 1-4.30pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Wednesday June 30

Stage five: Changé to Laval, 27.2km – time trial

Tour de France 2021, stage five - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.15am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.55am-4.55pm, ITV 2-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9.30-10pm

Thursday July 1

Stage six : Tours to Châteauroux, 160.6km

Tour de France 2021, stage six  - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  1.05pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 12.35-5.05pm, ITV 2-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Friday July 2

Stage seven : Vierzon to Le Creusot, 249.1km

Tour de France 2021, stage seven - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  10.15am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 9.40am-4.50pm, ITV 2-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9.30-10pm

Saturday July 3

Stage eight : Oyonnax to Le Grand-Bornand, 150.8km

Tour de France 2021, stage eight - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.15pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 12.15pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.50am-4.50pm, ITV 12-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9-9.30pm

Sunday July 4

Stage nine : Cluses to Tignes, 144.9km

Tour de France 2021, stage nine - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.10pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 12.15-5.25pm, ITV 12-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Tuesday July 6 

Stage 10 : Albertville to Valence, 190.7km

Tour de France 2021, stage 10 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.20pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.45am-5.05pm, ITV 1-5pm, S4C TBC  Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Wednesday July 7

Stage 11 : Sorgues to Malaucène, 198.9km

Tour de France 2021, stage 11 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.15am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.40am-5.05pm, ITV 12-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10.05-10.35pm

Thursday July 8

Stage 12 : Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux to Nîmes, 159.4km

Tour de France 2021, stage 12 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.50pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 12.50pm  Live:  Eurosport1 12.10-4.50pm, ITV 1.4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Friday July 9

Stage 13 : Nîmes to Carcassonne, 219.9km

Tour de France 2021, stage 13 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.15am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.45am-5pm, ITV 1-5pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9.30-10pm

Saturday July 10

Stage 14 : Carcassonne to Quillan, 183.7km

Tour de France 2021, stage 14 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.40am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.05am-4.30pm, ITV 11.15am-4.15pm, S4C From 3.15pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9-9.30pm

Sunday July 11

Stage 15 : Céret to Andorra la Vella (Andorra), 191.3km

Tour de France 2021, stage 15 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.30am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 11am-5.15pm, ITV 11.15am-5.15pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Tuesday July 13

Stage 16 : El Pas de la Casa (Andorra) to Saint-Gaudens, 169km

Tour de France 2021, stage 16 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.30pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.45am-5.05pm, ITV 1-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Wednesday July 14

Stage 17 : Muret to Saint-Lary-Soulan (Col du Portet), 178.4km

Tour de France 2021, stage 17 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.10am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 12.45pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.35am-4.35pm, ITV 10.45am-4.30pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Thursday July 15 

Stage 18 : Pau to Luz Ardiden, 129.7km

Tour de France 2021, stage 18 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.50pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 12.50pm Live:  Eurosport1 12.15-5pm, ITV 1-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Friday July 16

Stage 19 : Mourenx to Libourne, 207km

Tour de France 2021, stage 19 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  11.30am (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1pm Live:  Eurosport1 10.55am-4.50pm, ITV 1-4.45pm, S4C From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 9.30-10pm

Saturday July 17

Stage 20 : Libourne to Saint-Émilion, 30.8km – time trial

Tour de France 2021, stage 20 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  12.05pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 1.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 11.45am-5.25pm, ITV 3-5.15pm, S4C Clic player From 2pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 7-8pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

Sunday July 18

Stage 21 : Chatou to Paris (Champs-Élysées), 108.4km

Tour de France 2021, stage 21 - Tour de France 2021 route: When does it start and how can I follow each stage live on TV?

Stage starts at:  3.30pm (BST) Telegraph Sport  liveblog: 3.30pm Live:  Eurosport1 2.55-7.15pm, ITV 4-7pm, S4C From 3pm Highlights: Eurosport1 8-9pm, ITV 9-10pm, S4C 10-10.30pm

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Getting Ready for the Tour de France

Getting Ready for the Tour de France

How do the pros prepare for one of the hardest races in cycling? The 109 th edition of the Tour de France is just around the corner and professional riders are putting the finishing touches on their year long journey to the pinnacle of cycling. What do they train in each of the distinct training stages leading up to the Tour? Let’s take a closer look.

Tour de France 2022

This year’s Tour will span 3328 km inside the classic 21 days of racing. There will be 6 mountain stages, 2 individual time-trials, and plenty of flat stages for breakaways and exciting sprint finishes. Stage 7 will be the longest with 220 km while stage 11 will take riders to the highest point at the top of Col du Galibier, a breath taking 2607 metres above sea level. If last year is anything to go by, then the winner will be expected to maintain an average speed of 41,17 kilometres per hour over nearly 83 hours of racing. It’s clear that every competitor will have to be in the shape of their life.

😍Ahead of the #TDF2022 Grand Départ from Denmark, @Letour is meeting the "golden generation" of Danish cycling Today: 🇩🇰 @Mads_Pedersen ⤵ pic.twitter.com/F6tVUkcEHj — Tour de France™ (@LeTour) June 22, 2022

It takes the whole season

Competing at the Tour de France is the highlight of every cyclist’s season, if not their whole career. That’s why most pros plan their season with the main goal to peak just as the Tour kicks off. The preparation often starts around 7 months before the Tour and includes several training macro-cycles. They will be building an aerobic base, adding high-intensity, doing race-specific training, and tapering. Let’s take a closer look at each of these training stages.

Building a base

The Tour is set to start on the 1 st of July which means that most rider initiated their base-building phase late November or early December of last year. Their main focus is on long, low-intensity rides to build up the basic aerobic endurance required. It also includes some flexibility and strength training on top of that. The riders typically do something like 20-30 hours of training each week.

Adding intensity

Come February, or about 5 months before the start of the Tour, cyclists start adding more tempo, sub-threshold, and threshold rides. Threshold tempo is the hardest effort that you can sustain for an hour which means they will be spending more and more time at high intensity. This training phase is also where they start working on their nutrition on and off the bike. They need to get used to consuming a lot of food on the bike. Their digestion needs to be conditioned to handle up to 90 g of carbs per hour while cycling.

This is also the time when the pros start to peak with their body weight. They start early because steady weight loss is the best way to avoid sacrificing performance. There is a general rule of thumb that they shouldn’t lose more than 0,5 % of their bodyweight per week.

Race-specific training

Right around the beginning of April, Tour competitors will refocus on race-specific training. They will reduce their strength work and use actual races as some of their training. There is no substitute to racing. Certain skills can only be gained while amidst a race. The Ardennes Classics or the Giro D’Italia are often used for this purpose.

This is also the time when cyclists include training camps. These are typically 10-day training blocks of structured cycling where every day is planned out. Training camps often include altitude training and adapting to riding in the heat. The specific schedule depends on the type of rider. Climbers will spend more time in the mountains doing lots of long, steady climbs while others might work on high-intensity speedwork elsewhere.

Tapering means reducing training load to be fresh at the starting line. During this process riders will go from riding 5-6 hours a day to riding about 1 hour or not at all. About 2 weeks before the Tour, riders will start shortening their training blocks and adding ample rest in between. They would do their last long ride the weekend before the Tour. There might be a short speed workout mid-week to practice bursts of power and picking up pedalling cadence. They will also have a session on the time trial bikes during the last week.

They take recovery as seriously as training

A crucial part of getting ready for the Tour de France is recovery. It’s present in every phase of training and riders know that they can’t cut any corners there. Recovery is a continuous process that includes post-ride shakes, massages, stretches, and quality sleep. Especially sleep is what most professionals focus on as the bedrock of recovery. They go to bed and wake up at the same time, sleep in a cool and dark room, and avoid blue light an hour before sleep.

The riders give it a better part of a year to get ready for the Tour, let’s cheer them on as they compete for glory on this 21-stage Grand Tour!

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Epic Road Rides

Watching the Tour de France in person: essential tips for following the Tour de France!

Watching the Tour de France in person is a magical experience. The Tour is the most famous cycling event in the world and you get the chance to experience the electric atmosphere and history being made in front of your eyes.

Yes, the television coverage and aerial shots of chateaus, mountains and charming villages are fantastic, but being on the ground is something else. Following the Tour de France and spectating it live is something special.

Epic Road Rides reader, Ben Davies, knows quite a bit about this – he’s planned trips for him and his friends to spectate the Tour de France every year since 2016. He has kindly written this DIY Tour de France bike tour/spectator guide to help make it easier for anyone wanting to do the same.

Ben says: “My first year following the Tour was spent chasing my tail around France due to being “over enthusiastic” in my estimation of what was involved. I hope my mistakes will help me to assist so you can avoid the same pitfalls!”.

So without further ado, here’s Ben’s Tour de France spectator guide. Enjoy!

If you’re looking for an organised tour to watch the Tour de France, read this in-depth article .

1. How do you decide which stages of the Tour de France to watch in person?

My usual starting point is to look at the route map and the location of the stages.  I look for a number of stages that are close to a central location in order to avoid too much travel.

From there I look for well known places and try and plan a cycle route for us taking in “icons” and as much of each stage as we can get away with (before getting booted off the course – more on that below !).

We’ve watched everything from a Grand Depart to flat sprint stages and stages in the high mountains too – but these days we tend to miss out long flat stages as there’s not a lot of action. The peloton comes past at a rate of knots so you don’t get to see a great deal.

Most week-long trips would allow you to fit in each type of stage, though our favourites are the mountains. You can get close to the action, test yourself out with the riding and get enough time to see the riders pass slowly enough to pick individual favourites out. The publicity caravan also passes slowly enough to give more chance of being able to pick up some Tour souvenirs (AKA “Tour tat”)!

One of my top tips is to think about the riders’ rest days. For example, last year I did a bit of research in the Roadbook (more info below ) and found the various hotels the teams were allocated. I decided Mr Cavendish and team Di Data would benefit from our company the following day.  We got up early and went by the team hotel to check things out.  After a chat with the mechanics, who were busy working on the bikes, we discovered the guys would be setting off around 10:00am on a “spin”.  After some breakfast we made our way back to the hotel car park and joined the team for a ride round Lake Annecy – spectacular!  We also saw Movistar and AG2R out with groups of fans too. This was one of my favourite days ever on a bike!

A note of warning: if you do this, use your common sense. Give the riders room to do what they are there to do – ride.  Don’t get in their group or too close as they don’t want you to be responsible for a crash. Don’t be too pushy and pester them for selfies and autographs. When the moment looks right, then ask, preferably either at the start or end, not whilst they are taking a nature break (as someone did when we were there…)!

Chris Froome cycling the Tour de France 2016

2. What’s the best way of getting to the Tour from the UK?

Travelling across the Channel to France can be fairly cheap especially on the more unpopular timed crossings. However, be warned: the ferry companies often seem to raise the prices when the Tour is on as they know more people will want to cross.  Book early!

I use https://www.aferry.com/ to book crossings as soon as the dates/routes/plan becomes clear.

For planning your trip across France, ViaMichelin gives cost options and alternative routes for specific vehicles.

3. How do you find out detailed information on each Tour de France stage?

I always download the “Official Roadbook” (the one issued to the teams) that becomes available on the Velorooms website .

The Roadbook shows profiles, timings, road closures, team hotels – the lot!  It’s a fantastic resource.

I usually print off the pages for the week we’re doing and take the relevant pages each day so I can refer back to them regarding locations and times etc.

4. How do you decide where to stay?

Once I’ve decided how long we’ve got and what area we want to focus on, I try to find a few possible locations spread over a few days of the Tour being in the particular area.

I use Google maps try and make sure the location to park the motorhome and base ourselves in is central to the routes we’re going to watch.  I use www.searchforsites.co.uk which is a specific motorhome parking app to search for recommended parking spots for the motorhome. However, during the Tour, I’ve found most towns and villages are very relaxed about parking presumably as they know you’re not going to be there too long.

I’ve previously parked in sports centres, supermarket and railway station car parks with no problems at all. I’ve been welcomed into strangers’ houses and even joined a village street party (at their request) to celebrate the Tour passing through that day. It was great – we were fed and plied with beer/wine!

Of course, if you’re not in a motorhome it’ll still be a similar process: you’ll be looking for accommodation that’s central to the stages you want to watch.

Example: in 2018, we drove from Calais down to Annecy for the Tour’s rest day there (more on rest days  above !). From there, a central point somewhere near Annecy around Albertville and Bourg St Maurice worked well, giving us opportunities to ride out to each day’s route, take in a climb or two and catch a start and a finish whilst not needing to move the motorhome between stages. It meant we could enjoy cycling each day, usually taking in as much of the route as we could, and avoid too much travelling.

Don’t do what I did in my first year spectating the Tour de France. Due to bad motorhome positioning, we ended up travelling each night until after midnight trying to catch the next day’s stage.  After watching the stage, we had to cycle back, wash, change, load the bikes and travel hundreds of miles plus try and eat somewhere along the way! It wasn’t much fun!

Small town on the Tour de France route perfect for spectating

5. How do you find accommodation and bike hire for your Tour de France spectator tour?

If you’re not in a motorhome, be aware that hotels and guest houses will get booked up very quickly once the route details are released by the organisers around October of the preceding year. This is particularly the case in the mountains and especially where the area you want to go is where the Etape du Tour is also being held.

In terms of bike hire, we’ve always taken our own bikes, but I’ve had friends who tried to hire bikes at Mt Ventoux over a Tour de France weekend and found they were sold out until the day after (when there were plenty available!). Admittedly this was an extremely busy location, but I think most places get booked up quickly when the Tour is in town. Again, book early!

6. How do you get to the Tour de France route on the day?

My advice is to cycle to the route and along as much of it as possible in order to scout out the best place to watch from (more on this below ).

I’ve found advertised Tour de France road closures are usually not too strict for cycling to your chosen viewpoint as they are meant for motor vehicles. That said, there are some very over-enthusiastic gendarmes that won’t let you past their posts once the “fermée” or “route barée” time kicks in.  They usually shout “pied” (walk) which we do until out of sight before hopping back on and continuing (if safe to do so) for as far as we can… Obviously we stay vigilant and if we hear any sirens, traffic or the caravan is near we dismount and get out of the way immediately.

At the summit of the HC Col du Pre

7. Do you have any tips for picking your spot to spectate the stage?

Places on iconic climbs such as Mt Ventoux, Alpe d’Huez etc get filled up very quickly, especially near the finish line.

We generally aim to ride as much of the climb/route as possible early on whilst looking for good viewpoints, bars, cafés or any vantage points (rocky outcrops or overlooking gardens etc) that would be good as the peloton passes.

It’s then fairly easy to drop back down to our chosen spot on that day’s route once we’ve completed as much of the route as we can. The beauty of having the bikes is that if our chosen spot turns out not to be good enough then we can move on to another option.

Check the Roadbook. For example, the “feed zone” offers a different experience of the Tour and a chance to chat with soigneurs and watch them interact with their teams. Feed zones also have areas where bidons are to be thrown away by the riders. Sometimes they’re not that busy meaning there’s plenty of bidons to go around.  The soigneurs sometimes have “spare” bidons and musettes that the riders didn’t or couldn’t take whilst in the zone.  Often, they’re not interested in carting them about or won’t get another chance to pass them to their riders, so will hand them out once the peloton has passed.

Another thing to look out for is if the route does a loop and this will allow you to see the peloton in action more than once. For example you watch from point A then as they cycle more of the loop you can use the Roadbook to check the times and cycle to point B to catch them again.

Also look out for large car parks at a depart/arrivee village.  These are often used to stock up the caravan with goodies and provide a great opportunity to blag some swag.

Avoid the crowds.

If a stage finishes on top of a mountain there is sometimes no access for the team coaches/trucks who are left at the foot of the climbs. The riders have to make their own way back down to the coaches by cycle – blowing their whistles so the crowds part – and it’s quite easy to wait a while and join them as they make their way back down.  We’ve ridden down off Planche des Belles Filles chatting with various stars – very memorable!

Spectators watching the Tour de France in person

8. What time should you get in position to watch the Tour come through?

This depends on how busy the location is. For example, Alpe d’Huez fills up from first thing in the morning, whilst lesser known stages are easy to get a spot on up to about an hour before the peloton comes through.

Occasionally we have been blocked by gendarmes and have been made to stay exactly where they say, but even then we’ve managed to move around a bit and found a better spot.

9. What should you take with you each day?

This depends on the length of your ride and what’s on route. Use Google Earth to do a bit of research beforehand and decide on supplies for your day.

There is normally a village of some sorts near to viewpoints where supplies can be bought, as well as local entrepreneurs that set up pop-up snack bars. However obviously they cannot be totally relied upon, so we also usually take some extra sandwiches and a few cans of pop/water in a rucksack which is replaced with Tour stuff (see below ) as the day progresses.

Make sure to take a bag or rucksack to put all your “Tour tat” in! They they throw loads out as the caravan passes through and everybody loves a madeleine or an LCL branded cap, right?!

Collection of items picked up on the Tour de France route after watching the Tour in person

10. Do you have any tips for how to be a good Tour de France spectator and make the most of your day?!

We’ve all seen the videos and pictures of spectators causing crashes whilst watching the Tour. The following “rules” should help make sure you don’t get caught up in disaster.

  • Don’t swing on or lean too far over the barriers. Riders passing close can get caught up in disaster this way.
  • Don’t leave it until the last minute to step back from your “brilliant” vantage point directly in front of an approaching rider.  Someone may be stood directly behind you; next thing you’re all on the tarmac. Not the best way to get your face on TV!
  • Be careful of camera straps, rucksacks and bags that may get caught, tripping you (and maybe the yellow jersey) up.
  • Take all your litter home, including gel wrappers, or find a convenient bin/bag to place them in.
  • Smoke bombs and flares… Really. Just don’t even think about it.

On a more positive note, I’d also suggest not spending too much time focusing (get it?!) on your pictures/videos. The peloton passes quickly in most places and if you’re concentrating on getting images then you’ll miss them. There’s always chance for a few snaps, just try not to miss the main event!

Once the peloton, and more specifically the “broom wagon”, has gone through there will be a car with a flashing headboard telling you the road is re-opened. At this point you’re free to cycle away. Beware that the roads can be very busy and there are plenty trying to imitate the descending skills of their heroes, though usually nowhere near as good!

Team car on the Tour de France route

11. Any final thoughts?

Don’t forget that the Tour will only take in certain climbs in certain areas that you may be in too.

For example, it’s a shame to be on the doorstep of the Ballon d’Alsace and only go up Planche des Belles Filles. So do some research in the area you plan to visit and maybe even take a day off from the Tour to tick off some bucket list adventures.

Epic Road Rides gives great information (the France cycling guides are all here ) and suggestions on various routes in your chosen area but www.cyclingcols.com and www.cycling-challenge.com can also be useful resources.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this short guide and that it helps you avoid some of our early mistakes.  If you would like any further information, then please just ask in the comments below.  Safe travels and enjoy your trip!

Big thanks to Ben for all his Tour de France tips! There are some really useful pointers in here and we hope you use them to have a fantastic trip!

Have you planned a DIY Tour de France spectator tour?

Have you got some tips for watching the Tour de France in person?

Any questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

And finally, if you want to go on a supported tour to watch the Tour de France, where all the planning is done for you, read this article .

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Ben Davies

Ben Davies is an Epic Road Rides reader who also runs Velomoho He got in touch to tell us about his Cinglés du Ventoux trip and his frequent trips to watch the Tour de France (check out the separate article on that here).

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How to Watch the Tour de France

The world’s greatest cyclists journey across France in the biggest race of the year and Peacock is the only place to see it all.

Cyclists pass the Arc du Triomphe in the Tour de France

It’s time for cycling’s most anticipated event of the year. The Tour de France brings the best professional cyclists in the world together for a three-week cross-country race. The route is different every year, but the destination remains the same: A grand finish on Paris’ Champs-Elysées. No other competition is quite like it. Even if you don’t normally follow professional cycling, you’ll find yourself drawn in, captivated by the 21-day drama on display. If you want to see it all, there’s one place you need to be. 

What Is the Tour de France? 

The Tour de France is a massive bike race that takes cyclists on a three-week journey through France. With the exact route changing every year, this is a unique challenge unlike anything else on the cycling calendar. The race is broken up into stages, with each day covering a certain portion of the route. Each stage has its own winner, and the winner of the entire event is the person who has the fastest time of all 21 stages. Every stage matters. Even winning one, even if the rider doesn’t win the tournament, will boost that rider’s standing significantly. Only the absolute best, most competitive riders make it to the Tour de France, so tensions are high for the entire three-week race. 

This year’s event will take 176 riders through 3,404 km of road, hill, and mountain terrain. Multiple stages will force cyclists to climb for more than an hour straight. It’s a tough route that encourages athletes to take risks to get ahead. This year’s edition of the Tour de France is sure to be the most memorable yet. 

When Can I Watch Each Stage of the Tour de France 

If you want to see it all live, you’ll have to set an alarm. Each stage starts early in the morning for those of us in the U.S. Check out the schedule below. 

July 1 at 6:30a ET: Stage 1 – Bilbao  

July 2 at 6a ET: Stage 2 – Vitoria-Gasteiz to Saint Sébastien 

July 3 at 6:30a ET: Stage 3 – Amorebieta-Etxano to Bayonne 

July 4 at 6:30a ET: Stage 4 – Dax to Nogaro 

July 5 at 6:30a ET: Stage 5 – Pau to Laruns 

July 6 at 6:30a ET: Stage 6 – Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque 

July 7 at 7a ET: Stage 7 – Mont de Marsan to Bordeaux 

July 8 at 6a ET: Stage 8 – Libourne to Limoges 

July 9 at 7a ET: Stage 9 – Saint Léonard de Noblat to Puy de Dôme 

July 10: Rest Day – No Coverage 

July 11 at 6:30a ET: Stage 10 – Vulcania to Issoire 

July 12 at 6:30a ET: Stage 11 – Clermont-Ferrand to Moulins 

July 13 at 6:30a ET: Stage 12 – Roanne to Belleville en Beaujolais 

July 14 at 7a ET: Stage 13 – Châtillo sur Chalaronne to Grand Colombier 

July 15 at 6:30a ET: Stage 14 – Annemasse to Morzine le Portes du Soleil 

July 16 at 6:30a ET: Stage 15 – Les Gets les Portes du Soleil to Saint Gervais Mont Blanc 

July 17: Rest Day – No Coverage 

July 18 at 6:30a ET: Stage 16 – Passy to Combloux 

July 19 at 6a ET: Stage 17 – Saint Gervaise Mont Blanc to Courchevel 

July 20 at 6:30a ET: Stage 18 - Moûtiers to Bourg en Bresse 

July 21 at 7a ET: Stage 19 – Moirans en Montagne to Poligny 

July 22 at 7a ET: Stage 20 – Belfort to Le Markstein Fellering 

July 23 at 10a ET: Saint Quentin en Yvelines to Paris Champs Elysées 

Where can I watch the Tour de France? 

The Grand Départ will be LIVE on both NBC and Peacock. After that, most stages will be exclusive to Peacock, but some will also be broadcast on USA. If you want to see every stage, including the finale on the Champs Elysées in Paris, you’ll want to make sure you have Peacock. 

Stage 1: NBC and Peacock 

Stage 2: Exclusively on Peacock 

Stages 3-7: USA and Peacock 

Stages 8-21: Exclusively on Peacock 

Can I Watch a Stage Later if I Can’t Catch it Live? 

Yes! In addition to full live coverage, Peacock will have full replays available of every stage of the Tour de France. You’ll also be able to stream highlights, recaps, interviews, and much more. Every replay will be available after the conclusion of each stage so you never have to miss a moment. The Tour de France is the most dramatic race on the calendar, so Peacock is making sure you get to see it all. 

Which Cyclists Should I Look Out For? 

Defending champion Jonas Vingegaard is definitely one to watch. He’s an absolute phenom and there’s absolutely a possibility of him repeating this year. He’s not the only favorite though. Tadej Pogacar, who won the Tour in 2020 and 2021, will likely fight for the top spot the whole way through. The battle between these two is one of the most-anticipated elements of this year’s race. 

Australian cyclists Ben O’Connor and Jai Hindley could also make some noise, as could France’s David Gaudu and Ecuador’s Richard Carapaz. They could even pose a threat to the top two favorites if things break their way. Cycling is a fickle and unpredictable sport, after all. There are also a few American cyclists worth paying attention to, particularly Matteo Jorgenson and Neilson Powless. Even if they don’t win the whole thing, or even podium, they have a definite shot at securing some stage wins. That alone is a career highlight for pro cyclists. 

There is no race quite like the Tour de France. It’s long, dramatic, and a true test of endurance. Emotions run high for the entire three weeks, making for the most thrilling race of the year. Get Peacock now to see it all. 

Watch the Tour de France on Peacock. 

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how long until tour de france

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Tour de France - stage six

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Steve Sutcliffe

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Will Tadej Pogacar spend the rest of the Tour in yellow now? You wouldn't put it past the two-time champion would you.

Anyway you can read about how he took control of the general classification in our stage six report.

I'll see you all on Friday as the first summit finish sees the race return to La Planche des Belles Filles a decade after it first appeared on the Tour.

It should be another enthralling day. You can follow our live coverage from around 12:15 BST.

Post update

Pidcock

Now for a few words from Ineos Grenadiers rider Tom Pidcock.

The 22-year-old showed up well in the final parts of stage six after delivering a huge turn to help Geraint Thomas on Wednesday. "I was thinking there was no way I can contest the finale," he told Eurosport.

"I was feeling good but [Primoz] Roglic went early and kind of caught me by surprise, it kind of killed my momentum."

He then went on to deliver a few choice words to describe the brilliance of Wout van Aert which I can't repeat but the gist of it was the Belgian was playing with the peloton all day and taking the mickey.

Trailing in Pogacar's wake

Just look at how that sprint to the line unfolded. Everyone was pretty much trailing in Tadej Pogacar's wake.

Pogacar

'Every time I win it’s even better than before'

Pogacar

Time to hear from the stage winner, defending champion and the bloke who will now be wearing the yellow jersey on Friday. Here's what Tadej Pogacar has had to say: "Every time I win it’s even better than before. It was such a hard day from the start. The first two hours were so crazy.

"The strongest guy was the in the break. Many teams were pulling the peloton strongly, our team did it as well. In the end, the peloton was stronger [than Wout van Aert] but we were not sure to catch him.

"I was feeling good. My team did an incredibly good job to put me in a perfect position. It was not a pure sprint after we rode the last two climbs above threshold.

"I guess I had good legs to push in the end. I don’t mind to take the yellow jersey but I’m above all happy to take the stage win. Everything else is bonus.”

General classification after stage six

Here's how things look at the top of the general classification:

1. Tadej Pogacar (Slo/UAE Team Emirates) 20hrs 44mins 44secs

2. Neilson Powless (US/EF Education-EasyPost +4secs

3. Jonas Vingegaard (Den/Jumbo - Visma) +31secs

4. Adam Yates (GB/Ineos Grenadiers) +39secs

5. Tom Pidcock (GB/Ineos Grenadiers) +40secs

6. Geraint Thomas (GB/Ineos Grenadiers) +46secs

7. Aleksandr Vlasov (Rus/Bora-Hansgrohe) +52secs

8. Daniel Martinez (Col/Ineos Grenadiers) +1min

9. Romain Bardet (Fra/DSM) 1mins 1secs

10. David Gaudu (Fra/Groupama/FDJ) 1mins 2secs

Van Aert finishes in gruppetto

In case you are wondering what happened to long-time leader Wout van Aert...

The Belgian rolled in with the gruppetto and surely his final day in the yellow jersey.

Stage six results

1. Tadej Pogacar (Slo/UAE Team Emirates) 4hrs 27mins 13secs

2. Michael Matthews (Aus/BikeExchange - Jayco) Same time

3. David Gaudu (Fra/Groupama - FDJ)

4. Tom Pidcock (GB/Ineos Grenadiers)

5. Nairo Quintana (Col/Arkea Samsic)

6. Dylan Teuns (Bel/Bahrain Victorious)

7. Jonas Vingegaard (Den/Jumbo-Visma)

8. Daniel Martinez (Col/Ineos Grenadiers)

9. Primoz Roglic (Slo/Jumbo-Visma)

10. Romain Bardet (Fra/DSM)

Strong finish from Pidcock and Yates

Thomas Pidcock and Adam Yates both finish on the same time as Tadej Pogacar though they won't get any bonus seconds after finishing outside the top three.

Has Geraint Thomas shipped five seconds? He looked as though he was in the lead group finishing behind Pogacar but perhaps not.

Michael Matthews was grimacing and looked so frustrated at the end but that was something else from Tadej Pogacar.

Tadej Pogacar wins stage six

Tadej Pogacar

What can't this bloke do? Has he pinched the yellow jersey here?

Tadej Pogacar sprints for the line can Michael Matthews catch him?

This is winding up nicely...Primoz Roglic is there as well and starts to go...

Tom Pidcock is still shadowing Tadej Pogacar who is being led out by Brandon McNulty.

Tom Pidcock is sat on Tadej Pogacar's wheel.

Is this an opportunity for the British rider to claim a maiden Tour de France stage win?

Alexis Vuillermoz makes his way up the final climb. Is Tadej Pogacar going to explode clear here?

Alexis Vuillermoz presses on. He's got five or six seconds on Tadej Pogacar, Primoz Roglic and co.

Peter Sagan has been dropped. No repeat of 2017 for the Slovakian.

Geraint Thomas and Adam Yates are still up there.

Alexis Vuillermoz attacks...

Tadej Pogacar now launches.

how long until tour de france

NBC4 Washington

Everything to know about the 2023 Tour de France

Cycling's biggest event will begin on july 1, by max molski • published june 28, 2023 • updated on june 28, 2023 at 11:25 am.

The top cyclists from around the globe are about to embark on a grueling journey through France.

The 110th Tour de France is set to begin this weekend as competitors chase yellow jerseys and the overall top prize throughout the next month. The event will conclude in Paris after 21 stages with one racer being crowned the champion.

Here is everything to know about this year’s Tour de France, including TV information, course details and key racers.

When does the 2023 Tour de France begin?

We're making it easier for you to find stories that matter with our new newsletter — The 4Front. Sign up here and get news that is important for you to your inbox.

The Tour de France does not actually begin in France.

The competition begins on Saturday, July 1, with the Grand Depart in Bilbao, Spain. Racers will cross over into France in Stage 3 and remain there until they cross the final finish line.

When does the 2023 Tour de France end?

how long until tour de france

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how long until tour de france

Snoop Dogg selects NFL players for his dream 2028 Olympic flag football team

Speaking of the end, the 2023 Tour de France will conclude on Sunday, July 23, when the cyclists race from Yvelines to Paris in the final stage.

How to watch the 2023 Tour de France

NBC, Peacock and USA Network will broadcast different stages of the 2023 Tour de France.

Peacock will also air pre-race shows ahead of each stage of the competition.

How to stream the 2023 Tour de France

Coverage can be streamed on Peacock, NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app.

How long is the 2023 Tour de France?

The total distance for the 2023 Tour de France is 3,408.9 kilometers (2,118 miles). Cyclists will have to go that distance across 21 stages with just two rest days throughout the event.

2023 Tour de France route

Here is a look at each stage of the 2023 Tour de France with start and finish points, as well as distance:

  • Stage 1: July 1, Bilbao to Bilbao, 182 km
  • Stage 2: July 2, Vitoria Gasteiz to Saint-Sebastien, 209 km
  • Stage 3: July 3, Amorebieta-Etxano to Bayonne, 193.5 km
  • Stage 4: July 4, Dax to Nogaro, 182 km
  • Stage 5: July 5, Pau to Laruns, 163 km
  • Stage 6: July 6, Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque, 145 km
  • Stage 7: July 7, Mont-de-Marsan to Bordeaux, 170 km
  • Stage 8: July 8, Libourne to Limoges, 201 km
  • Stage 9: July 9, Saint-Leonard-de-Noblat to Puy de Dome, 182.5 km
  • Stage 10: July 11, Vulcania to Issoire, 167.5 km
  • Stage 11: July 12, Clermont-Ferrand to Moulins, 180 km
  • Stage 12: July 13, Roanne to Belleville-en-Beaujolais, 169 km
  • Stage 13: July 14, Chatillon-sur-Chalaronne to Grand Colombier, 138 km
  • Stage 14: July 15, Annemasse to Morzine Les Portes du Soleil, 152 km
  • Stage 15: July 16, Les Gets Les Portes du Soleil to Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc, 179 km
  • Stage 16: July 18, Passy to Combloux, 22.4 km
  • Stage 17: July 19, Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc to Courchevel, 166 km
  • Stage 18: July 20, Moutiers to Bourg-en-Bresse, 185 km
  • Stage 19: July 21, Moirans-en-Montagne to Poligny, 173 km
  • Stage 20: July 22, Belfort to Le Markstein Fellering, 133.5 km
  • Stage 21: July 23, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines to Paris Champs-Elysees, 115.5 km

2023 Tour de France prize money

The total prize money for this year’s competition is €2,308,200, which is around $2.5 million.

The winner will take home €500,000 (around $546,000), the second-place finisher will earn €200,000 (around $218,000) and third place will collect €100,000 (around $109,000).

Who will race in the Tour de France 2023?

Each of the last three Tour winners will be racing in 2023.

Jonas Vingegaard of Denmark is looking for a repeat after emerging victorious in 2022. Tadej Pogacar of Slovenia already has a back-to-back under his belt, winning consecutively in 2020 and 2021. Egan Bernal of Colombia, the 2019 winner, is eyeing his second Tour title.

Mark Cavendish’s last ride will also be something to watch. The 38-year-old from Great Britain is tied for the all-time record in Tour stage wins (34) and said 2023 will be his final season.

As for the U.S., six Americans will participate this year: Lawson Craddock, Matteo Jorgenson, Sepp Kuss, Neilson Powless, Quinn Simmons and Kevin Vermaerke. Powless’ 12th-place finish last year was the best finish by an American in the competition since 2015.

In all, 22 teams will compete in the 2023 Tour de France. Each team has 10 members, two of whom are substitutes.

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how long until tour de france

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When is the 2023 tour de france start time, how to watch, route, and more.

The world’s most famed bicycle race is back for its 110th year, as the 2023 Tour de France will get underway in just a few weeks, Saturday, July 1 through Sunday, July 23, airing on both NBC and Peacock .

Aside from intense racing and historic sites, this year’s race will bring 12 new stage towns to the map, with the Grand Depart taking place in a new location as well.

NBC Sports has you covered with everything you need to know about the 2023 Tour de France. See below to find out more information for the grand race, including start time, schedule, route and more.

RELATED: NBC to remain exclusive home of Tour de France

2023 Tour de France Key Information

When is the 2023 tour de france.

The 2023 Tour de France will take place from July 1-23. The riders will embark on the first stage in Bilbao on Saturday, July 1, with coverage on NBC Sports and Peacock from start to finish.

What are the start and end cities for the Tour de France 2023?

The world’s most prestigious race will get underway in Bilbao, Spain, the most populous city in the Basque Country. This will be the first time that Bilbao has hosted a stage of the Tour, and the second consecutive year the race begins outside of France.

As the riders venture along the extremely difficult course, the race will find its finish as it has since 1975, on the street of Champs-Élysées in Paris.

RELATED: Van der Poel dominates at 2023 Paris-Roubaix

How many teams are in the Tour?

22 teams will make up the peloton of the Tour de France. Of these teams are the 18 UCI WorldTeams that received an automatic invite and four UCI ProTeams.

UCI WorldTeams

  • AG2R Citroën Team (Fra)
  • Alpecin Deceuninck (Bel)
  • Astana Qazaqstan Team (Kaz)
  • Bora-Hansgrohe (Ger)
  • EF Education-Easypost (Usa)
  • Groupama-FDJ (Fra)
  • Ineos Grenadiers (Gbr)
  • Intermarché-Circus-Wanty (Bel)
  • Jumbo-Visma (Ned)
  • Movistar Team (Esp)
  • Soudal Quick-Step (Bel)
  • Team Arkea-Samsic (Fra)
  • Team Bahrain Victorious (Brn)
  • Team Cofidis (Fra)
  • Team DSM (Ned)
  • Team Jayco AlUla (Aus)
  • Trek-Segafredo (Usa)
  • UAE Team Emirates (Uae)

UCI ProTeams

  • Lotto Dstny (Bel)
  • TotalEnergies (Fra)
  • Israel-Premier Tech (Isr)
  • Uno-X Pro Cycling Team (Nor)

How long is this year’s route?

This year’s Tour route is a total of 3,404 km (2,115 miles) that is spread out over a span of three weeks. The riders will complete one stage per day, with two rest days on July 10 (between stages 9 and 10) and July 17 (between stages 15 and 16).

RELATED: Click here for all NBC Sports coverage of cycling

How many stages is the Tour de France?

The Tour de France 2023 is comprised of 21 stages: 6 flat, 6 hilly, 8 mountain and 1 individual time trial.

This will be the first year since 2015 that the Tour has only one individual time trial rather than two, with just 14 miles of time trial racing on the route.

What is the Tour de France schedule and route?

Who won the last tour de france.

Last year’s Tour de France crown was won by Team Jumbo-Visma member Jonas Vingegaard . The Danish rider overcame the strenuous course and extreme heat wave to secure his first Tour triumph, becoming just the second Dane to ever do so.

RELATED: Relive Jonas Vingegaard’s 2022 Tour de France victory

Be sure to follow OlympicTalk for the latest news, storylines, and updates on the 2023 Tour de France!

Pundit Feed

How Long Is Tour de France – Total Distance, Longest Stages, and More

UK: 18+ USA: 21+ | Begambleaware.org  | T&Cs apply | Play Responsibly

Have you ever wondered how many miles the modern gladiators on bikes need to cover just to finish Tour de France? Do you know what the entire Tour de France distance is? Do you know how many stages there are in Tour de France? Or how long the longest stage is? Well, we give you all the information below.

How Long Tour de France

The 3 longest stages of the 2023 Tour de France have already been raced but when they were? How long they were? Who won? Read on to find out.

  • 1 How long is Tour de France? How many miles are there in the Tour?
  • 2 How many stages there are in Tour de France?
  • 3.1 The longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France
  • 3.2 The 2nd longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France
  • 3.3 The 3rd longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France

How long is Tour de France? How many miles are there in the Tour?

The 2023 Tour de France totals exactly 3,402.8 kilometres or about 2,115 miles. Compared to last year the 2023 Tour is slightly longer with the 2022 edition being 3,349.8 kilometres (2.081.5 miles).

The start of the tour was in the Basque Country of Spain for the 2nd time in history, the first one was back in 1992. The entire 3,402.8 kilometres will stretch over 3 days of riding in Spain and the rest will be in France. The 2023 Tour de France will visit 6 regions and 23 departments on French soil.

How many stages there are in Tour de France?

The 2023 Tour de France has 21 stages and 2 rest days. It all started on July 01st in Bilbao (Spain) with the final set to be once again on the iconic Champs-Élysées in Paris on July 23rd. The brief description of the 21 stages of this year’s tour is as follows: 8 flat stages; 4 hilly stages; 8 mount stages with 4 summit finishes (Cauterets-Cambasque, Puy de Dôme, Grand Colombier and Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc), 1 individual time trial and 2 rest days.

Now let’s look in more detail at all the 21 stages of this year’s Tour:

Stage 1: 182km (113.1 miles) Bilbao to Bilbao (hilly)

Stage 2: 209km (129.9 miles) Vitoria-Gasteiz to Saint-Sébastien (hilly)

Stage 3: 187.4km (116.5 miles) Amorebieta-Etxano to Bayonne (flat)

Stage 4: 182km (113.1 miles) Dax to Nogaro (flat)

Stage 5: 163km (101.3 miles) Pau to Laruns (mountain)

Stage 6: 145km (90.1 miles) Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque (mountain)

Stage 7: 170km (105.6 miles) Mont-de-Marsan to Bordeaux (flat)

Stage 8: 201km (124.9 miles) Libourne to Limoges (hilly)

Stage 9: 182.5km (113.4 miles) Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat to Puy de Dôme (mountain)

Rest Day July 10th

Stage 10: 167.5km (104.1 miles) Vulcania to Issoire (hilly)

Stage 11: 180km (111.9 miles) Clermont-Ferrand to Moulins (flat)

Stage 12: 169km (105 miles) Roanne to Belleville-en-Beaujolais (hilly)

Stage 13: 138km (85.8 miles) Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne to Grand Colombier (mountain)

Stage 14: 152km (94.5 miles) Annemasse to Morzine Les Portes du Soleil (mountain)

Stage 15: 179km (111.2 miles) Les Gets Les Portes du Soleil to Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc (mountain)

Rest Day July 17th

Stage 16: 22.4km (13.9 miles) Passy to Combloux (individual time trial)

Stage 17: 166km (103.2 miles) Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc to Courchevel (mountain)

Stage 18: 185km (115 miles) Moûtiers to Bourg-en-Bresse (hilly)

Stage 19: 173km (107.5 miles) Moirans-en-Montagne to Poligny (flat)

Stage 20: 133.5km (83 miles) Belfort to Le Markstein Fellering (mountain)

Stage 21: 115.5km (71.7 miles) Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines to Paris Champs-Élysées (flat)

There you have it! The entire 21 stages, every mile, every city and mountain top the 176 riders in the field will visit during the 2023 Tour de France.

Which are the 3 longest stages of the 2023 Tour de France?

The 3 longest stages of this year’s Tour were early on, all 3 were in week 1 of the race. Here is a bit more about them and who won each of these 3 marathon stages:

The longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France

Stage 2 (July 02nd): 209km (129.9 miles) Vitoria-Gasteiz to Saint-Sébastien (hilly)

Winner: Victor Lafay

Brief: At more than 200km this is the longest stage of the 2023 Tour. The entire day ride takes place in Spain’s Basque country. After starting at Bilbao the riders follow the picturesque coastline. As the stage progresses some small climbs begin to turn the terrain hilly. There are 5 categorised climbs in total with the Category 2 Jaizkible climb (8.3km) shortly before the finish guaranteeing some drama.

As things developed Victor Lafay won this stage after being part of a successful breakaway and attacking hard on the mentioned above final climb.

The 2nd longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France

Stage 8 (July 08th):  201km (124.9 miles) Libourne to Limoges (hilly)

Winner: Mads Pedersen

Brief: Stage 8 of this year’s Tour has the honours to be the 2nd longest and the only other stage over 200km. The first 130km of the profile as the cyclist head east of Libourne towards Bordeaux and Limoges are pretty flat. Things become much more hillier after that with the stage finishing with 3 short categorised climbs.

As expected a successful breakaway helped Mads Pedersen to claim the stage win. However, the day was sad for many as the legendary sprinter Mark Cavendish, chasing a historic 35th stage win, crashed out of the race on that day.

The 3rd longest stage of the 2023 Tour de France

Stage 3 (July 03rd): 187.4km (116.5 miles) Amorebieta-Etxano to Bayonne (flat)

Winner: Jasper Philipsen

Brief: Stage 3 was the first stage of the 2023 Tour de France profiled to suit the sprinters. This was also the only stage that started in Spain but finished in France. After a few small climbs in the opening 100km things flatten out for the second half of the stage and the fastest men will get their chance as they arrive in Bayonne.

As expected stage 3 produced the first sprint finish of the 2023 Tour de France. It saw the green jersey favourite Jasper Philipsen record his first stage win too. The Belgian went on a winning streak after this triumph.

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About the author

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Iskra had a promising, at least she believed so, tennis and volleyball careers as a junior but a series of injuries ended her hopes to become a professional athlete very early.

Instead, she focused all her energy on her other passion, writing. For over a decade, Iskra had been a freelance sports writer. Football, basketball and tennis are the main fields of her expertise.

Tour de France stage 16 time trial start times

22.4km time trial from Passy to Combloux the next set piece in historic duel between Pogacar and Vingegaard

Jonas Vingegaard in action during the O Gran Camino

The 2023 Tour de France begins its next phase on Tuesday's stage 16 22.4 kilometre time trial from Passy to Combloux, with Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) chasing Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) at the tail end of the start list.

The two have been locking horns for two weeks and have shown little if any effects of the accumulated fatigue of their intensely close-fought competition.

Separated by just 10 seconds in the GC standings , each rider will be looking for any millisecond of time difference. If the Tour de France continues as it has - should the two be tied on time in Paris - their time trial time would be taken down to the 100ths of a second to decide the winner.

  • Tour de France Stage 16 Live : The time trial battle for yellow

It will be a tense day to begin an intense final week, and a long build-up as the stage begins at 1:05 p.m. CEST bookended by Danish riders. Michael Mørkøv (Soudal-Quickstep) is the first man down the ramp as the lanterne rouge.

Look for Mikkel Bjerg (UAE Team Emirates) to be one of the quickest of the early starters, taking off at 1:33 p.m. The Dane won the hilly time trial of the Critérium du Dauphiné in June and will be looking to set a benchmark for Pogačar.

Another rider to watch is Neilson Powless (EF Education-EasyPost). He's tied on points for the mountains classification with Giulio Ciccone (Lidl-Trek) and will look to set the fastest time up the Côte de Domancy to get the points for the category 2 ascent between kilometre 16.1 and 18.9.

The riders atop the current overall Tour de France standings come much later in the afternoon, with 10th-placed Guillaume Martin (Cofidis) heading down the start ramp at 4:42 p.m.

Pogačar begins his push to nab the maillot jaune at 4:48 p.m. two minutes before Vingegaard. 

Organisers are estimating the winning time to be in the 36-minute range, so be sure to be tuned into Cyclingnews for all of the updates before the winner is decided.

how long until tour de france

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Laura Weislo

Laura Weislo has been with Cyclingnews since 2006 after making a switch from a career in science. As Managing Editor, she coordinates coverage for North American events and global news. As former elite-level road racer who dabbled in cyclo-cross and track, Laura has a passion for all three disciplines. When not working she likes to go camping and explore lesser traveled roads, paths and gravel tracks. Laura's specialises in covering doping, anti-doping, UCI governance and performing data analysis.

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Tour de France: Island of Ireland bid to host Grand Depart withdrawn

  • Published 4 days ago

Belgium is among the countries to have previously hosted the first leg of the Tour de France

Belgium is among the countries to have previously hosted the first leg of the Tour de France

An island of Ireland bid to host the Tour de France Grand Depart in either 2026 or 2027 has been withdrawn.

Irish Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Sports and Media, Catherine Martin, and former NI Economy Minister Gordon Lyons, had submitted an expression of interest in the formal bidding process to the Tour organisers.

However, the Department for the Economy (DfE) confirmed it could not progress its interest due to "funding reductions this year and a lack of certainty about the budget position in future years".

In a statement, the DfE said: "Unfortunately, due to funding reductions this year and a lack of certainty about the budget position in future years, the Department for the Economy had to take the decision that it could not progress to the development of a feasibility study for the all-island bid to host the Tour De France, Le Grand Depart in 2026 or 2027.

"The Department does not rule out taking part in a future feasibility assessment of co-hosting this event, should the opportunity arise."

In a written answer to a question during a debate in the Dail, Irish Sports Minister Thomas Byrne said the DfE had written to his department in July to say it had ceased work on a bid.

"The Tour de France is the biggest cycling race in the world and, during 2022, Minister Martin engaged with her counterpart in Northern Ireland, the then-minister for the economy, regarding a potential joint bid to co-host the opening three stages of the race, the Grand Depart," said Byrne.

"Departmental officials engaged with counterparts in Northern Ireland and established a project group to scope out the details of a possible bid.

"In July 2023 the Department for the Economy in Northern Ireland wrote to my department to advise that it had decided to cease work on the potential for a joint bid.

"As any hosting bid was envisaged as a north-south all-island initiative my department is no longer pursuing a bid and this has been communicated to the event organisers.

"Should the opportunity arise again to consider a bid to host the Grand Depart, whether jointly or singly, the experience gained in the process outlined above will be of use to any such future consideration."

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